U.S. Coast Guard Lightships

& Those of the U.S. Lighthouse Service


U.S. Lightship Station Assignments

(Stations are listed alphabetically, with dates that the station was in service and general locations noted, along with a list of each light ship that was assigned to that particular station by dates of service.)


Note: 
We would like to extend our thanks to Doug Bingham, the Historian of the USCG Lightship Sailors Association, for his assistance in compiling this list of lightship station assignments.  Our thanks too go to the pioneering lightship Historian of the service, Mr. Willard Flint.  This webpage is based primarily on his research and publications, including his seminal Lightships and Lightship Stations of the U.S. Government (Washington, DC: USCG, 1989).


Ambrose Channel, 1823-1967 

Location & historical notes: Ambrose Channel, New York, off the entrance to New York Bay, east and south of Sandy Hook, 6.2 miles and 097 degrees from the Sandy Hook Lighthouse.  

**While acting as a relief lightship for WLV-613, Relief Lightship LV-78 / WAL-505 was rammed and sunk on Ambrose Channel Station on 24 June 1960.

The station was replaced by the Ambrose Light Tower.  The station was originally named "Sandy Hook" from 1823-1908.  

Lightships assigned:

1823-1829: "V V "

1829-1838: station discontinued

1839-1854: "W W "

1854-1891: LV-16

1891-1894: LV-48

1894-1908: LV-51

1908-1932: LV-87 / WAL-512

1932-1952: LV-111 / WAL-533

1952-1967: WLV-613**  


Atchafalaya Bay, 1849-1859

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, off the entrance to Atchafalaya Bay, 7.3 miles - 306 degrees from Point Au Fer.  The station was considered to be unnecessary when the Southwest Reef Lighthouse was activated.

Lightships assigned:

1849-1859?: Vessel marking the station was referred to as "Atchafalaya."  No other designation was found.  Probably a sister to the Galveston lightship built in the same year.


Ballard Reef, 1893-1899

Location & historical notes: Michigan, in the Detroit River, probably about 400 yards off the east dies of Grosse Isle at what was then the east end of Ballard Reef.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1899: LV-63 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Bar Point Shoal, 1823-1919

Location & historical notes: In Canadian waters near Detroit , Michigan.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1910: LV-59

1911-1919: LV-62


Barnegat, 1927-1969

Location & historical notes: Off the New Jersey coast, 8 miles offshore east of Barnegat Inlet.  The station was established to provide a leading mark for the point where a course change is required by north-south coastal traffic to and from New York.  

Lightships assigned:

1927-1942: LV-79 / WAL-506

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1967: LV-79 / WAL-506

1967-1969: LV-110 / WAL-532


Bartlett Reef,1835-1933

Location & historical notes: Connecticut, in 66 feet of water, about 3 1/2 miles southwesterly from New London Lighthouse; also known as "Bartlett's Reef" in early years.  Discontinued in 1933 as "no longer considered necessary."

Lightships assigned:

1835-1848: "L"

1848-1867: LV-17

1867-1933: LV-13


Bishop & Clerks, 1856-1858

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, south and east of Hyannis Harbor, 2 1/2 miles south of Point Gammon, guarding the southern extremity of a dangerous group of rocks called Bishop and Clerks.  Station was replaced by the Bishop and Clerks Lighthouse, since discontinued and replaced by a pyramidal day-beacon.

Lightships assigned:

1856-1858: LV-4 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Blunts Reef, 1905-1971

Location & historical notes: California, off Cape Mendocino, about 1.9 miles and 239 degrees from Blunts Reef and 4.55 miles and 266 degrees from Cape Mendocino Light.  The station was replaced by the Blunts Reef Lighted Horn Buoy "B."

Lightships assigned:

1905-1930: LV-83 / WAL-508

1930-1942: LV-100 / WAL-523

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1959: LV-100 / WAL-523

1960-1969: WLV-605

1969-1971: WLV-612


Boston, 1894-1975

Location & historical notes: Reference mark for Boston harbor approaches; originally in 84 feet of water about 6 1/4 miles ESE of Boston Light, Massachusetts.

Lightships assigned:

1894-1940: LV-54 / WAL-502

1940-1942: LV-81 / WAL-507

1942-1943: marked by a buoy during World War II

1943-1946: LV-54 / WAL-502

1946-1951: LV-81 / WAL-507

1951-1962: LV-85 / WAL-510

1962-1972: LV-118 / WAL-539

1972-1975: WLV-189


Bowlers Rock, 1835-1868

Location & historical notes: Virginia, in the upper Rappahonnock River, about 34 miles above its entrance into the Chesapeake Bay, and about 8 1/2 miles downriver from the town of Tappahannock.  Moored on the easterly side of the channel to mark a rock off Bowlers Wharf.  The station was no longer needed when Bowlers Rock Lighthouse was activated about one mile upriver from the lightship station.  LV "O" was captured by Confederate forces in 1861.  This lightship's ultimate fate remains unknown.

Lightships assigned:

1835-1861: "O "

1861-1863: station vacant

1864-1868: LV-28


Brandywine Shoal, 1823-1850

Location & historical notes: Delaware, in the Delaware Bay, about 12 miles above the entrance, and one mile west of Brandywine Shoal, marking the east side of the main channel as a guide for passing clear of the shoal area.  The station was replaced by the Brandywine Shoal Lighthouse, which was established one mile eastward from the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1823-1850: "N "


Brant Island Shoal, 1831-1863

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, on the southern section of the Pamlico Sound off the point of Brant Island Shoal, and 15.0 miles bearing 276 degrees from Ocracoke Light.  Used as a guide by east-west traffic in Pamlico Sound.  The station was replaced by the Brant Island Shoal Lighthous.

Lightships assigned:

1831- ?: ?

