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DEEPWATER HORIZON FAQS

1. Is Deepwater Horizon a contingency?
2. How long may I serve under my current Title 14 recall orders?
3. I know Title 14 is an involuntary recall, but I want to volunteer! Why can't I just go on ADOS?
4. What are the various recall authorities, and why are there so many kinds of them?
5. How do the various kinds of recalls affect my pay and benefits?
6. Why can't I get involuntary "T-10" orders?
7. What do I do if I've been recalled and have an unrealistically low limit on my government travel charge card?
8. How will my recall affect my drilling status?
9. I have more than 16 years combined active service and want to be part of this response. What can I do?
10. Why wouldn't SATO accept my message orders to make my travel reservations?
11. How should the mobilization process work?
12. What if I performed travel before my orders came through in Direct Access?
13. How can I volunteer?
14. Where can I get detailed mobilization/demobilization information?
15. Are Coast Guard Selected Reservists eligible for Transition Management Assistance Program (TAMP) in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?
16. Can I get legal assistance services from the Coast Guard BEFORE I am on active duty?
17. Does T14 recall meet my annual training requirement for satisfactory participation?
18. Do I get a DD-214 for T14 recall?
19. As a Federal Civilian Employee, do I qualify for the extra days of military leave for T14 recall?
20. When do I have to start drilling again after I come home from DWH?
21. When do I have to go back to my civilian job after I come home from DWH?
22. Does my home unit or my supervisor at DWH complete my employee review?
QUESTION ANSWER
1. Is Deepwater Horizon a contingency? No. Contingencies are issued under Title 10.
2. How long may I serve under my current Title 14 recall orders? Selected Reservists involuntarily recalled under Title 14 (14 USC 712) for the Deepwater Horizon response may serve for an initial 60-day period. At the end of that 60 days, you must be given 60 days of "dwell" time back home before being eligible to be recalled again under Title 14. You may not be recalled under Title 14 to serve for more than 60 days within a four-month period or for more than 120 days within a two-year period.
3. I know Title 14 is an involuntary recall, but I want to volunteer! Why can't I just go on ADOS? You may get that opportunity. Title 14 is the standard means of bringing Selected Reservists on active duty quickly in this kind of emergency. As Reservists near the end of their Title 14 recall, some of them who possess critical skills and desire to continue their active duty service may be invited to accept voluntary (ADOS) orders. These offers will be made based on consideration of specific mission needs and all options for meeting those needs.
4. What are the various recall authorities, and why are there so many kinds of them? Congress has granted different recall authorities to deal with the various kinds of emergencies in which the country might need its reserve forces, and it has set up different rules and conditions for each. In general, they intended to balance the nation's need for reserve forces with the Reservist's need for predictability and control of their civilian lives. The three most common involuntary recall authorities the Coast Guard uses are:
Domestic Emergencies (14 USC 712): Recalls for up to 60 days in a four-month period or 120 days in a two-year period. Used in Katrina and Deepwater Horizon.
Presidential Call Up (10 USC 12304): Recalls for up to 365 days. Used for the Haiti earthquake and Desert Shield.
Presidential Declaration of National Emergency (10 USC 12302): Recalls for up to 24 months. Used in Desert Storm, OIF, and OEF.
5. How do the various kinds of recalls affect my pay and benefits? As long as your recall orders are for more than 30 days, your pay, allowances, leave accrual, and benefits are identical to those of the active component regardless of which recall authority you serve under. There is one exception involving the early reserve retirement credit credit for service under an involuntary recall; however, the Coast Guard has submitted a legislative change proposal to correct what we believe is an unintentional wrinkle in the law.
6. Why can't I get involuntary "T-10" orders? Involuntary Title 10 recalls do offer some benefits advantages (i.e., Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits and post-recall transition Tri-Care eligibility) over Title 14 recalls. However, we do not have authority to issue involuntary Title 10 orders for domestic emergencies like Deepwater Horizon. Those orders are reserved for DOD-designated contingency operations.
7. What do I do if I've been recalled and have an unrealistically low limit on my government travel charge card? Your unit's mobilization process should include verifying and adjusting the limits on government travel charge cards, and the Reserve program is making sure this action is on all mobilization check lists. If you've already mobilized with an inadequate limit, you should contact the government travel charge card coordinator at your home or deployment PSSU.
8. How will my recall affect my drilling status? After you serve under your recall orders, you may resume your drills during your "dwell" time, and you can make up the drills you missed. However, you have no obligation to drill during the time you were on active duty.
9. I have more than 16 years combined active service and want to be part of this response. What can I do? The Reserve program has granted a blanket waiver permitting Reservists with more than 16 years combined active service to be recalled, provided they will have less than 17 years active service at the end of the recall. If you have more active service than that, you must follow the normal waiver process.
10. Why wouldn't SATO accept my message orders to make my travel reservations? Your orders aren't official until they are in Direct Access. SATO shouldn't accept, and personnel shouldn't perform travel, until the orders are in Direct Access.
11. How should the mobilization process work? You should receive two initial notifications: an email from MRTT and a verbal notification from your home command, which must give you at least 48 hours to report. During that 48 hours, your command should execute its mobilization checklist, working with your PSSU to complete orders in Direct Access. You should perform no travel until the orders are approved in Direct Access.
12. What if I performed travel before my orders came through in Direct Access? You should immediately report to the Logistics cell and the PSSU. Getting your orders in Direct Access is the only way to ensure you are paid and given credit for your service.
13. How can I volunteer? For volunteer opportunities go to MRTT Volunteer Bulletin Board.
14. Where can I get detailed mobilization/demobilization information? For detailed information on mobilization and demobilization information see the T14 Mob/Demob Guide.
15. Are Coast Guard Selected Reservists eligible for Transition Management Assistance Program (TAMP) in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill? No, TAMP is only authorized for designated Contingency Operations under Title 10 US Code Section 1145(a).  TAMP eligibility can be found at http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/10/usc_sec_10_00001145----000-.html .  Designated contingencies are defined in Title 10 US Code Section 101 and are available at  http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/10/usc_sec_10_00000101----000-.html.  An excellent information web site on TAMP is the TriCare West web site: www.TriWest.com/NGR.
16. Can I get legal assistance services from the Coast Guard BEFORE I am on active duty? If you need legal assistance services to become mobilization ready and you expect to be mobilized in the near future, you are eligible for legal assistance services from the Coast Guard.  Call your district Legal Assistance office to schedule an appointment with an attorney.

