Historic Light Station Information
& Photography

Virginia


ASSATEAGUE LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Assateague Island Light
Location: Southern end of Assateague Island
Date Built: Established in 1833 with present tower built in 1867
Type of Structure: Conical brick tower with red and white stripes;
Height: Tower is 145' with a 154' focal plane
Characteristic: Originally a fixed white light, with a fixed red sector (added in 1907), changed to two white flashes every 5 seconds in 1961, visible for 19 miles.
Lens: Original lens was an Argand lamp system with 11 lamps with 14 inch reflectors. The 1867 tower had a first order Fresnel lens with four wicks, now DCB 236. The Fresnel lens was made by Barbier & Fenestre, Paris 1866
Appropriation: $55,000
Automated: 1933 when changed to battery power

Status: Open Easter through May, and October through Thanksgiving weekend every Friday through Sunday from 9 am to 3 pm; During June, July, August and September open Thursday through Monday from 9 AM to 3PM, last climb 2:30 PM call (757) 336-3696 for information.

Historical Information:

Keepers: David Watson, Tom Moore, Frank Jones, Samuel Quillen, Edgar Hopkins, John Anderton, Walter Wescott, William Collins.

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.  Ms. Myrna Cherrix, the Assateague Lighthouse Historian, also contributed.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

ASSATEAGUE LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


BACK RIVER LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Back River Light (also known as Grandview Light)
Location: 6 miles north of Old Point Comfort, Chesapeake Bay, entrance to Back River; nearest Town/City is Hampton, Virginia
Date Built: 1829
Type of Structure: White-washed conical brick tower
Height: 30 feet
Lens: Ten oil lamps and ten parabolic reflectors
Characteristics: revolving white 1’ 30” interval
Automated: 1915
Foghorn: None noted in records
Appropriation: $4,250.00
Status: No longer standing

Historical Information:

Keepers: William Jett (1829-1852); William Henry Abdell (1863-1885); R.F. Johnson (?-1915)

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

BACK RIVER LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


BELLS ROCK LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Bells Rock Lighthouse
Location: York River, near West Point, Virginia
Date Built: 1881
Type of Structure: screwpile, hexagonal house
Characteristics: fixed white
Lens: fourth order
Foghorn: yes
Height: 40 feet
Appropriation: $35,000
Status: dismantled in 1928

Historical Information:  

  • The first lighthouse was assembled at the Lazaretto Lighthouse Depot in 1880 but was sent to Thimble Shoal when that light burned down.
  • In 1884 the lighthouse was damaged when it was hit by a schooner.
  • The light was dismantled in 1928 when an automated light was placed on the original foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by William Simms, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

BELLS ROCK LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


BOWLERS ROCK LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Bowlers Rock Light
Location: Only lighthouse built on the Rappahannock River between Bowlers Landing and Suggetts Point; nearest town/city is Bowler Landing, Virginia
Date Built: Built in 1868
Type of Structure: Wooden rectangular cottage-style lighthouse on a screw pile; two additional fender piles set one on each of the ebb and flow sides of the structure, for additional stability against the ice.
Status: No longer standing.

Historical Information:

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

BOWLERS ROCK LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


CAPE CHARLES LIGHT

Location:  Smiths Island / Chesapeake Bay entrance
Date Built:  Original tower - 1828, current tower - 1895
Type of Structure:  Octagonal skeletal tower built on concrete piers, central column
Markings / Pattern:  White with black lantern
Height:  180 feet above mean high water
Characteristics:  Flashing white
Foghorn:  Yes 
Appropriation:  $150,000
Range:  24 miles
Status:  Standing and Active

Historical Information:  