? -1863: "GG "


Brenton Reef, 1853-1962

Location & historical notes: Rhode Island, guarded Brenton Reef and served to mark the approaches to Narrangansett Bay, being positioned off its east passage, originally 3.5 miles bearing 124 degrees from Beavertail Lighthouse, then later moved southerly.  The station was replaced by the Brenton Reef Light tower, 0.6 miles bearing 270 degrees from the final lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1853-1856: LV-14

1856-1897: LV-11

1897-1935: LV-39

1935-1962: LV-102 / WAL-525


Brunswick, 1907-1929

Location & historical notes: Georgia, marked the approaches to Brunswick; positioned southeasterly from Jekyll Island and 14 miles bearing 124 degrees from St. Simons Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by the Brunswick lighted whistle buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1907-1929: LV-84 / WAL-509 (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Buffalo, 1912-1918 

Location & historical notes: New York, eastern end of Lake Erie, about 13 miles off the entrance to Buffalo Harbor marking the approaches to Buffalo.  The station was replaced with the Buffalo Approach lighted bell buoy "B" and the Canadian Point Albino Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1912-1913: LV-82

? -1914: LV-96

1915-1918: LV-98 / WAL-521


Bush Bluff, 1891-1914

Location & historical notes: Virginia, lower Chesapeake Bay, in the Elizabeth River about three miles south of Sewells Point and 1 and 1/2 miles north of Craney Island.  Marked Bush Bluff Shoal and served as a guide for the transit of Norfolk Harbor Reach in the approaches to the harbors of Portsmouth and Norfolk.  The station was eventually replaced by bouyage.

Lightships assigned:

1891-1893: LV-46

1893-1895: information on which vessel was at this station is not clear

1895-1911: LV-97

1911-1912: marked by a buoy during World War II

1912-1918: LV-97


Buzzards Bay,1954-1961

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located 4.2 miles and 256 degrees from Cuttyhunk Light at the western entrance to Buzzards Bay.  The Vineyard Sound and Hen & Chickens stations were replaced simultaneously by the Buzzards Bay station which was established at a new location to better serve Buzzards Bay traffic lanes and at the same time serve as a reference mark for diminishing traffic using Vineyard Sound.  The station was eventually replaced by the Buzzards Bay Light tower.

Lightships assigned:

1954-1959: LV-86 / WAL-511

1959-1961: LV-110 / WAL-532


Calibogue Sound, 1855-1869

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, in the entrance to Calibouge Sound about 0.7 miles off the south end of Hilton Head Island and 2.6 miles and 204 degrees from the present Harbor Town Light.  The station served as a guide for passing between Grenadier and Barrett Shoals.  The station was replaced by the Daufuskie Island Range Lights which have since been discontinued.

Lightships assigned:

1855-1869: "K " (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Cape Charles (see Chesapeake)


Cape Elizabeth (see Portland)


Cape Hatteras (see Diamond Shoal)


Cape Lookout Shoals, 1905-1933

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, southeasterly from Beaufort, and 20.3 miles and 162 degrees from Cape Lookout Light.  The station was replaced with the Cape Lookout Bell Buoy "14," placed near the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1905-1924: LV-80

1924-933: LV-107 / WAL-529


Carysfort Reef, 1825-1852

Location & historical notes: Florida, in the Florida Straights off Key Largo.  Moored close in to the site of the present Carysfort Reef Light, which replaced this lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1825-1841: "AA "

1841-1852: " BB "


Charleston, 1854-1933 

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, at the entrance to Charleston Harbor, about 8 1/2 miles easterly from Fort Sumter off the east end of Rattlesnake Shoal.  Used as a guide for passing clear of Rattlesnake Shoal when entering Charleston Harbor.  Originally named Rattlesnake Shoal from 1854 through 1894.  Renamed Charleston on 31 May 1894.

Lightships assigned:

1854-1860: "E "

1861-1863: station vacant

1863-1871: LV-30

1871-1880: LV-38

1880-1886: LV-34

1886-1889: LV-32

1889-1892: LV-38

1892-1924: LV-34

1924-1933: LV-53 / WAL-501


Chesapeake, 1928-1965

Location & historical notes: Originally located 9.3 miles and 102 degrees from the Cape Charles Lighthouse, marking the north side of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay.  Moved southeasterly in 1922 in the interest of deeper draft vessels, and moved south in 1928 to conform with improvements in aids marking the approach lanes for Chesapeake Bay.  Final position was 15 miles and 078 degrees from the Cape Henry Lighthouse.  The station was ultimately replaced with the Chesapeake light tower, about 14 miles east of Cape Henry and 4.4 miles and 186 degrees from the final lightship station position.

The station was originally named Cape Charles, from 1888 through 1926 when it was renamed Chesapeake.

Lightships assigned:

1888-1891: LV-46

1891-1916: LV-49

1916-1924: LV-101 / WAL-524

1924-1927: LV-80

1927-1933: LV-72

1933-1942: LV-116 / WAL-538

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1965: LV-116 / WAL-538


Choptank River, 1870-1871

Location & historical notes: 

Lightships assigned:

1870-1871: LV-25 (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Columbia River, 1892-1979

Location & historical notes: Oregon, off the Columbia River entrance, southwesterly from Cape Disappointment.  Originally 4.4 miles and 232 degrees from Cape Disappointment Lighthouse but shortly thereafter moved three miles southwesterly.  The station was a leading mark for making the approach to the main channel entrance.  This was the first lightship station for the Pacific Coast, and the last of the west coast stations to be discontinued.  The station was ultimately replaced by a lighted horn buoy "CR" (LNB), about 0.2 miles north of the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1892-1897: LV-50

1897-1898: LV-67

1898-1899: LV-50

1899-1901: marked by a buoy

1901-1905: LV-50

1905-1906: LV-67

1906-1909: LV-50

1909-1939: LV-88 / WAL-513

1939-1951: LV-93 / WAL-517

1951-1979: WLV-604


Combahee Bank, 1859-1868

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, inside the St. Helena Sound off the south end of the Combahee Bank and about 200 yards southeast of the present Combahee Bank Light.  Used as a guide for passing between Combahee and Pelican Banks.  The station was replaced by the Combahee Bank Lighthouse, since replaced by another light of the same name, about 200 yards northwest of the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1859-1868: "A " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Cornfield Point, 1856-1957

Location & historical notes: Connecticut, southerly from the town of Old Saybrook, off Cornfield Point and the mouth of the Connecticut River, 3.3 miles and 211 degrees from Lynde Point Lighthouse.  Moored south of the center of Long Sand Shoal.  An important reference mark for traffic passing through Long Island Sound.  The station was replaced by a lighted bell buoy located about 2 miles northeasterly from the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1856-1872: LV-14

1872-1882: LV-12 (ex-LV-22 )

1882-1892: LV-23

1892-1894: LV-51

1894-1895: Relief LV-20

1895-1925: LV-48

1926-1939: LV-44

1939-1957: LV-118 / WAL-539


Craney Island, 1820-1859

Location & historical notes: Virginia, in the lower Chesapeake Bay, in the Elizabeth River off Craney Island opposite the port of Norfolk, marking the west side of Craney Island Beach.  Served as a guide in the approach to Norfolk and Portsmouth harbors.  The station was replaced by the Craney Island Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1820-1859: "C" (The only lightship to occupy this station).


