Senior Coast Guard Leadership

Key Strategies & Documents

ImageTitleDescriptionPublication Date
 Coast Guard Publication 3-0, OperationsSince 1790 the Coast Guard has conducted integrated, layered operations across vast geographic maritime areas of responsibility to meet the evolving threats and challenges that face the Nation. The Coast Guard operates in the maritime domain, an enormous and complex environment. The physical characteristics of the sea present varying, dynamic and dangerous weather, seas states and water conditions. Human activity on the water continues to expand in a domain that does not readily sustain it. The maritime industry continues to evolve as the world remains fully dependent on global maritime trade in an advancing technology and information age. Varied and overlapping international and sovereign legal and policy regimes governing the maritime domain pose practical operational challenges. The Coast Guard requires a comprehensive concept of operations to successfully conduct operations in this unique operating environment.2/29/2012
 Arctic StrategyAs Arctic ice recedes and maritime activity increases, the Coast Guard must be prepared to administer and inform national objectives over the long-term. The United States is an Arctic nation, and the Coast Guard supports numerous experienced and capable partners in the region. The aim of this strategy is to ensure safe, secure, and environmentally responsible maritime activity in the Arctic. This strategy establishes objectives to meet this aim and support national policy. Framed with a planning horizon of 10 years, it delineates the ends, ways, and means for achieving strategic objectives while articulating factors that contribute to long-term success.5/31/2013
 Doctrine for the U.S. Coast Guard, Pub 1Our Coast Guard began in 1790 with a plan to govern the maritime commerce of our fledgling Nation. In that year, Congress authorized the construction of ten cutters to improve enforcement of customs duties and tonnage taxes. Since then our responsibilities have continuously expanded to encompass every aspect of maritime governance. Today, as the Nation’s maritime first responder, we fulfill our present day strategic mission of ensuring the Safety, Security and Stewardship of the Nation’s waters by protecting those on the sea, protecting the Nation against threats delivered by sea, and protecting the sea itself.2/28/2014
 Western Hemisphere StrategyThis strategy addresses transnational threats and maritime challenges that threaten the security of our Nation, markets, and oceans over the next 10 years. As our mission space changes, we must prepare for the future.9/30/2014
 U.S. Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fleet PlanThe USCG and NOAA share a legacy of collaboration stretching back to the beginning of our Nation. Over 207 years of mutual interests and intersecting missions have given rise to productive partnerships in the maritime and atmospheric domains. Common throughout these partnerships is reliance upon people and capital assets – uniformed service members and civilian personnel, ships, boats, aircraft, satellites, and autonomous and remotely piloted vehicles. These resources are employed to support our Nation’s economic welfare and sustain our natural resources. They also form the basis of, and contribute to, the United States’ ability to project soft sea power.10/31/2014
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