  • The original lighthouse on Smith Island, near Cape Charles, Va., at the entrance to Chesapeake Bay was completed in 1828, at a cost of $7,398.82. In 1856 Congress appropriated $35,000 for "rebuilding the Cape Charles Lighthouse upon a proper site and fitting it with proper illuminating apparatus. This sum was spent in 1858 and 1859 and on June 20, 1860, an additional $10,200 was appropriated for a keeper’s dwelling. Only about $1,890 of this was spent, however. Before the new tower was finished it was completely destroyed by "a party of guerrillas" (Confederate) in the Civil War then raging.
  • "In August last (1862)" the Lighthouse Board reported "the lighthouse at Cape Charles was visited by a party of guerrillas, who completely destroyed the light, carrying away such portable articles as they deemed valuable. The new tower authorized for that station had, at the outbreak of the rebellion progressed in construction to a height of 83 feet, the greater part of the materials to complete the tower to its proper height (150 feet) being on the ground, stored, ready for future use. During the rebel occupancy of this part of the peninsula, the articles which had been stored were subjected to indiscriminate pilfering and spoliation, so that a new provision will have to be made."
  • In 1864 Congress appropriated $20,000 for rebuilding the lighthouse and the tower was completed forthwith, the light being first exhibited on May 7, 1864. "Owing to the liability of this important light to an attack from the enemy the Board reported on June 30, 1864, "a competent military guard for its protection has been asked for."  The encroachment of the sea upon the shore at this station had been in progress for many years by 1883 and about 300 feet had been washed away since 1857. By that time (1883) the waterline was within 300 feet of the tower and still nearer the keeper’s dwelling. The average annual encroachment was then about 30 feet. As a result, Congress in 1885 appropriated $10,000 to be used for "jetties of stone resting upon heavy timber mattresses to prevent too rapid sinking into the sand."
  • However, further congressional action was believed necessary in that year to authorize the purchase of additional land needed for the three large jetties and $30,000 was asked for this purpose. By 1886 about 120 feet of brush mattresses of this shore protection were completed and partially loaded with stone and about 80 feet of one jetty was finished extending from the shore to about low water mark. The jetty had already gathered much sand but had washed away somewhat at the sea extremity. In 1889, as steps were being taken to extend the protection, a heavy northeasterly gale washed away about 75 feet of the jetty and undermined the south end of the protection wall, and, at one time, the station was entirely surrounded by water. The retreat of the shore was not local but was general along the island. Any protection works, therefore, would have to extend a long distance to the northeast and be very expensive. It was, therefore, thought to be more economical to build a new light station where it would not be exposed to any danger. This would cost about $150,000.
  • Measures were meanwhile taken to construct four jetties at right angles to the shore protection and a protection wall in front of the one still standing. These were begun in February 1890. An appropriation of $150,000 for a new tower was made on August 30, 1890. The new jetties were finished in April 1891.  The contract for a new iron tower on a new site was signed in June 1893 and the structure was completed December 21, 1894. A first-order lens was installed and the light first exhibited August 15, 1895. The tower is an octagonal, pyramidal skeleton structure, 191 feet above land and 180 feet above water. The 1,200,000 candlepower first-order electric apparatus is unwatched and is visible 20 miles.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

NO PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE


CAPE HENRY LIGHT(s) - OLD & NEW

Location:  Fort Story, Virginia (near Virginia Beach), Chesapeake Bay entrance
Date Built:  Original tower - 1792, current tower - 1881
Type of Structure:  Tower constructed out of cast iron plate on a masonry foundation
Markings / Pattern:  Vertical black and white stripes
Height:  180 feet above mean high water
Characteristics:  Flashing white with red sector
Foghorn:  Yes 
Appropriation:  $150,000
Range:  17 miles
Status:  Standing and Active 

Historical Information:  

  • A provision for building a lighthouse at Cape Henry, at the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, was included in the first appropriation made for lighthouses by Congress on March 26, 1790. The amount was for $24,076.66. The project had already been undertaken by the State of Virginia and Governor Randolph had written President Washington on December 18, 1789:
  • "The State, some years ago, placed upon the shore of Cape Henry nearly a sufficient quantity of materials to complete such a lighthouse as was at that time thought convenient, which have been, in the course of time, covered with sand. Measures are being taken to extricate them from this situation."