Cross Ledge (see Upper Middle)


Cross Rip, 1828-1963

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, originally positioned off the northeast end of Tuckernuck Shoal in the approaches to Nantucket Harbor, then moved westward off Cross Rip Shoal.  An important waypoint during transit of Nantucket Sound, being at the narrowest part of the channel flanked by Cross Rip Shoal to the south and Horseshoe Shoal to the north.  Moored 7.4 miles and 077 degrees from Cape Poge Lighthouse on Martha's Vineyard.

The station was originally named Tuckernuck Shoal from 1828-1852, then moved and renamed Cross Rip.

Lightships assigned:

1828-1864: "H"

1864-1866: "G"

1867-1915: LV-5

1915-1918: LV-6

1918-1922: LV-20

? - 1923: LV-47

1923-1934: LV-66

1934-1937: LV-72

1937-1954: LV-96 / WAL-520

1954-1958: LV-110 / WAL-532

1958-1962: LV-118 / WAL-539

1962-1963: LV-102 / WAL-525


Dames Point, 1857-1863

Location & historical notes: Florida, in the St. Johns River about five miles above the entrance.  The station was replaced by the Dames Point Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1857-1863: "Y " (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Delaware, 1960-1970

Location & historical notes: Delaware, southeasterly from the entrance to the Delaware Bay, 17 miles and 089 degrees from the Fenwick Island Lighthouse, moored in 100 feet of water.  The station was replaced by the Delaware Lighted Horn Buoy "D," a LNB.

Lightships assigned:

1960-1965: LV-107 / WAL-529

1965-1970: LV-116 / WAL-538


Diamond Shoal, 1824-1966

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, off Diamond Shoal.  In 1897 the station's position was 15 miles and 128 degrees from the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.  The lightship was an extremely important mark for north-south coastwise traffic.

The station was replaced by the Diamond Shoal Light Tower.

Lightships assigned:

1824-1827: Cape Hatteras Lightship on station

1827-1897: station vacant

1897-1901: LV-69 & LV-71

1901-1918: LV-71 & LV-72

1918-1922: LV-72

1922-1942: LV-105 / WAL-527

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1947: LV-114 / WAL-536

1947-1966: WLV-189


Eel Grass Shoal, 1849-1884

Location & historical notes: Connecticut, in Fishers Island Sound off Mystic.  The station was replaced by the Latimer Reef Lightouse.

Lightships assigned:

1849 - ?: "L"

? - 1871: LV-12 (I)

1871-1872: LV-12 (ex- LV-22 )

1872-1877: LV-25

1877-1882: LV-17

1882-1884: LV-12 (ex-LV-22 )


Eleven Foot Shoal, 1893-1936

Location & historical notes: In Lake Michigan at the northern end of Green Bay, southeasterly from Escanaba and northwesterly from Washington Island.  The station was eventually replaced by the Eleven Foot Shoal Light Station.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1925: LV-60

1926-1936: LV-82


Fenwick Island Shoal, 1888-1933

Location & historical notes: Delaware, originally positioned 7.8 miles and 096 degrees from Fenwick Island Lighthouse, east of Fenwick Island Shoal.  The station was replaced with a lighted whistle buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1888-1892: LV-37

1892-1930: LV-52

1930-1933: LV-116 / WAL-538


Fire Island, 1896-1942

Location & historical notes: New York, about 40 miles eastward of the entrance to New York harbor, and about nine miles off Fire Island.  The station was replaced by buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1896-1897: LV-58

1897-1930: LV-68

1930-1942: LV-114 / WAL-536


Fishing Rip, 1863-1869

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, in Port Royal Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1863-1864: "V "

1864-1866: ?

1866-1868: Relief LV-34

1868-1869: LV-33


Five Fathom Bank, 1837-1972

Location & historical notes: New Jersey, off the south end of Five Fathom Bank, 14.7 miles and 100 degrees from the Cape May Lighthouse.  The station was ultimately replaced by a lighted horn buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1837-1839: report in the 1837 Coast Pilot of a decaying and leaking "lightboat" on station

1839-1869: LV-18

1869-1876: LV-37

1877-1904: LV-40

1904-1924: LV-79 / WAL-506

1924-1942" LV-108 / WAL-530

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1970: LV-108 / WAL-530

1970-1971: LV-110 / WAL-532

1971-1972: WLV-189


Fourteen Foot Bank, 1876-1886

Location & historical notes: Delaware, in the Delaware Bay about 16 miles above the entrance.  After the Fourteen Foot Bank Lighthouse was constructed the lightship station was discontinued.

Lightships assigned:

22 August 1876-1 December 1886: LV-19


Frying Pan Shoal, 1860-1964

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, off the outer end of the extensive shoals marking out nearly 17 miles south and east of Cape Fear.  Served as a guide for passing clear of the shoal area in the approach to the Cape Fear River which accessed Southport and Wilmington.  The station was eventually replaced by the Frying Pan Shoal Light Tower which was established 1.7 miles and 309 degrees from the final position of the lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1854-1860: "D "

1860-1863: station vacant although in 1860 the LV-8 was assigned to Frying Pan but prior to being placed on station, was seized and sunk in Cape Fear River by Confederate forces (she was later raised, repaired and towed north by tender Iris in 1866).

