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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions: North American Emission Control Area (ECA)

When can a ship use plastic waste receptacles?
IAW the unified interpretations in reference to SOLAS II-2 4.4.2 Waste Receptacles
" This regulation is not intended to preclude the use of containers constructed of combustible materials in galleys, pantries, bars, garbage handling or storage spaces and incinerator rooms provided they are intended purely for the carriage of wet waste, glass bottles and metal cans and are suitably marked."

When should the USCG issue a C.O.C. for tenders?
If lifeboats used as tenders are listed as being in full compliance with SOLAS and LSA requirements on the Record of Equipment for the Passenger Ship Safety Certificate (PSSC), this satisfies the requirements for individual lifeboats to hold a PSSC.  Additionally, at initial and annual control verification exams (also known as Passenger Vessel COC exams), units are not required to issue a COC to such lifeboats when these lifeboats are listed on the Record of Equipment for the vessels PSSC. Where tenders maintained onboard the vessel are not lifeboats and are issued a PSSC or Lifeboat/Tender Safety Equipment Certificate, units shall issue a COC to each such tender after satisfactory examination.

Contact Mr. John Sedlak with questions.

Where can I find the requirements for control of discharge while in port?
Sewage discharge is addressed in 33 CFR Part 159.7 as follows:
When operating a vessel on a body of water where the discharge of treated or untreated sewage is prohibited by the Environmental Protection Agency under 40 CFR 140.3 or 140.4, the operator must secure each Type I or Type II device in a manner which prevents discharge of treated or untreated sewage. Acceptable methods of securing the device include:

When operating a vessel on a body of water where the discharge of untreated sewage is prohibited by the Environmental Protection Agency under 40 CFR 140.3, the operator must secure each Type III device in a manner which prevents discharge of sewage. Acceptable methods of securing the device include:

What happens after concept review?
Before a single piece of steel is ever cut, laid or welded, a Naval Architect(s) at a shipyard will design a ship to its customers (the cruise line) specifications.  These plans are submitted to MSC for plan review.  In this portion of the process the Coast Guard will evaluate the ship’s “as built” design.  These plans must be approved by the ship’s Flag Administration before submittal to MSC.  Structure and design features are evaluated during this process including, but not limited to: structural fire protection, passenger egress routes for evacuation during an emergency, space categorization, fire fighting arrangements and preliminary vessel stability calculations.

When does the ship begin construction; what does the Coast Guard examine during construction?
At this point in the process the ship is a living breathing entity.  Its shape is formed, its engines are running and the construction process is well underway.  The Coast Guard will examine the internal arrangements on the vessel, evaluating the evacuation routes to ensure their practicality as well as the vessels internal boundaries where proper division and segregation will be examined to ensure each space is protected based on their individual fire risk.  On new construction, this is less invasive due to the ships “in construction” state as these items are openly exposed;  however, on an existing vessel the “finishing touches” of a vessel such as ceiling panels and walls must be removed to conduct these types of examinations.

 


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Last Modified 10/31/2014