  • The Governor offered to sell these materials to the Federal Government and to cede the necessary land for the lighthouse to the United States. The tower which was constructed under contract for $15,200, was an octagonal sandstone tower, the materials for which had undoubtedly been brought from abroad as ballast. The light, which was first shown in 1792, first consisted of oil lamps burning in turn fish oil, sperm oil, colza oil, lard oil, and finally kerosene after the discovery of petroleum in Pennsylvania in 1859.  During most of the early 1800s it was outfitted with 18 Argand style lamps, each with a 12 inch reflector.
  • In 1857 the lighthouse was provided with a dioptric Fresnel lens. Great difficulty, however, was experienced in distinguishing between lights along the coast in the 1840’s because of the numerous fixed white lights, such as Cape Henry’s. It was not until 1922 that the Cape Henry light’s characteristic was changed to a distinctive group flashing light.
  • During the Civil War the lantern of Cape Henry lighthouse was destroyed by Confederate raiders, but it was back in operation by 1863 being protected by a military guard detailed from Fortress Monroe. All the light vessels from Cape Henry southward had either been removed, sunk or destroyed by the Southern forces.
  • In 1872 the Lighthouse Board recommended the building of a new tower, stating that the old tower was in an unsafe condition and that there was no way of repairing it satisfactorily. "It is in danger of being thrown down by some heavy gale." It was not until 1875 that Congress appropriated $75,000 "for rebuilding and remodeling the lighthouse at Cape Henry."
  • In 1879 a contract for a new iron lighthouse, consisting of cast-iron plates backed by masonry walls, was entered into and after two more appropriations of $25,000 each in 1880 and 1881, the new tower was completed and the light first shown on December 15, 1881.  The old tower remained standing and became one of the antiquities of the State of Virginia, serving as a monument commemorating the landing of John Smith.  It is now open to the public.
  • The new structure was 170 feet in height and the lantern was equipped with a first-order lens, the lamp having five concentric wicks. A steam siren fog signal was also established. An incandescent oil-vapor lamp, burning kerosene vapor, replaced the wick lamp in 1912. This increased the intrinsic brilliancy, but decreased the area lit. The candlepower, however, was increased from 6,000 to 22,000. The candlepower has now been increased to 80,000 for the white light, with 16,000-candlepower red sector covering the shoals outside the cape and the middle ground inside the bay. The light is 164 feet above water and visible 19 miles. This station is also equipped with a diaphone fog signal and a radio beacon.  The light was fully automated in 1984.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Cape Henry (Second Tower) Light Station.

  • Lighthouse was officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places, 2 December 2002.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

CAPE HENRY LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


CHERRYSTONE BAR LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Cherrystone Bar Light
Location: South of Cape Charles Harbor; nearest Town/City is Cape Charles, Virginia to mark the channel into the Eastern Shore port.
Date Built: 1858
Type of Structure: Cottage style hexagonal screwpile lighthouse
Characteristics: Fourth order Fresnel Lens, in 1888 a red sector of about 210 degrees of arc was placed in the light with red showing the bay.
Foghorn: Bell
Appropriation: Built for almost $10,000.00
Status: No longer standing

Historical Information:

  • The light was attacked by Confederate forces during the Civil War and was reestablished in 1862 by Union forces.
  • Deactivated in 1919 and replaced with the automatic acerlene lantern on a caisson.
  • The original hexagonal lighthouse was taken off its screwpile, moved by barge (October 1920 – April 1921) becoming the Choptank River Light in Maryland (also known as Benoni Point Light), making it the only lighthouse to ever be moved to another site to be used as a working navigational aid.

Keepers: Gunter one of the few black men in lighthouse service.

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

CHERRYSTONE BAR LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


CHESAPEAKE LIGHT

Location: 14.5 MILES EAST OF CAPE HENRY
Station Established: 1930 (Lightship Station)
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1965
Operational: YES
Automated: YES 1980
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: STEEL PILE
Construction Materials: STEEL/CONCRETE
Height: 120’ above mean high water
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: BLUE TOWER ON WHITE SUPERSTRUCTURE
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: DCB 224

Historical Information:  

  • The station was originally established in 1930 as a lightship station.
  • The "Texas Tower" was built in 1965 and was automated in 1980. 
  • The Chesapeake Light Tower stands 13 miles offshore in the Atlantic Ocean off Virginia Beach.  This steel tower is 120 feet tall.  The tower is supported by four 33 inch concreted filled steel pilings driven 180 feet into the ocean bottom.  Besides its current use as an automated station, the Chesapeake Light Tower is also the site of scientific experimentation by NOAA to collect data on ocean properties and weather. 
  •  It was scheduled to be decommissioned and demolished in 2004.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

CHESAPEAKE LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


CRANEY ISLAND LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Craney Island Light
Location: near entrance to Elizabeth River in Virginia
Date Built: 1859
Type of Structure: square screwpile structure
Height: 34’ above mean high water
Lens: 5th Order
Characteristic: Flashing white every 5 seconds.
Foghorn: Aisler machine
Status: Original structure dismantled, now a light sits on a skeletal structure placed on original foundation.