1863-1864: LV-32

1863-1871: LV-29

1871-1875: LV-34

1875-1877: LV-29

1877-1883: LV-32

1883-1888: LV-38

1888-1892: LV-29

1892-1896: LV-53 / WAL-501

1896-1911: LV-1

1911-1930: LV-94 / WAL-518

1930-1942: LV-115 / WAL-537

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1964: LV-115 / WAL-537


Galveston, 1849-1906

Location & historical notes: Texas, at the entrance to Galveston Harbor.  It was replaced by buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1849- 1853: "XX "

1853-1854: station vacant

1854-1860: "XX "

1860-1870:  ? (station was thought to be vacant during this time frame)

1870-1906: LV-28


Grays Reef, 1891-1936

Location & historical notes: Michigan, on the northern edge of Lake Michigan, moored off the eastern end of Grays Reef.  The station was replaced by the Grays Reef Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1891-1923: LV-57

1924-1926: LV-103 / WAL-526

1927-1928: LV-56

? - 1929: LV-103 / WAL-526

1929-1936: LV-99 / WAL-522


Great Round Shoal, 1890-1932

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located 5.8 miles and 084 degrees from the Great Point Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by an improved buoyage marking Great Round Shoal channel.

Lightships assigned:

1890-1891: Relief LV-9

1891-1892: LV-47

1892-1913: LV-42

1913-1918: LV-86 / WAL-511

1918-1923: LV-66

1923-1932: LV-86 / WAL-511


Handkerchief Shoal, 1858-1951

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located near the eastern end of Nantucket Sound, guarding the extensive Handkerchief Shoal and serving as a reference mark for the western entrance to the Pollock Rip Channel.  Moored about 4.5 miles SSW of Monomoy Point and five miles northerly from Great Point Nantucket.  The station was replaced by a lighted whistle buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1858-1916: LV-4

1916-1923: LV-3

1923-1924: LV-41

1930-1951: LV-98 / WAL-521


Harbor Island, 1836-1867

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, in Pamlico Sound near the north end of Core Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1836-1861: "QQ "

1861-1863: station vacant

1863-1867: ?


Heald Bank, 1905-1936

Location & historical notes: Texas, southeasterly from the entrance to Galveston Harbor, 29.5 miles and 118 degrees from the present Galveston South Jetty Light.

Lightships assigned:

1905-1936: LV-81 / WAL-507 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Hedge Fence Shoal, 1908-1933

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located off Edgartown on Martha's Vineyard, 7.7 miles and 106 degrees from the Nobska Point Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1908-1910: LV-90 / WAL-514

1910-1915: LV-41

1915-1925: LV-9

1925-1930: LV-49

1930-1933: LV-41


Hen & Chickens, 1866-1954

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located one mile south of the Hen & Chickens Reef, about two miles off Horseneck Beach and 3.7 miles and 304 degrees from the Cuttyhunk Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1866-1867: LV-5

1867-1877: LV-8

1877-1907: LV-2

1908-1913: LV-86 / WAL-511

1913-1932: LV-42

1932-1933: LV-74

1933-1934: LV-49

1934-1954: LV-86 / WAL-511


Hog Island Shoal, 1885-1901

Location & historical notes: Rhode Island, in upper Narragansett Bay off Hog Island Shoal at the junction of Narragansett Bay and Mount Hope Bay.  The station was replaced by the Hog Island Shoal Lighthouse.  A buoy marked this location as early as 1838 and remained there until replaced by a floating light at this approximate position, privately maintained by the Old Colony Steamboat Company during the period 1866-1885, at which time the U.S. Government established the lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1885-1901: LV-12 (ex-LV-22 )


Hoopers Straight, 1827-1867

Location & historical notes: Maryland, on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay, north of Bloodsworth Island, opposite the Honga River entrance.  The station was disestablished after the Hoopers Island Lighthouse was activated.

Lightships assigned:

1827-1867: LV-25


Horseshoe Shoal, 1851-1870

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, in the Cape Fear River, about four miles upriver from Southport and two miles above the entrance to Price Creek.

Lightships assigned:

1851-1870: "UU " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Janes Island, 1853-1867

Location & historical notes: Maryland, on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay, between Smith Island and the eastern shore of the Bay.  The station was no longer needed when the Janes Island Lighthouse was activated.

Lightships assigned:

1853-1867: ?


Key West (see Northwest Passage


Lake Huron, 1893-1970

Location & historical notes: Michigan, at the south end of Lake Huron off the entrance to the St. Clair River, and 3.0 miles and 009 degrees from Fort Gratiot Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1920: LV-61

1921-1935: LV-96 / WAL-520

1936-1970: LV-103 / WAL-526


Lake St Clair, 1887-1939

Location & historical notes: Michigan, in Lake St. Clair, originally 1.5 miles and 098 degrees from the present Grosse Pointe Club Dock South Light.  Later moved about seven miles northeasterly and positioned on the westerly side of the dredged channel to mark a turn.  The station was replaced by the Lake St. Clair Light.

Lightships assigned:

1887-1902: LV-10

1902-1939: LV-75


Lansing Shoal, 1901-1928

Location & historical notes: Michigan, on northern Lake Michigan, west of the Straights of Mackinac and northwesterly from Garden Island.  The station was replaced by the Lansing Shoal Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1901-1920: LV-55

1920-1928: LV-98 / WAL-521


Lime Kiln Crossing North, 1893-1910

Location & historical notes: Lower Detroit River in Canadian waters; the station continued to be maintained by the Canadian government from 1910-1913 when it was then discontinued and replaced by buoyage and range lights.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1910: LV-65 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Lime Kiln Crossing South, 1893-1910

Location & historical notes: Lower Detroit River in Canadian waters; the station continued to be maintained by the Canadian government from 1910-1913 when it was then discontinued and replaced by buoyage and range lights.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1910: LV-64 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Long Shoal, 1825-1867

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, located about 15 miles east of the town of Engelhard in the northern part of Pamlico Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1825-1861: "JJ "

1861-1864: station vacant

1864-1867: "KK "


Lower Cedar Point, 1825-1867

Location & historical notes: Maryland, in the section of the Potomac River referred to as the "narrows of the Potomac," about 40 miles upriver from the Chesapeake Bay.  Moored on the westerly side of the channel, off the present Naval Proving Ground at Dahlgren, Virginia, and about one mile south of the highway bridge for Route 301.  The station was discontinued after the Lower Cedar Point Lighthouse came into operation.

