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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Vaccine Guidance

What you need to know

  • The Coast Guard remains committed to protecting our Service members, civilian employees, and families; safeguarding our national security capabilities; and supporting the whole-of nation response to the pandemic.
  • All Coast Guard active duty and Ready Reserve members who are not fully vaccinated, and do not fall within an approved exception, must now be vaccinated against COVID-19. If you have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine, you must be fully vaccinated, as soon as operations allow, starting immediately.
  • The requirement to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 constitutes a lawful general order. Refusal by Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members to fully vaccinate against COVID-19 in the timelines prescribed, absent an approved medical exemption or approved religious accommodation, will constitute a failure to obey a lawful general order.
  • Vaccine requirements are tied to personal medical readiness, and are designed to afford Service members with the best protections available so they can perform missions across the globe. Required vaccination to protect personnel is routine for the Coast Guard, including annual influenza vaccination. In concert with Department of Defense (DoD) guidance, the Coast Guard currently requires vaccines for individuals entering military service and other vaccines depending on the Service member’s role and geographic region.
  • Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members may choose to receive any COVID-19 vaccine that is fully approved by the FDA, administered under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), or is included on the World Health Organization Emergency Use Listing. Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members shall be provided any vaccine that has received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensure.
  • The FDA-approved Pfizer-BioNTech product Comirnaty (COVID-19 Vaccine, mRNA) and the FDA-authorized Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine under EUA have the same formulation and can be administered interchangeably to provide the COVID-19 vaccination series. The Vaccine Information Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers provides additional information about both the approved and authorized vaccine.
  • Vaccine(s) for COVID-19 are only available after they are demonstrated to be safe and effective in large phase three clinical trials, have been authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and have been manufactured and distributed safely and securely.
  • After COVID-19 vaccination, you may have some side effects. This is a normal sign that your body is building protection. Although there have been a small percentage of fully vaccinated people who have gotten sick from COVID-19, their symptoms are less severe than those who are unvaccinated.

Select vaccine related FAQs from the dropdown.

COVID-19 | Sept. 20, 2021

Mandatory Vaccination for Military Members FAQs

General

Q. Can I meet the COVID-19 vaccine requirement through previous infection with COVID-19, or the results of an antibody test?
A. No. Because research is ongoing as to whether previous infection with COVID-19 confers lasting protection, previous COVID-19 infection is not considered proof of immunity. A history of COVID-19 disease and/or a positive antibody test or other positive test for COVID-19 does not exempt a Service Member from being required to be vaccinated for COVID-19. The only acceptable proof of immunity is completion of a COVID-19 vaccination series.

 

Q: If a member has verbally acknowledged obligation to vaccinate and stated intent to vaccinate, must the person be counseled and issued a CG-3307? 
A: No, but the member must be counseled if they do not immediately follow through, operations permitting, in scheduling and receiving COVID-19 vaccination as directed in ALCOAST 315/21. 

 

Q. Who can sign the first CG-3307 (P&D-41A)? 
A. Commanders, Commanding Officers and Officers in Charge are the only ones authorized to sign the CG-3307 (P&D-41A). This includes Commanding Officers of Military or Enlisted Personnel. 

This does not include office chiefs, command staff, or civilian supervisors. While the Commander, Commanding Officer, or Officer in Charge must sign the CG-3307 (P&D-41A), counseling may be conducting by a supervisor or member of the command staff. 

 

Q. If I have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine, how soon must I be fully vaccinated?
A. As soon as operations allow, starting immediately. Commanders, Commanding Officers, and Officers in Charge shall direct unvaccinated Active Duty and Ready Reserve Coast Guard members to initiate the COVID-19 vaccination regimen immediately, and in doing so shall ensure members are scheduled and made available to receive the vaccine.

 

Q: Is the COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for all service members?
A: Yes. All Coast Guard active duty and Ready Reserve members who are not fully vaccinated, and do not fall within an approved exception, must now be vaccinated against COVID-19.

 

Q. If I am unvaccinated, can I get any vaccine I want?
A. Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members may choose to receive any COVID-19 vaccine that is fully approved by the FDA, administered under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), or is included on the World Health Organization Emergency Use Listing.

Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members shall be provided any vaccine that has received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensure. Currently, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, which was licensed by the FDA on 23 August 2021, meets this requirement.

For now, if you receive any of these three vaccines – Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson/Janssen – in accordance with their dosing and timing requirements, you will be considered fully vaccinated.

 

Q. Given this mandate, am I still required to be vaccinated if I already had COVID-19?
A. Yes.  Previous COVID-19 infection does not satisfy the vaccine mandate.  Military members with previous COVID-19 infection are not considered fully vaccinated based solely on having been infected, and must be vaccinated. Consistent with the Secretary of Defense’s direction, all Coast Guard active duty and Ready Reserve members who are not fully vaccinated, and do not fall within an approved exception, must now be vaccinated against COVID-19.

 

Q: Do I need to do anything if I’m already fully vaccinated?
A: If you were vaccinated at a Coast Guard clinic, no further action is required.

If you were vaccinated by a non-Coast Guard provider before the order for mandatory vaccinations was issued and have not yet reported your status to a Coast Guard medical provider, you must do so as soon as possible. Those members who get vaccinated outside of a Coast Guard clinic shall provide the following information to their respective Coast Guard clinic: (1) date the vaccine was administered, (2) the vaccine name or code, (3) the manufacturer and lot number, (4) the dose administered, and (5) the vaccination provider (i.e. Walgreens, CVS, etc). Providing false vaccination information is a violation of Article 107, Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), and may also result in administrative and/or disciplinary action.