Historical Information:

  • In 1820 Craney Island was the first permanent lightship site in the nation. She had a fixed white light and her name was printed on the side of her hull.
  • In 1859 the lightship was replaced by a square screwpile lighthouse.
  • In 1861 the light was damaged by Confederate soldiers so by 1863 the light was badly in need of repairs, so the light was replaced with a hexagonal light constructed at the Lazaretto Depot in Baltimore.
  • When the superstructure of this lighthouse was decaying, it was replaced again in 1884 by a hexagonal structure, which lasted into the 1930’s.
  • In 1891 repairs were made to replace gallery posts damaged when the light was hit by a passing vessel.
  • Site is now lighted by a simple light apparatus built on the old screwpile foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by William Simms, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

CRANEY ISLAND LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


DEEPWATER SHOALS LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Deepwater Shoals Light
Location: James River, on the shoal on the starboard side of the channel, above Mulberry Island Point and below Lyon’s Creek, providing improved navigation on the river; nearest town/city is Fort Eustis, Virginia
Date Built: Built in 1855
Type of Structure: Small one story cottage structure, white with red roof on screw pile
Height: Focal plane approximately 27’ above mean high water.
Lens: large pressed-glass masthead lenses suspended in the lantern room of the house replaced in 1868 sixth order Fresnel lens.
Characteristics: Fixed white
Foghorn: Yes
Status: No longer standing

Historical Information:

  • In 1856 the light suffered severe damage from ice floes; an entirely new superstructure had to be built in 1857.
  • On January 20, 1867 the structure was again so severely damaged that the Light House Board rebuilt it. Reconstruction was completed on January 15, 1868 built on wooden pilings.
  • 1862 the lighthouse was lighted after being snuffed out by the rebels; the Light House Board removed the lighting apparatus from the lighthouses and stored them at Ft. Monroe.
  • The lighthouse was decommissioned in 1936 and torn down in 1966.
  • There is an automated steel tower where the lighthouse once stood.

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

DEEPWATER SHOALS LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


DUTCH GAP CANAL LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Dutch Gap Canal Light
Location: Entrances of Dutch Gap Canal near Richmond on the upper James River, Virginia; nearest Town/City is Hopewell, Virginia near the I-295 bridge; this is the last station on the James River
Date Built: 1875
Type of Structure: Two small frame structures 27-foot high lights on posts planked and arranged with a supply room.  The keeper’s house, a plain frame dwelling, was built on a bluff on the Farrar’s Island above the canal.  The house was moved inland in 1890 because of the eroding cliff.  In 1910 the light posts were replaced by fixed lights.
Height: 27 feet each.
Characteristics: Originally to be Sixth order it was decided to use small lantern, burning mineral oil, one at each end of the canal
Appropriation: Congress approved appropriation on March 3, 1873
Status: Inactive

Historical Information:

  • Second tower washed away during high water in December, 1878, indicating that the other tower was earlier destroyed.  Two masts on poles for supporting lanterns were subsequently constructed in 1887.  The lighthouse was deactivated in 1910 the Dutch Gap Canal Lights are now part of an 800-acre conservation area maintained by Henricus Park.

The above was researched and drafted by Catherine (Kitty) Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

NO PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE


GREAT WICOMICO RIVER LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Great Wicomico River Light
Location: western shore of the Chesapeake Bay near Reedville, Virginia.
Date Built: 1889
Type of Structure: screwpile foundation with hexagonal house
Characteristics: 4th Order with fixed white light, two red sectors
Height: 43.5’ above mean high water
Foghorn: yes – Stevens Fog Bell Machine (double blow every 15 sec.)
Construction Material: wood and iron
Deactivated: 1967
Status: house removed in 1967, but original foundation is now used for a more modern beacon, which displays a flashing light.