Lightships assigned:

1825-1861: "DD "

1861-1864: station vacant

1864-1867: LV-24


Mackinaw Straits, 1832-1851

Location & historical notes: Michigan, in northern Lake Michigan in the western approaches to the Straits of Mackinac.  The station was replaced by the Waugoshance Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1832-1851: "YY " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Martin Reef, 1909-1927

Location & historical notes: Michigan, in northern Lake Michigan, about 8 1/2 miles southeasterly from Marquette Island and south of Martins Reef.  The station was replaced by the Martin Reef Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1909-1927: LV-89 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Martins Industry, 1839-1922

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, off the entrance to Port Royal Sound about 15 miles eastward from Tybee Light. 

In 1922, the Martins Industry Station was discontinued, with the lightship being moved to establish the Savannah Station concurrently.  See the Savannah Station entry below.

Lightships assigned:

1839-1855: "K "

1856-1861: LV-35

1861-1862: station vacant

1862-1864: LV-33

1864-1871: LV-32

1871-1875: LV-29

1876-1880: LV-34

1880-1887: LV-29

1887-1892: LV-34

1892-1896: LV-1

1896-1906: LV-53 / WAL-501

1906-1911: LV-29

1911-1922: LV-1


Merrills Shell Bank, 1847-1860

Location & historical notes: Mississippi, southwesterly from Gulfport, off Pass Christian and the entrance to Bay St. Louis.  The lightship was captured by Confederate forces.

Lightships assigned:

1847-1860: "W " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Milwaukee, 1912-1932

Location & historical notes: Wisconsin, on the west side of Lake Michigan off Milwaukee.

Lightships assigned:

1912-1932: LV-95 / WAL-519 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Minots Ledge, 1851-1860

Location & historical notes: Southerly from the entrance to Boston Harbor, the station was located seaward (0.8miles - 360 degrees) from Minots Ledge Lighthouse to serve as a temporary replacement for the steel skeleton lighthouse destroyed during a storm in 1851.

Lightships assigned:

1851 - ?: Steam tug R.B. Forbes

1851 - 1854: "N"

1854-1860: LV-7


Nantucket Shoals, 1854-1983

Location & historical notes: Originally referred to as "Nantucket New South Shoal" from 1854-1896; from 1896 through 1983 it was named "Nantucket Shoals."  This station marked the southern extremity of the extensive shoals that make out south and east from Nantucket Island.  It served as a primary leading mark for both coastwise and trans-Atlantic traffic.  It was located variously at distances from 20 to 50 miles from the nearest land.  It was repositioned several times to provide a greater safety margin from shoal areas, and to conform to changed in the international traffic lanes.  Nantucket Shoals was one of the most exposed lightship stations in the world and it was the last of the U.S. lightship stations to be discontinued.  

Lightships assigned:

1854-1855: LV-11

1856-1892: LV1

1892-1894: LV-54 / WAL-502

1894-1896: LV-58

1896-1907: LV-66

1907-1923: LV-85 / WAL-510

1923-1931: LV-106 / WAL-528

1931-1934: LV-117

1934-1936: LV-106 / WAL-528

1936-1942 LV-112 / WAL-534

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1958: LV-112 / WAL-534

1958-1960: WLV-196

1960-1975: LV-112 / WAL-534

1975-1983: WLV-612 (Nantucket 1)

1979-1983: WLV-613 (Nantucket 2)


Neuse River, 1828-1862

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, on the western part of Pamlico Sound, about 8 1/2 miles northeasterly from Oriental, North Carolina.

Lightships assigned:

1828-1862: "HH " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


New Orleans, 1965-1971

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, northeasterly from the Delta entrances, in Brenton Sound off the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet which runs just west of Lake Borgne.  The station marked the approach for entering the Gulf Outlet.  The station was replaced by the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Approach LHB "NO," located in 48 feet of water about four miles north of the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1965-1966: LV-109 / WAL-531

1966-1971: WLV-189


Nine Foot Shoal, 1827-1859

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, in the Pamlico Sound, 4.2 miles and 326 degrees from the Ocracoke Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by the Nine Foot Shoal Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1827-1859: "SS " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


North Manitou Shoal,1910-1935

Location & historical notes: Michigan, on the eastern side of Lake Michigan, south of North Manitou Island.  The station was replaced by the North Manitou Shoal Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1910-1926: LV-56

1927-1935: LV-89

1934-1935: LV-103 / WAL-526


Northeast End, 1882-1932

Location & historical notes: New Jersey, about 12 miles east of Hereford Inlet and 19.7 miles and 085 degrees from the Cape May Lighthouse.  The Five Fathom Bank Northeast Lighted Whistle Buoy "2FB" is close to the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1882-1926: LV-44

1926: Relief LV-79 marked the station briefly in 1926 between the departure of LV-44 and the arrival of the newly constructed LV-111.

1927-1932: LV-111 / WAL-533


Northeast Pass, 1820-1823

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, off the entrance to the Northeast Pass, Mississippi River Delta.

Lightships assigned:

1820-1823: "ZZ " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Northwest Passage, 1838-1854

Location & historical notes: Florida, about seven miles north and west from Key West.  The station was replaced by the Northwest Passage Lighthouse.

The station was also referred to as Key West.

Lightships assigned:

1838-1854: "NN " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Ocracoke Channel, 1852-1859

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, in the entrance to Ocracoke Inlet about 300 yards off the south end of Ocracoke Island.

Lightships assigned:

1852-1859: "TT " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Overfalls, 1898-1960

Location & historical notes: Delaware, off the south side of the entrance to the Delaware Bay, about 3.5 miles east of Cape Henlopen and 8.5 miles and 200 degrees from the Cape May Lighthouse.  The station was replaced by buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1898-1901: LV-46

1901-1925: LV-69

1926-1951: LV-101 / WAL-524

1951-1960: WLV-605


Peshtigo Reef, 1906-1935

Location & historical notes: Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan, on the west side of lower Green Bay, easterly from the mouth of the Peshtigo River.  The station was replaced with the Peshtigo Reef Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1906-1935: LV-77 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Poe Reef, 1893-1929

Location & historical notes: Michigan, on northern Lake Huron, southeast of Bois Blanc Island in the entrance to the South Channel, Straights of Mackinac.  The station was replaced by Poe Reef Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1910: LV-62

1911-1914: LV-59

1915-1920: LV-96 / WAL-520

1921-1929: LV-99 / WAL-522


Pollock Rip, 1849-1969

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, initially located at the junction of the natural Pollock Rip and Pollock Rip Slue channels, 8.3 miles and 159 degrees from the Chatham Light, and about 4 1/2 miles east of Monomoy Point.  Used as a guide for transiting the "Monomoy Passage" which accessed the eastern end of Nantucket Sound.  The route was heavily used by coastwise shipping to avoid an offshore passage seaward of Nantucket Shoals, but was subject to prolonged periods of heavy fog in the spring and summer months.  The station was discontinued for a short time in 1923, then reestablished about 2 1/4 miles northeast of the original station.  Channel is now seldom used commercially due to extreme shoaling.  