 

Policy/Authorities

Q. Why is the Coast Guard mandating military vaccinations now?
A. After months of infections and hospitalizations going down, there has been a steep rise in COVID-19 cases due to the rapid spread of the Delta variant. Delta puts us in a much more challenging situation because it is significantly more transmissible, with evidence that it causes more serious disease. Due to the variant’s highly transmissible nature, it is spreading widely among the unvaccinated populations, putting them at great risk. This negatively impacts the readiness of military units and increases demands on military hospitals and clinics.

Additionally, the COVID-19 vaccines have proven to be safe and very effective in preventing hospitalizations and deaths. As we do with other deadly infections, we want to protect Coast Guard personnel, our families, and our communities through the best tool available, vaccination. Further, a fully vaccinated workforce helps ensure mission readiness.  Required vaccination to protect personnel is routine for the Coast Guard, including annual influenza vaccination. In concert with Department of Defense (DoD) guidance, the Coast Guard currently requires vaccines for individuals entering military service and other vaccines depending on the Service member’s role and geographic region.

 

Q. What makes Service members different from federal employees when it comes to enforcing certain requirements?
A. Vaccine requirements are tied to personal medical readiness, and are designed to afford Service members with the best protections available so they can perform missions across the globe. 

Required vaccinations are nothing new to the U.S. military. In concert with Department of Defense (DoD) guidance, the Coast Guard currently requires vaccines for individuals entering military service and other vaccines depending on the Service member’s role and geographic region.

 

Q. What happens if a Service member refuses to get the vaccine? (UPDATE)
A. The requirement to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 constitutes a lawful general order. Refusal by Coast Guard Active Duty and Ready Reserve members to fully vaccinate against COVID-19 in the timelines prescribed, absent an approved medical exemption or approved religious accommodation, will constitute a failure to obey a lawful general order. This order is punishable under Article 92 of the UCMJ, and may result in punitive and/or administrative action, including initiation of discharge proceedings.

The Coast Guard will determine additional measures necessary to mitigate health risks to members of the Service and our communities posed by those who are not yet vaccinated. These measures may include additional restrictions on official travel, liberty, and leave, as well as cancellation of “A” and “C” school orders. Additional guidance on the implementation of mandatory vaccinations is forthcoming.

 

Q: Are there authorized exemptions from the mandatory vaccination requirement?
A: Coast Guard policy allows, in some circumstances, medical exemptions and religious accommodations.

Under current Coast Guard policy in COMDTINST M6230.4G (a joint directive with other military services), a medical exemption includes any medical contraindication relevant to a specific vaccine or other medication, according to published recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

COMDTINST 1000.15, Military Religious Accommodation, provides the policy and procedures for requesting a religious accommodation.

 

Q: What is the process for requesting a medical exemption?
A. Members seeking a medical exemption from the COVID-19 vaccination requirement should notify their primary health care provider, who will review and forward the request to Chief of Preventive Medicine (CG-1121) for final decision.

Members that previously had medical exemptions for COVID-19 vaccination must re-submit their request for exemption to CG-1121, via their primary health care provider.

 

Q: Will there be a religious accommodation?
A. The Coast Guard will also consider an accommodation for a sincerely held religious belief. The Office of Military Personnel Policy, COMDT (CG-133) will adjudicate requests for religious accommodation consistent with Military Religious Accommodations, COMDTINST 1000.15. Requests for a religious accommodation are granted or denied on a case-by-case basis and will be informed by input from the member’s command, medical, judge advocate, and military chaplain.

 

Q: What is the process for requesting a religious accommodation?
A. Members should notify either their chaplain or Commanding Officer (CO) of their request for a religious accommodation. The member must submit a written request to their CO pursuant to Military Religious Accommodations, COMDTINST 1000.15. COs/OICs will consult with their servicing legal office while adjudicating member requests for religious accommodation. The member will then be counseled by their CO and a military physician, and must arrange an interview with a military chaplain. Once the counseling and interview is completed and documented, the command will forward the request through the appropriate chain and the Office of Health Services (CG-112), then to the Office of Military Personnel Policy (CG-133) for final decision.

 

Distribution

Q. Does the Coast Guard have a plan to distribute and administer the vaccine to all Service members?
A. Yes. Continuing the Service’s ongoing efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines, the Coast Guard will ensure that military members are administered the vaccine in a timely fashion.  Vaccines are readily available at Coast Guard clinics, military treatment facilities, and civilian healthcare providers.

 

Q. Are there enough vaccines available now to handle the surge in demand?
A. Yes. Vaccines are readily available at Coast Guard clinics, military treatment facilities, and civilian healthcare providers. Additional COVID-19 vaccines are being delivered to Coast Guard clinics to accelerate vaccination of the entire workforce and are available for any Active Duty or Ready Reserve member.

 

COVID-19 | Sept. 20, 2021

Vaccine General Information FAQs

Q. How is Comirnaty (COVID-19 Vaccine, mRNA) related to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine? 
A. The FDA-approved Pfizer-BioNTech product Comirnaty (COVID-19 Vaccine, mRNA) and the FDA-authorized Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine under EUA have the same formulation and can be administered interchangeably to provide the COVID-19 vaccination series. 

The Vaccine Information Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers provides additional information about both the approved and authorized vaccine. 