CG Legal Assistance: http://www.uscg.mil/legal/la/Legal_Assistance_Home.asp

CG Legal Services Command: http://www.uscg.mil/lsc/legal_assistance_program.asp

US Armed Forces Legal Assistance Locator: http://legalassistance.law.af.mil/content/locator.php

Legal Assistance Links & District Legal Information
17. Does T14 recall meet my annual training requirement for satisfactory participation? All active duty in support of a Coast Guard or Department of Defense mission may meet the 12-day annual training requirement for satisfactory participation per Chapter 4.C of the Reserve Policy Manual. You may also complete your regularly scheduled ADT-AT on a funds available basis.
18. Do I get a DD-214 for T14 recall? A DD-214 is not issued for T14 recall. Active duty must be 90 days or longer, or any length of duty in support of a contingency, to qualify for a DD-214. T14 recall is a maximum of 60 days by law and does not qualify as contingency duty.
19. As a Federal Civilian Employee, do I qualify for the extra days of military leave for T14 recall? Federal Civilian Employees are entitled to use BOTH the 15 days of military leave under 5 USC 6323(a) AND the 22 days of law enforcement/contingency leave under 5 USC 6323(b) to cover their absence from federal civilian employment, without loss of pay, time, or performance or efficiency rating.
20. When do I have to start drilling again after I come home from DWH? You must return to regularly scheduled drilling activities at your home unit within 30 days of return from T14 recall to maintain satisfactory participation standards under Chapter 4.C of the Reserve Policy Manual. Contact your chain of command as soon as possible if you need additional time before returning to a regular drill schedule.
21. When do I have to go back to my civilian job after I come home from DWH? Under the Uniformed Services Employment & Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), you must return to your civilian employment after active duty on the following schedule:

Active Duty:
1-30 days                   Next scheduled shift AFTER 8 hours rest
31-180 days               14 days or less
181+ days                  90 days or less

If you have more questions, contact ESGR at www.ESGR.mil or 1-800-366-4590.
22. Does my home unit or my supervisor at DWH complete my employee review? Your home unit completes your EER, although your DWH supervisor provides input to your home unit.
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Last Modified 12/13/2013