See the Pollock Rip Slue Station entry.

Lightships assigned:

1849-1875: LV-2

1875-1877: LV-40

1877-1892: LV-42

1892-1923: LV-47

1923: station was discontinued from 16 February through 16 October 1926

1923-1924: LV-73 /WAL-503

1924-1942: LV-110 /WAL532

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1947-1958: WLV-196

1958-1969: LV-114 / WAL-536


Pollock Rip Slue, 1902-1923

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, located 4.4 miles and 147 degrees from the Chatham Light.  It was initially established as a guide for transiting the Slue channel after shoaling at its north end resulted in many collisions and groundings.

The station was originally named "Pollock Rip Shoals" from 1902-1913 and was renamed "Pollock Rip Slue" on 19 August 1913.  It was moved south in 1923 to mark the entrance to a newly dredged channel.  The station was renamed "Pollock Rip" (see previous entry) on 16 October 1923.

Lightships assigned:

1902-1923: LV-73 / WAL-503 (The only lightship to occupy this location)


Portland, 1903-1971

Location & historical notes: Marking approaches to Portland Harbor, about five miles southeasterly from Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  The station was located 5.0 miles and 121 degrees from the present Cape Elizabeth Light tower.

The station was originally named "Cape Elizabeth" from 1903-1912.

Lightships assigned:

1903-1931: LV-74

1931-1942: LV-90

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1952: LV-90 / WAL-514

1952-1969: LV-111 / WAL-533

1969-1971: LV-114 / WAL-536

1971-1975: WLV-612


Ram Island, 1886-1925

Location & historical notes: Connecticut, moored in 42 feet of water off Ram Island Reef in Fishers Island Sound, south of the town of Mystic.  Located 1.9 miles and 267 degrees from Latimer Reef Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1886-1894: LV-19

1894-1925: LV-23


Roanoke Island, 1835-1861

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, near the junction of Albermarle and Croatan Sounds, about three miles westerly from the town of Manteo, 3.5 miles and 141 degrees from the present Croatan Sound Approach Light "3".  

Lightships assigned:

1835-1861: "RR " (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Roanoke River, 1835-1866

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, southeasterly from the town of Edenton, in western Albermarle Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1835-1861: "MM " (captured by Confederate forces)

1861-1863: station vacant

1863-1866: ?


Royal Shoal, 1826-1867

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, in Pamlico Sound off the southwest point of Royal Shoal and 8.8 miles and 273 degrees from the Okracoke Light.

Lightships assigned:

1826-1867: ? (The only lightship to occupy this station)


San Francisco, 1898-1971

Location & historical notes: Off San Francisco, 8.6 miles and 244 degrees from the Point Bonita Light.  The station marked the approaches to the main ship channel into San Francisco.  The original station position was described as being "3 1/4 miles outside the bar in 109 feet, with Alcatraz and Fort Point lighthouses in range."  The station was replaced by the San Francisco lighted horn (LNB) buoy "SF". 

Lightships assigned:

1898-1930: LV-70

1930-1942: LV-83 / WAL-508

1942-1945: station was left vacant during World War II

1945-1951: LV-83 / WAL-508

1951-1969: WLV-612

1969-1971: LV-100 / WAL-523


Sand Key, 1846-1853

Location & historical notes: Florida, about seven miles southwesterly from Key West, and about five miles westward from the entrance to the main ship channel to Key West.  Moored close in to Sand Key, and used as a reference mark for entering the Rock Key Channel, the Southwest Channel, and the Main Ship Channel.  The station was replaced by the Sand Key Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1846-1853: "PP " (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Savannah, 1922-1964

Location & historical notes: Georgia, positioned off the entrance to the Savannah River, 10.5 miles and 117 degrees from the Tybee Light.  

In 1922, the Martins Industry Station was discontinued, with the lightship being moved to establish the Savannah Station concurrently.

Lightships assigned:

1922-1930: LV-1

1930-1954: LV-94 / WAL-518

1954-1964: LV-109 / WAL-531


Scotland ( Wreck of ), 1868-1962

Location & historical notes: New Jersey, established in 1868 to mark the wreck of the SS Scotland.  The wreck was removed in 1870 and the station was discontinued.  Shipping interests considered the station necessary and therefore it was reestablished in 1874.  Moored 3.2 miles and 103 degrees from the Sandy Hook Lighthouse and about 4 1/2 miles westerly from the Ambrose lightship.  Used as a reference mark primarily by north-south coastwise traffic using the Sand Hook and Ambrose channels in the approaches to New York Bay.  The Scotland radio-beacon was said to have been widely used by commercial aircraft making an approach to Idlewild/JFK airport.  The station was replaced by the Scotland Lighted Horn Buoy "S," which was 0.4 miles and 143 degrees from the final lightship station, and was equipped with RACON and passing light.

Station was named "Wreck of Scotland" from 1868 through 1891 and was then renamed "Scotland."

Lightships assigned:

1868-1870: LV-20

1870-1874: station was discontinued

1874-1876: LV-23

1876-1880: LV-20

1881-1902: LV-7

1902-1925: LV-11

1925-1936: LV-69

1936-1942: LV-87 / WAL-512

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1947: LV-78 / WAL-505

1947-1962: LV-87 / WAL-512


Ship Shoal, 1849-1859

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, south of Caillou Bay, toward the west end of Ship Shoal and about one mile north of it.  The station was replaced by the Ship Shoal Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1849-1859: "F " (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Shovelful Shoal (see Stonehorse Shoal)


Simmons Reef, 1891-1900

Location & historical notes: Michigan, on the northern end of Lake Michigan in the western approaches to the Straights of Mackinac.  The lightship was moored off the south side of Simmons Reef, 9.25 miles and 325 degrees from the Waugoshance Light's abandoned tower.