The Coast Guard’s service member vaccine mandate is consistent with the Secretary of Defense’s direction. The Secretary of Defense has authorized the use of compelled COVID-19 vaccinations in accordance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance. Per memorandum from Assistant Secretary for Defense (Health Affairs) issued 14 September 2021, DoD health care providers will use both the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine interchangeably for the purpose of vaccinating Service members in order to comply with the Secretary of Defense direction.  

 

Q. Where can individuals go for more information about the vaccine they will be administered?
A. Please visit the CDC’s webpage, Different COVID-19 Vaccines (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html), to learn more about the various vaccines in Phase 3 Clinical trials. You can also learn more about U.S. COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials, including vaccines in earlier stages of development, by visiting clinicaltrials.gov.

 

Q. What agency is responsible for the overall plan?
A. The Coast Guard is participating in the Department of Defense (DoD) COVID-19 Vaccine distribution operation. Agencies included in this partnership include, among others, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Coast Guard.  On 22 January 2021, the President issued a National Strategy for COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness, available at https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/National-Strategy-for-the-COVID-19-Response-and-Pandemic-Preparedness.pdf

COVID-19 | Sept. 20, 2021

Vaccine Development FAQs

Q. What are the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines?
A. Besides the active ingredients which help the body produce a protective immune response against the COVID-19 virus, depending on the vaccine, inactive ingredients include small amounts of polyethylene glycol, polysorbate 80, sodium chloride (salt), potassium chloride (salt substitute), sucrose (sugar), and citric acid (vitamin C). A full listing of ingredients is available at Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines | CDC.

None of the vaccines contain eggs, gelatin, latex, or preservatives. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals or any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, or nanowire semiconductors.

 

Q. What are the different types of COVID-19 vaccines?
A.
As COVID-19 vaccines are authorized and then recommended for use in the United States, it’s important to learn about the vaccines that are available.  The CDC provides information on who is eligible and recommended to receive each vaccine and what to expect after vaccination, as well as ingredients, safety, and effectiveness.  To read more from the CDC about the different COVID-19 vaccines, please read this CDC article. Currently, three vaccines are authorized (under an Emergency Use Authorization) and recommended to prevent COVID-19:

 

Q. How was the COVID-19 Vaccine developed so rapidly, in record time?
A. 
Due to the urgency and critical need to produce the vaccine and provide it to the public safely and quickly, our country expended every resource and made development and testing of COVID-19 vaccines a top priority. Authorization to use the vaccine came quickly because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accelerated the vaccines to the front line at every step. No compromises on safety or effectiveness were made during their development.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developing a vaccine and bringing it to market often takes many years. But because of work that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was already doing when the COVID-19 pandemic began, researchers were able to come up with vaccines for this new virus much more quickly. You can read more about the COVID-19 vaccine development effort here: COVID-19 Vaccine Development: Behind the Scenes.

 

Q. What is an Emergency Use Authorization?
A. Drugs and vaccines have to be licensed or authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure that only safe and effective products are available to the American public. In situations when there is strong scientific evidence that a product is safe and is likely to treat or prevent disease, the FDA may authorize its emergency use under specific circumstances.

This type of FDA pre-licensure approval is considered for treatment or prevention of diseases that are very serious and occurring during an outbreak or pandemic scenario. For the COVID-19 vaccines, the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) indicates that the FDA has found the vaccine to be safe, however, studies regarding the full duration of protection against disease will continue.

Pharmaceutical manufacturers choose whether to make a request for EUA or routine licensure based upon the circumstances. The processes used to evaluate the current COVID-19 vaccines for their safety and effectiveness were no less rigorous than if the manufacturers had requested an adjudication for a licensed vaccine. EUAs are permitted only during emergent circumstances.

 

Q. How is an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) different from full approval?
A. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) announcement, the issuance of an EUA is different than an FDA approval (licensure) of a vaccine. The FDA is able to grant a special type of interim approval called an EUA during public health emergencies. Just like full approval/licensure, an EUA looks at the totality of data and does a risk-benefit analysis. The FDA does a rigorous safety analysis and then looks at the how effectively the vaccine is at preventing disease in the context of a pandemic, when the disease is widespread and many people are routinely being infected.

If issued an EUA, vaccine manufacturers are obligated under FDA rules to continue their clinical trial monitoring and gather more data to fully understand how long the vaccine protection will last. Additionally, the FDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collect reports from those who receive the vaccines to develop the best understanding of common side-effects.

COVID-19 | Jan. 25, 2021

Vaccine Testing FAQs

Q: Will a COVID-19 vaccination affect COVID-19 test results?
A. No, COVID-19 vaccination will not affect the results of viral tests (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] or antigen). Vaccination may affect an antibody test; a positive COVID-19 antibody test could indicate vaccination OR previous infection.

 

Q. Should healthcare personnel who have been vaccinated be tested for COVID-19 if they develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19?
A. It depends. The COVID-19 vaccine is a two-dose series and high efficacy (or protection) is expected 10-14 days after the second dose. Thus, a member could potentially become infected with COVID-19 before, during or after the vaccination series and display symptoms in the post vaccination period. Providers should consider the following when making testing decisions:

  • Cough, shortness of breath, runny nose, sore throat, and loss of taste or smell are unlikely to be related to COVID-19 vaccination, and testing should be considered for these members. If antigen testing is used and is negative, confirmation testing should be confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test;
  • Most systemic post-vaccination symptoms (fever, fatigue, headache, chills, muscles, or body aches) occur within three days of vaccination and resolve within one to two days after starting. Testing may be considered in these situations. Please refer to the most recent CDC Guidance for Post Vaccine Considerations for Healthcare Personnel.
COVID-19 | Jan. 25, 2021

Vaccine Safety FAQs

 

Q. How is the CDC ensuring the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine in the United States?
A. 
According to the CDC, the U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Safety is a top priority while federal partners work to make this and other COVID-19 vaccines available. For more information about safety measures, clinical trials, and monitoring systems, please read this CDC article.

 

Q. Can someone get COVID-19 from the vaccine?
A. No, it is not possible to get COVID-19 from vaccines. Vaccines against COVID-19 use inactivated virus, parts of the virus, or a gene from the virus. None of these can cause COVID-19.

 

Q. Should I get the vaccine for influenza (flu shot)?
A. Yes, it is important to get the influenza vaccine, particularly this season when both influenza viruses and COVID-19 will infect people. However, the Coast Guard has prioritized administration of the COVID-19 vaccine ahead of the influenza vaccine.

 

Q. Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine after receiving another vaccine?
A. Yes, as provided it has been 14 days since the last vaccination.  Those receiving the COVID vaccine must wait 14 days after completing the COVID vaccine series before other immunizations are given.  Please consult your primary care physician or health care professional if you have specific questions about your circumstances.

COVID-19 | Sept. 20, 2021

Medical Exemptions FAQs

Q. What are the criteria for being granted a permanent medical exemption from the COVID-19 vaccine mandate? 
A. People who have had a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of COVID-19 vaccine, or people who are allergic to or have had a severe allergic reaction to an ingredient of the COVID-19 vaccine, can be granted a permanent medical exemption. Symptoms of severe allergy include rash, wheezing, and shortness of breath, and typically occur within 15 minutes after vaccination. 

Because these are very rare reactions to vaccination, we expect that granting of permanent exemptions will be infrequent. 

 

Q. What are the criteria for being granted a temporary medical exemption from the COVID-19 vaccine mandate? 
A. Because there are only a few specific medical criteria for granting of a temporary exemption, we expect that granting of temporary exemptions will be infrequent. 

Persons who are moderately to severely ill (with COVID-19 or any other illness) can receive a temporary exemption until they have recovered sufficiently and are no longer subject to isolation requirements. People who are acutely ill should not present for vaccination, since they might expose others to COVID-19 or other infections. Most people with minor illness without fever who are not subject to isolation should be vaccinated. 

People who are enrolled in COVID-19 related clinical studies can receive a temporary exemption until their participation in the trial is completed. The Coast Guard supports its members who voluntarily participate in important research, and does not want to interfere with the results of those studies. 

People who have been treated for COVID-19 disease with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma should receive a temporary exemption until 90 days have passed since their treatment. This is to ensure the body can respond to the vaccine, without interference by antibodies included in the monoclonal and plasma treatments. People who are not sure if they received these treatments should consult with their healthcare provider. As stated previously, having had COVID-19 previously is not a criteria for a permanent medical exemption. 

 

Q. Is pregnancy a justification for a medical exemption? 
A. Pregnant and recently pregnant people with COVID-19 are at increased risk for severe illness, and preterm birth. Additionally, pregnant people with COVID-19 might be at increased risk for serious pregnancy complications and outcomes, such as life-threatening high blood pressure, bleeding disorders, and stillbirth. 

Evidence on the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination – in both animal and human studies – indicates that the benefits of vaccination outweigh any known or potential risks of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy. 

Pregnant patients who have concerns about vaccination should have their concerns addressed by consultation with their prenatal care provider. If the care provider determines that it is appropriate to defer vaccination until later in pregnancy or post-pregnancy, a temporary medical exemption from vaccination until that time should be provided. 

Because of the benefits of vaccination for pregnant persons, pregnancy is not a criteria to receive a permanent medical exemption for COVID-19 vaccine. 

 

Q. Are temporary or permanent medical exemptions available for breastfeeding mothers? 
A. No. COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people aged 12 years and older, including people who are breastfeeding. The COVID-19 vaccines currently licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or approved for use under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), cannot cause infection in either the lactating person or the infant. Recent reports have shown that the antibodies developed from mRNA COVID-19 vaccination were present in breastmilk samples. More study is needed to determine if these antibodies protect newborns and infants against SARS-CoV-2 infection. 

 

Q. What are these medical exemption recommendations based on, and where can I get more Information? 
A. These recommendations are based on information contained in Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines | CDC and ACIP General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization | CDC 

These two websites have a great deal of information about COVID-19 vaccines, and general information about vaccination. 

 

Q. What if my health care provider needs more information? 
A. The Defense Health Agency offers a clinical consultation service. Details and phone contact information are available at Clinical Consultation Services | Health.mil

 

Q. Who Can Grant Temporary or Permanent Medical Exemptions?  
A. Authority to grant temporary medical exemptions shall remain with the local military-employed or affiliated Medical Officer (MO). TRICARE Prime Remote civilian primary care managers or network providers do not have authority to grant temporary exemptions. 

COMDT (CG-1121) is now the final approval authority for any permanent medical exemption to any mandatory vaccine, in accordance with ALCOAST 315/21 and Immunization and Chemoprophylaxis for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases, COMDTINST M6230.4 (series). CG MOs may apply for a permanent medical exemption to one or more vaccines on behalf of a patient by submitting a package to their Senior Medical Executive consisting of medical documentation (including specialist consultation, if applicable) supporting the exemption and an official memo requesting the exemption. 