Lightships assigned:

1891-1900: LV-55 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Smith Point, 1821-1897

Location & historical notes: Virginia, on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, off to the south side of the Potomac River entrance.  The lightship was moored about three miles offshore guarding the shoal area off Smith Point and served as a reference mark for the southern approach to the Potomac River, and as a waypoint for north-south traffic using the main Chesapeake Channel.  The station was no longer needed after the establishment of the Smith Point Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1821-1861: "B "

1861-1862: station vacant

1862-1868: LV-23

1868-1895: station remained vacant

1895-1897: LV-46


South Pass, 1894-1933

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, Off the entrance to the South Pass of the Mississippi River Delta.  Station was later considered unnecessary and discontinued.

Lightships assigned:

1894-1912: LV-43

1912-1918: station remained vacant from 1912 through the end of World War I

1918-1933: LV-102 / WAL-525


Southeast Shoal, 1901-1910

Location & historical notes: Ohio, on the western end of Lake Erie in Canadian waters.

Lightships assigned:

1901-1910: SS Kewaunee


Southwest Pass, 1912-1918

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, off the entrance to the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River Delta.  Station was later considered unnecessary and discontinued.

Lightships assigned:

1912-1917: LV-43

1917-1918: LV-102 / WAL-525


Sow & Pigs (see Vineyard Sound)


St. Helena Bar, 1838-1859

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, Off the entrance to St. Helena Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1838-1859: "A" (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


St. Johns River, 1929-1954

Location & historical notes: Florida, easterly from Jacksonville about five miles offshore, marking the approach for enetering the St Johns River, 6.5 miles and 092 degrees from the Mayport Tower.

Lightships assigned:

1929-1954: LV-84 / WAL-509 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Stonehorse Shoal, 1852-1963

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, about 1/2 mile off the southern end of Monomoy Point, at the eastern end of Nantucket Sound.  Positioned to mark a course change required when using Pollock Rip Channel.  Eventually replaced by a lighted horn buoy.

The station was originally named "Shovelful Shoal," from 1852-1916, then renamed "Stonehorse Shoal."

Lightships assigned:

1852-1916: LV-3

1916-1923: LV-5

1924-1934: LV-47

1934-1951: LV-53 / WAL-501

1951-1963: LV-101 / WAL-524


Stratford Shoal, 1838-1877

Location & historical notes: Connecticut, southerly from Bridgeport off Stratford Point. 

Lightships assigned:

1838-1877: LV-15 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Succonnessett Shoal, 1854-1912

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, served as a reference mark for vessels using the north channel of Nantucket Sound.

Lightships assigned:

1854-1855: ?

1855-1862: LV-13

1862-1912: LV-6


Swiftsure Bank, 1909-1961

Location & historical notes: Washington, seaward of the entrance to the Straight of San Juan de Fuca, on the southwest edge of Swiftsure Bank and 13.3 miles and 308 degrees from the Cape Flattery Lighthouse.  There was no replacement established when the station was discontinued.

Lightships assigned:

1909-1930: LV-93 / WAL-517

1930-1942: LV-113 / WAL-535

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1961: LV-113 / WAL-535


Tail of the Horseshoe, 1900-1922

Location & historical notes: Virginia, inside the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, 3.4 miles and 331 degrees from the Cape Henry Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1900-1901: LV-71

1901-1922: LV-46


Thirty Five Foot Channel, 1908-1919

Location & historical notes: Virginia, on the lower Chesapeake Bay, 10.9 miles and 331 degrees from the Cape Henry Lighthouse.

Lightships assigned:

1908-1918: LV-45

1918-1919: station was marked by a buoy during World War I


Trinity Shoal, 1881-1894

Location & historical notes: Louisiana, southerly from Vermilion Bay and Marsh Island, about 18 miles offshore.

Lightships assigned:

1881-1894: LV-43 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Tybee Island Knoll, 1848-1880

Location & historical notes: Georgia, inside the Savannah River, 0.7 miles and 340 degrees from the Tybee Lighthouse.  Replaced by range lights and buoyage.

Lightships assigned:

1848- ?: ?

? -1869: ?

1869-1872: LV-33

1872-1880: LV-21


Umatilla Reef, 1898-1971

Location & historical notes: Washington, about four miles seaward from Cape Alava and 2 1/2 miles southwest from Umatilla Reef.  Replaced by a lighted whistle buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1898-1905: LV-67

1905-1906: Relief LV-76

1906-1930: LV-67

1930-1939: LV-93 / WAL-517

1939-1942: LV-88 / WAL-513

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1959: LV-88 / WAL-513

1959-1961: marked by a buoy

1961 - ?: LV-113 / WAL-535

1961-1971: WLV-196


Upper Cedar Point, 1821-1867

Location & historical notes: Maryland, in the section of the Potomac River referred to as "narrows of the Potomac," about 44 miles upriver from the Chesapeake Bay.  Moored on the southerly side of the channel off the mouth of the Tobacco River and about 2 3/4 miles upriver from the present highway bridge for Route 301.

Lightships assigned:

1821- ?: "LL"

? -1859: "EE "

1859-1861: "SS"

1861-1864: station vacant

1864-1867: LV-21


Upper Middle, 1823-1875

Location & historical notes: Delaware, near the middle of the Delaware Bay about 21 miles above the entrance off the south end of Cross Ledge Shoal.

The station was also referred to as "Cross Ledge." 

Lightships assigned:

1823-1845: "X "

1845-1875: LV-19


Vineyard Sound, 1847-1954

Location & historical notes: Massachusetts, the station marked the north side of the western entrance to Vineyard Sound and was located off the Sow and Pigs rocks, 2.3 miles and 219 degrees from the Cuttyhunk Lighthouse.

The station was often referred to as "Sow and Pigs."