 

Q. My clinic doesn’t have an available appointment within routine standards for medical exemption waiver submission (seven days). What should I do? 
A. All clinics have been instructed to make appointments available and should provide an appointment within routine access to care standards (seven days). 

If a circumstance occurs where an appointment within seven days cannot be provided to support the exemption, member should ask for documentation on when the next available appointment is. If you are unable to get an appointment within seven days, please notify your next level supervisor using the documentation provided by your clinic, in addition to notifying the Regional Manager, if appropriate. 

COVID-19 | May 5, 2021

Prior to Receiving the Vaccine FAQs

 

Q: Do members need to be tested for COVID-19 prior to getting the vaccine?
A. No. It is not recommended to test a member solely for the purpose of vaccine decision making.

 

Q. Which vaccine will the Coast Guard be issuing?
A. The Coast Guard expects to issue multiple vaccines that are authorized for use by the FDA as part of the DoD plan for COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

 

Q. Who will administer the vaccine?
A. Coast Guard medical staff will receive training on storage, handling, and administration of each vaccine.

 

Q. If I already had COVID-19, should I still get a vaccine?
A. Yes. Because the duration of immunity following COVID-19 disease can vary based upon the extent of exposure to the virus, eligible Coast Guard members are strongly encouraged to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. This vaccine is a safe and effective means for battling the disease, while at the same time keeping our families, friends, and communities safe and healthy.

 

Q: Is the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine now available?
A
: On April 23, 2021, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advisory committee recommended the resumption of administration of the J&J vaccine after a pause to analyze and investigate reports of rare but severe blood clots associated with low platelets in patients. The Coast Guard is now receiving limited doses of the J&J vaccine to administer to members, in addition to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines currently being administered.

 

Q: Is the Coast Guard planning on administering the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine?
A
: Yes. The Coast Guard is receiving limited doses of the J&J vaccine to administer to members, in addition to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines currently being administered. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide additional information on the J&J vaccine here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/janssen.html.

 

Q: Are there any advisories related to the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine?
A:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has added a warning to the J&J vaccine regarding rare clotting events that have been reported among vaccine recipients. The FDA advisory on the J&J vaccine can be read here: https://www.fda.gov/media/146305/download.

Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide information on the J&J vaccine here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/janssen.html.

 

Q: Should women under the age of 50 receive the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine?
A
: Women under the age of 50 can receive any Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-authorized COVID-19 vaccination. However, they should be aware of the rare risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) after receiving the J&J vaccine, and the availability of other FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines.

 

Q: Do I need to stop taking aspirin or anticoagulants prior to receiving the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine?
A
: No, you do not need to stop taking these medications. However, it is not recommended to take aspirin or anticoagulants prior to receiving the J&J vaccine, or any other Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-authorized COVID-19 vaccine.

 

Q. Who can I contact with specific questions about the vaccine?
A: In addition to speaking with Coast Guard health care professionals, you may also visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CDC-INFO site (https://www.cdc.gov/cdc-info/ask-cdc.html). The CDC-INFO site allows you to ask questions via web (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/dcs/ContactUs/Form) or phone (800-CDC-INFO [800-232-4636]).

COVID-19 | Sept. 7, 2021

Getting the Vaccine FAQs

Q. Will vaccines be available at Coast Guard medical clinics? When will they be available?
A. Yes. COVID-19 vaccinations are readily available at Coast Guard clinics for Active Duty and Selected Reserve personnel. Military members should contact their servicing Coast Guard clinic for information on vaccine availability or for recording of vaccine obtained on the Tricare network. The clinic front desk numbers are available on the HSWL app in the Medical Tab under the heading “USCG Clinic Front Desk Phone Numbers” and on the official CG website (www.uscg.mil/Coronavirus) under the “Vaccine Guidance” heading.   Active Duty and Selected Reserve personnel, wherever located, have several other options for obtaining COVID-19 vaccinations.

  1. Personnel under TRICARE may receive their vaccination from their Primary Care Provider or from a pharmacy that takes TRICARE.
  2. Personnel under TRICARE may receive their vaccination from a Department of Defense military treatment facility.
  3. The COVID Vaccine is federally funded and may also be available through state and local health departments.   A list of Coast Guard clinics supporting all units in the Coast Guard is available at: https://www.reserve.uscg.mil/Portals/2/Documents/PDF/HSWL_HRC_list_SELRES%232.pdf?ver=2018-08-17-135417-933 .

 

Q. Where will the Coast Guard doses be distributed?
A. Coast Guard clinics are providing COVID-19 vaccinations for Active Duty and Ready Reserve personnel. Military members should contact their servicing clinic for information on vaccine availability or to record vaccine obtained on the Tricare network. The clinic front desk numbers are available on the HSWL app in the Medical Tab under the heading “USCG Clinic Front Desk Phone Numbers” and on the official CG website (www.uscg.mil/Coronavirus) under the “Vaccine Guidance” heading. Additionally, a list of the available clinics offering the COVID-19 vaccination and their phone numbers can be found here.

 

Q. What should I expect when I receive the COVID-19 vaccine?
A. 
It is important to understand how your body responds to vaccines. According to the CDC’s article “Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work”, we must first look at how our bodies fight illness. COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection, but with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future. According to the CDC, getting vaccinated is one of many steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.  Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, it can cause severe illness or death. Within the U.S., over 568,000 people have died after developing COVID-19, the majority prior to COVID-19 becoming a vaccine preventable illness.

 

Q. What are the benefits of getting a COVID-19 vaccine?
A. Getting vaccinated will help prevent you from becoming infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 disease. While many people who become ill with the COVID-19 disease have only a mild illness, others may have serious, life-threatening complications, develop a severe illness, or die. There is no way to know how the COVID-19 disease will affect you, your family, colleagues, neighbors, or shipmates. Even if you are not at increased risk of severe complications, 60% of all infections are transmitted to others unwittingly by persons without symptoms. We still do not fully understand the long-term health consequences of the COVID-19 disease.

As with other vaccines, the COVID-19 vaccination protects you by creating an antibody response without having to experience the infection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide additional information and resources regarding COVID-19 vaccine safety, and how vaccine help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19, at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html.

 

Q. Are military members permitted to obtain the vaccine off-base if the opportunity presents itself?
A: Yes, military members are permitted to receive the COVID-19 vaccine off-base if the opportunity presents itself. We encourage members to obtain the vaccine at their servicing clinic, but they are not required to do so. However, if a member is vaccinated off-base, they will be responsible for informing their servicing medical clinic in order for that to be recorded in the member's medical record.

 

Q. If military members receive the vaccine off-base, will TRICARE cover the expense of the vaccine and will the VA cover if there are any complications down the road?
A. Yes. All military personnel may voluntarily get vaccinated outside of a Coast Guard clinic, but must meet the timeline prescribed by their Commanders, Commanding Officers, and Officers in Charge.

Personnel shall request and retain the hard copy immunization record from the vaccination clinic site. Those members who get vaccinated outside of a Coast Guard clinic shall provide the following information to their cognizant Coast Guard clinic: (1) date the vaccine was administered, (2) the vaccine

name or code, (3) the manufacturer and lot number, (4) the dose administered, and (5) the vaccination site (CVS, Walgreens, etc.) Providing false vaccination information is a violation of Article 107, UCMJ, and may also result in administrative and/or disciplinary action.

COVID-19 | May 5, 2021

Post Vaccine FAQs

 

Q: How long will protection last following vaccination?
A. We do not know how long protection will last following vaccination but it will be critically important to measure long-term protection in the phase 3 trials and in other groups prioritized for early vaccination. We are still learning about the duration of protection following infection with COVID-19 and it is too early to tell how long protection will last.

 

Q. Can a vaccinated person still transmit the SARS-COV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease?
A. Additional studies have shown that Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines not only prevent people who are exposed to the virus from contracting COVID-19, but also prevent them from spreading the virus to others.

More data is currently being collected to provide definitive answers regarding infectiousness and transmissibility of COVID-19 by those who have been vaccinated.  However, large studies have demonstrated that vaccinated persons have significantly fewer coronavirus infections, both asymptomatic (89.4%) and symptomatic (93.7%) based on nasal swab PCR tests, than found among unvaccinated persons.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends continuing to practice public health protective measures like washing your hands, wearing a mask, physical distancing, and frequently cleaning common areas.

 

Q: Can I still get sick with the COVID-19 disease once I have been vaccinated?
A: Yes, even though the vaccine is highly effective (has a high efficacy), it’s still possible for a vaccinated person to become ill. The protection provided by the vaccine is not immediate after receiving the second dose. Current information indicates it takes time for a person’s immune system to fully respond to the vaccine and produce antibodies. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), evidence from clinical trials indicates that the Pfizer vaccine reaches full potential, 95% efficacy, at least 7 days after the second dose. At the 95% effective rate, approximately 5% of those who receive both doses of the vaccine may still get the COVID-19 disease. Clinical trial data for the Moderna vaccine indicate that it reaches full potential, approximately 94% efficacy, at least 14 days after the second dose.

You can read more from the CDC about the different COVID-19 vaccines, including Pfizer and Moderna, at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines.html.

COVID-19 | April 8, 2021

Civilian and Contractors Vaccine FAQ

 

Q. Will the Coast Guard vaccinate civilian employees?
A. Yes, all Coast Guard civilian employees, including Non-Appropriated Funds (NAF) employees will have an opportunity to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. These vaccines will be administered at your local Coast Guard clinic as the vaccine becomes available. The Coast Guard planned for its service allocation from DoD to include all Coast Guard civilian employees (including NAF employees), and we are ready to enter required information on the vaccine into authoritative DoD and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention databases for any civilian employee who volunteers to be vaccinated by the Coast Guard.

 

Q. Will the Coast Guard vaccinate contractors?
A.
Mission essential Coast Guard contractors working onsite and in close proximity to their civilian and active duty counterparts in critical operations support activities and mission support functions are authorized to receive a COVID-19 vaccine administered by their local CG clinic as it becomes available and their tier priority is reached.  Further guidance for contract employees on how to obtain the vaccine from a Coast Guard clinic, including processes for requesting a vaccination, reporting procedures, general information, and other human resources policy matters will be provided through the chain of command.

 

Q. As a civilian employee, if I receive the vaccine in a Coast Guard clinic, how will that vaccination be tracked and what next steps should I take?
A. As a civilian employee, if you decide to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in a Coast Guard clinic, you will be responsible for reporting this to your civilian health care provider so they can include the vaccine in your health care record. Also, if you receive the vaccine outside of a Coast Guard or DOD Military Treatment Facility (MTF), you are encouraged to voluntarily report receipt of the vaccine to your nearest CG clinic to assist the CG in assessing how much of the total workforce has been vaccinated.