Lightships assigned:

1847-1860: "Z"

1861-1875: LV-7

1875-1876: LV-39

1876-1910: LV-41

1910-1915: LV-90 / WAL-514

1915-1924: LV-41

1924-1944: LV-73 / WAL-503

1944-1947: LV-87 / WAL-512

1947-1954: LV-110 / WAL-532


Wades Point Shoal, 1826-1855

Location & historical notes: North Carolina, Southeasterly from Elizabeth City in eastern Albermarle Sound at the west side of the Posquotank River entrance.  Used as a guide for entering the river.  The station was replaced with the Wades Point Lighthouse, which has since been replaced by the Posquotank River Entrance Light, 1.8 miles and 037 degrees from the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1826-1855: "M " (The only lightship to occupy this station)


White Shoal, 1891-1909

Location & historical notes: Michigan, northern end of Lake Michigan in the western approaches to the Straights of Mackinac.  Moored off the northeast side of White Shoal and 4.4 mile and 330 degrees from Waugoshance Light Station's abandoned tower.  The station was replaced by the White Shoal Lighthouse, 0.3 miles and 046 degrees from the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1891-1909: LV-56 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)


Willoughbys Spit, 1820-1872

Location & historical notes: Virginia, in the lower Chesapeake Bay, 2.9 miles and 090 degrees from the Old Point Comfort Lighthouse.  Moored at the east end of Willoughby Bank, an extensive shoal area lying north of Willoughby Spit.  The station marked the south side of the channel for entering Hampton Roads.  The station was no longer considered necessary after the Thimble Shoals Lighthouse was activated 0.9 miles and 022 degrees from the former lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1820 - ?: "C "

1821-1847: "Q "

1867-1868: LV-21

1868-1872: LV-23


Windmill Point , 1834-1869

Location & historical notes: Virginia, on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, off the Rappahannock River entrance.  Moored on the north side of the entrance channel to mark the extensive shoal area extending southeasterly from Windmill Point, and serve as a guide for traffic transiting the river.  The station was replaced by the Windmill Point Lighthouse, which was constructed about 1 mile NNW of the lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1834-1861: "U "

1861-1863: station vacant

1863-1869: ?

? - 1869: Relief LV-21


Winter Quarter Shoal, 1874-1960

Location & historical notes: Virginia, in 66 feet of water about 8 1/2 miles offshore from Assateague Island, 13 miles and 080 degrees from the Assateague Light.  Moved several times to a final position about 9.5 miles east southeast from the shoal.  Guarded Winter Quarter Shoal and served as a reference mark for coastwise traffic, and for making the approach to the Chesapeake Bay from the North.  It was replaced by lighted bell buoy "6 WQS."

Lightships assigned:

1874-1875: LV-24

1875-1876: LV-2

1876-1888: LV-37

1888-1908: LV-45

1908-1934: LV-91 / WAL-515

1934-1942: LV-107 / WAL-529

1942-1945: marked by a buoy during World War II

1945-1960: LV-107 / WAL-529


Wolf Trap, 1821-1893

Location & historical notes: Virginia, on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, about seven miles northeasterly from New Point Comfort.  Moored four miles offshore, about 1.1 miles and 095 degrees from the present Wolf Trap Lighthouse.  Used as a guide for passing clear of Wolf Trap Channel.  The station was no longer needed when the Wolf Trap Lighthouse was activated about 1.1 mile and 2.75 degrees from the lightship station.

Lightships assigned:

1821 - ?: "S "

1855 - ?: "T "

1861-1864: station vacant

1864-1870: LV-22

1870 -1893: station vacant

1893: LV-46


Wreck of Oregon, 1886

Location & historical notes: New York, temporarily marked the wreck of the steamship Oregon off Fire Island.  Located 19.3 miles and 103 degrees from the Fire Island Lighthouse about nine miles offshore south of the town of Mystic Beach.  The station was discontinued later in the same year when the wreck was no longer considered a hazard to navigation.  The lightship was 16 miles and 074 degrees from the position later occupied by the Fire Island lightship.

Lightships assigned:

1886-1886: LV-20 (The only lightship to occupy this station)


Wreck of Scotland (see Scotland)


Wreck of Weehawken, 1865-1872

Location & historical notes: South Carolina, in Charleston Harbor, 0.8 miles and 225 degrees from the Charleston Lighthouse and one mile and 100 degrees from Fort Sumter.  It marked the wreck of the Union monitor USS Weehawken, sunk in combat during a Union assault on Charleston.  The station was eventually replaced by range beacons in Charleston Harbor and a lighted buoy.

Lightships assigned:

1865-1871: LV-31

1871-1872: LV-21


York Spit, 1855-1870

Location & historical notes: Virginia, Chesapeake Bay, west side, off the entrance to the York River.  Moored off the southeast end of the extensive shoal comprising York Spit.

Lightships assigned:

1855-?: ?

? - 1861: "T " (taken by Confederate forces in 1861)

1861-1863: station vacant

1863: LV-22

1864-1867: station vacant

1867-1870: LV-24


Temporary Lightships, end of WW1

With its responsibility for the safe return of troops from Europe after the end of World War I, and in view of the danger from enemy mines existing off the east coast of the U.S., the U.S. Navy conducted minesweeping to provide a safe channel into the principal ports of debarkation.  The centerlines of these one mile wide swept channels were marked by temporary lightship stations maintained by the Navy, offshore from Boston, New York, Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and Charleston and extended from existing approach aids maintained by the U.S. Lighthouse Service to more than 30 miles offshore to facilitate a safe landfall for troop carriers following great circle tracks from French and Mediterranean ports.  The seven temporary Navy lightships were Lapwing Class minesweepers, and were equipped with illumination, fog signal, and submarine bell signal apparatus provided by the Lighthouse Service.  These lightships were place on station commencing in December, 1918 and were withdrawn during the summer of 1919.

Boston Approach 
USS Easthampton ( Navy tug )
January - May 1919

New York Approach
USS Finch
Dec.23 , 1918 - July 19 , 1919

New York Approach # 2 
USS Cardinal
Dec 23, 1918 - July 10 , 1919

Delaware Approach
USS Falcon
Dec 30 , 1918 - May 25 , 1919

Chesapeake Bay Approach
USS Brant
Dec 1918 - May 25 , 1919

Chesapeake Bay Approach # 2
USS Owl
Dec 1918 - July 10 , 1919

Charleston Approach
USS Long Island ( Navy tug )
Dec 1918 - May 25 1919


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