 

Q. As a civilian employee, if I decline to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in a Coast Guard clinic, can I still choose to receive it?
A. Coast Guard civilian employees who decide not to be vaccinated by the Coast Guard may choose to receive the vaccine through their health care providers when the vaccine becomes available.

 

Q. Will the Coast Guard distribute the vaccine to the American public too?
A. The President has released a National Strategy for COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness which includes direction for Federal government support to states and territories regarding national vaccine administration. The Coast Guard continues to vaccinate within the Service and stands ready to support national vaccination efforts as needed.

 

Q. Will the Coast Guard administer the vaccine to members/employees in the Department of Defense or other federal agencies?
A. The Coast Guard is offering to vaccinate civilian employees as the vaccine becomes available. As additional quantities of vaccine are received, the Coast Guard will reevaluate its ability to vaccinate additional populations.

COVID-19 | Sept. 20, 2021

Reservists Vaccine FAQs

Q. Will reservists be able to get the vaccine from a Coast Guard clinic? 
A. All Coast Guard clinics have the Pfizer-BioNTech/Cominarty vaccine available. Reservists are authorized to receive any of the three current COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech/Cominarty, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson/Janssen).  Reservists may be vaccinated at their local CG clinic in the same manner as active duty members.  

Similar to other required vaccinations, Reservists may also get the COVID-19 vaccine from a community site (pharmacy, medical provider, etc.).  If not vaccinated at a CG clinic, reservists must provide their servicing clinic with a copy of the vaccination record so it can be entered into their medical record. 

 

Q. Will reservists be compensated for getting the COVID-19 vaccine? 
A. Reservists will not be compensated (i.e. Inactive Duty Training [IDT], Readiness Management Period [RMP], or active duty orders) for the sole purpose of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. All orders must comply with the duty requirements outlined in Chapter 2 of the Reserve Duty Status and Participation Manual, COMDTINST M1001.2(series). 

Units may schedule a mass vaccination event for reservists during regularly scheduled IDT drill weekends. Most units have found this to be the most efficient way to vaccinate reservists. This may involve rescheduling one drill weekend to meet the Pfizer recommendation of administering the second dose three weeks after the first. There is no prohibition for rescheduling IDT drills during the first quarter of FY22. 

To receive the vaccine from a DoD Military Treatment Facility (MTF), reservists must be on orders. Reservists may request a non-pay RMP to receive the vaccination from a MTF. However, other duties will be assigned during that period to meet the minimum time period for an RMP in Chapter 2.A of the Reserve Duty Status and Participation Manual, COMDTINST M1001.2(series). 

If available, reservists may also receive the vaccine during other scheduled periods of active duty. Active duty orders will not be extended to allow the member to receive both doses of a multiple dose vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) while on active duty. 

 

Q. If a reservist has an adverse reaction and can’t go to work in their civilian job, will the Coast Guard put them on orders and pay them for the missed time from work? 
A. Severe adverse reactions to the COVID-19 vaccine are rare. Some experience soreness at the vaccination site for a couple of days, though this does not necessitate missing work.  Members experiencing an adverse reaction should be handled in the same manner as they would for any other medical situation in accordance with Chapter 6 of the Reserve Policy Manual, COMDTINST M1001.28 (series). 

 

Q. Are members of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) required to comply with the mandate? 
A. The COVID vaccine, just like the flu shot, is a condition of employment. Per ALCOAST 315/21, members in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) are required to be vaccinated in accordance with the deadline set by PSC-RPM (their assigned unit).  

Members of the IRR who refuse vaccination will be treated in a manner consistent with their Active Duty and drilling Reserve counterparts. 

COVID-19 | May 19, 2021

Family Vaccine FAQs

Q: Is the CG vaccinating dependents?
A.  Yes, the CG has now included dependents in the vaccination plan.  CG dependent family members are key to the readiness of the Active and Reserve force.  CG clinics will vaccinate dependents in communities where there is demand and the vaccine is not readily available from civilian providers , DoD Medical Treatment Facilities, or other sources.  Dependents who request the vaccine from a CG clinic are required to provide proof of dependent status.

 

Q: How do I find out if my local CG clinic will vaccinate my dependents?
A. Please contact your local CG clinic to determine if they are administering COVID-19 vaccinations to dependents. To find the contact information for local CG clinics, download the Heath, Safety, Work-Life Service Center (HSWL SC) app. For iPhone users: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/uscg-hswl/id669218420?mt=8. For Android users: https://cglink.uscg.mil/9db8da1e.

Alternately, you may contact the clinics directly using the list below.

Pfizer sites open to 12 years old and up:

 

USCG Academy Clinic, New London

860-444-8402

USCG Clinic Alameda

510-437-5999

USCG Clinic Baltimore

410-636-7506

USCG Clinic Base Miami

305-535-4535

USCG Clinic Boston

617-223-3121

USCG Clinic Cape Cod

508-968-6582

USCG Clinic Cape May

609-898-6366

USCG Clinic Mobile

251-441-6725

USCG Clinic National Capitol Region

202-372-4100

USCG Clinic New Orleans

504-253-4671

USCG Clinic Petaluma

707-765-7200

USCG Clinic Portsmouth

757-483-8596

Moderna sites open to 18 years old and up:

 

USCG Clinic Air Station Miami

305-953-2266

USCG Clinic Astoria

503-861-6240

USCG Clinic Base Miami

305-535-4535

USCG Clinic Borinquen

787-890-8477

USCG Clinic Clearwater

727-535-1437

USCG Clinic Detroit

586-239-3005

USCG Clinic Houston/Galveston

281-464-4611

USCG Clinic Humboldt Bay

707-839-6176

USCG Clinic Jacksonville

904-594-6864

USCG Clinic Juneau

907-463-2140

USCG Clinic Key West

305-292-8715

USCG Clinic Kodiak

907-487-5757

USCG Clinic LA/LB

301-521-6069

USCG Clinic New York

718-354-4414

USCG Clinic Port Angeles

360-417-5894

USCG Clinic Portsmouth

757-483-8596

USCG Clinic San Diego

619-278-7133

USCG Clinic San Juan

787-729-2305

USCG Clinic Seattle

206-217-6432

USCG Clinic Traverse City

231-922-8282

 

Q. Will TRICARE beneficiaries, including military retirees, have access to the vaccine?
A. Yes. TRICARE beneficiaries empaneled at a DoD Military Treatment Facility (MTF) are eligible to receive the vaccine at a DoD MTF. TRICARE beneficiaries who receive care at DoD MTFs on a space-available basis can alternately receive vaccine through the local civilian medical providers. Coast Guard clinics will not be directly vaccinating dependents, so Coast Guard dependents have the options of getting vaccinated through their TRICARE physician, civilian pharmacy, or DoD MTF. 

 

Q. Are pregnant women who contract COVID-19 at an increased risk for severe illness and death?
A. For over a year, CDC identified pregnant women as a population at increased risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19, due to their naturally heightened inflammatory responses, when compared to non-pregnant peers. Further studies demonstrated pregnant women with symptomatic COVID-19 are at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth, compared with pregnant women without COVID-19. In the U.S, over 86,877 pregnant women have contracted COVID-19 and 14,745 (17%) required hospitalization.

 

Q. Are the vaccines safe for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding?
A. There is no evidence that Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech, or J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccines pose risk during pregnancy, or infertility for animals that received a vaccine prior to becoming pregnant, or during pregnancy, on future ability to conceive.  There is no history of any vaccine causing infertility.  Protection against infection through maternal antibodies passed to infants during pregnancy or through breast-feeding can be conferred from mom to baby.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses the Pfizer-BioNTech (Pfizer) and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines for use in pregnant and lactating women. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) protocols for new drug research prevented enrollment of pregnant women during the original Pfizer and Moderna vaccine trials. However, hundreds of women enrolled in those studies during 2020 became pregnant, and birth outcomes were tracked without incident. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Society for Maternal and Fetal Medicine advocated for vaccine availability and autonomy for pregnant and lactating women to choose whether to become vaccinated based on personal and community risk factors. To date, over 94,000 women report being pregnant and vaccinated to the CDC.

The J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine is a viral vector vaccine, meaning it uses a modified version of a different virus (the vector) to deliver important instructions to our cells. Vaccines that use the same viral vector have been given to pregnant people in all trimesters of pregnancy, including in a large-scale Ebola vaccination trial. No adverse pregnancy-related outcomes, including adverse outcomes affecting the infant, were associated with vaccination in these trials. Learn more about how viral vector vaccines work.  Regarding the J&J/Janssen vaccine, the known and potential benefits outweigh the known and potential risks.  However, women under age 50 should be aware of the rare risk of blood clots associated with low platelet count, and that other COVID-19 vaccine options are available where this risk has not been seen.

On 21 April, 2021, the New England Journal of Medicine published “Preliminary Findings of mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine Safety in Pregnant Persons”, which can be read at the following link: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2104983.

 

Q. Should children get the vaccine?
A. As of May 10, 2021, according to The Food and Drug Administration, everyone 12 years of age and older is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccination. People 12 years and older can receive the Pfizer vaccine. People 18 years and older can receive the Moderna and Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine.

Clinical trials for children younger than 12 are currently underway from both Pfizer and Moderna.  That data could be submitted for FDA review as early as September.

COVID-19 | Jan. 25, 2021

Retirees Vaccine FAQ

Q. Will retired Coast Guard beneficiaries have access to the vaccine?
A. Retirees should anticipate receiving the vaccine the same way they would receive any other vaccine – either through a Veterans Health Administration location, a DoD Military Treatment Facility (MTF), or from their primary care provider.

COVID-19 | May 5, 2021

Vaccine Side Effects FAQs

 

Q. If a Coast Guard military member chooses to receive the COVID-19 vaccine while it is under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and suffers lasting side effects, will the Veterans Administration (VA) cover any long-term issues caused by the EUA vaccine?
A. Yes. If a member chooses to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and suffers lasting side effects, long-term issues would be covered by the Veterans Administration (VA). 

 

Q: I previously received the Johnson and Johnson (J&J)/Janssen vaccine. Should I be worried?
A. The syndrome that occurred in a rare number of cases is called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, also known as clotting associated with low platelet counts. The symptoms include headache, vision changes, or symptoms of a stroke. These events have been extremely rare. Most of the rare cases that occurred happened between approximately one to two weeks after receiving the shot. The following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory provides additional information on the J&J vaccine, including what you should do if you experience side effects: https://www.fda.gov/media/146305/download.

 

Q: What should I do if I received the J&J vaccine and experience these rare symptoms?
A. If you received the vaccine in the last 14 days and develop stroke-like symptoms, have trouble breathing, or you are bruising easily, please contact your primary care provider. If your symptoms are severe, or if you are experiencing shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling, or persistent abdominal pain, call 911. The following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory provides additional information on the J&J vaccine, including what you should do if you experience side effects: https://www.fda.gov/media/146305/download.

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