The above was researched and drafted by William Simms, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

GREAT WICOMICO RIVER LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


HOG ISLAND LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Hog Island Light
Location: SW point of Hog Island Great Machipongo Inlet
Date Built: First tower build 1853
Type of Structure: Conical white brick tower
Operational: No
Date Automated: N/A
Deactivated: March 1948
Height: Focal plane is 72’ above mean high water
Foghorn: none
Construction Material: brick
Original Lens: 1st Order Fresnel
Characteristics: Fixed white light
Status: Demolished – site under water

Historical Information:

  • Light was first established in 1853 on the north side of Great Machipongo Inlet with a First Order Fresnel lens.  However an inspection report dated 1870 indicates the lens was a 4th Order.  The tower was conical brick tower painted white.
  • Erosion caused the need to rebuild the light.  A replacement was completed and lit in 1896.  The new structure was a black steel skeletal tower.
  • Deactivated in 1948 and the lens was put on display in the Newport News Mariners Museum.
  •  In November 2004 the lens was put on display in a glass enclosed pavilion on the Portsmouth waterfront.

The above was researched and drafted by Anne Puppa, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

1854 HOG ISLAND LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.

1896 HOG ISLAND LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.

HOG ISLAND LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.

THE  HOG ISLAND LIGHT TOWER AFTER IT WAS DEMOLISHED; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


JONES POINT LIGHT

Lighthouse Name:  Jones Point Light
Location:  Potomac River, Jones Point Park; nearest Town/City is Alexandria, VA
Date Built:  1856
Type of Structure:  White 1.5 story wood Keeper’s house with black lantern on roof visible for nine miles
Height:  28 feet
Characteristics: Fixed white light changed to fixed red light in 1900.
Lens:1856 fourth order Fresnel lens was converted from whale oil to piped in gas.  In 1900, problems with the gas line caused the fuel supply to be converted to Mineral Oil;, now 155 mm optic
Foghorn:
Appropriation:  $5,000 to acquire land from Manassas Gap Rail Road and build a small lighthouse built by Charles Church.
Status:  Inactive and open to the public

Keepers:  George L. Deeton and J.P. Geisendoffer (1856 -?); Benjamin Greenwood (1866-1903), his second wife remained until 1906 when the station was taken over by Frank Wilkins until shortly after WW1.

Historical Information:

  • 1919 the light was moved closer to the point with a 200 candlepower flashing acetylene light set up about 300 feet to the east of the lighthouse.
  • Deactivated 1926, a new skeletal steel tower was built at the tip of the point with a fixed green light; at the same time the light was declared surplus and turned over to the Mount Vernon Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) for restoration.
  • 1934 the light on the skeletal steel tower was converted to electric power and automated.
  • 1936 the Army Signal Corps owned the land surrounding the light until after WWII when it was returned to the DAR.
  • 1960’s the DAR approached the National Park Service about establishing a park on the 3000 square feet of land around the lighthouse.
  • 1962 the light was discontinued since the new Woodrow Wilson Bridge opened and provided a better source of light for navigation.
  • 1986 an agreement was signed with the Park Service to restore the lighthouse as a museum.
  • Lighthouse was relit by the Mount Vernon Chapter of the D.A.R. in 1995; interior still needs restoration; managed by George Washington Memorial Parkway, 703-289-2500, website: http://www.nps.gov/gwmp 
  • Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The above was researched and drafted by Kitty Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

JONES POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption [photo of the abandoned and dilapidated structure--photo is slightly out of focus]; 9 October 1961; photographer unknown.

JONES POINT LIGHT; File No. 140; Copy Negative No. 051672-18; "Jones Point Light Station: Jones Point Light Station, located on a point in the Upper Potomac River, is a white skeleton tower, with an automatically operated 70 candlepower light situated 60 feet above the water.  The station was first established in 1855, with the light resting on the roof of the keeper's house.  Rebuilt in 1926, the light was moved about 100 feet to the skeleton tower shown here."; 1942?; photographed by "Domer."


JORDAN'S POINT LIGHT (a.k.a. JORDAN POINT)

Name of Lighthouse: Jordan Point Light
Location: James River, on Jordan's Point, port side of river
Date Built: 1855
Operational: No
Date Automated: N/A
Height: focal plane is 35’ above mean high water
Foghorn: Fog bell worked by hand in second structure.
Construction Material: wood with lantern on top of structure
Dwellings: white frame building with red roof
Original Lens: 6th order
Characteristics: fixed white light
Status: Demolished 

Historical Information:

  • Some records refer to this as Jordan's Point Light.  It was established in 1870 and some authorities state Jordan Point Light was established in 1855.  It seems the original light was built on the James River around 1855.
  • Shore erosion resulted in the need to rebuild the tower in either 1870 or 1875.  In this second light the tower was separate from the keeper’s dwelling and this is the structure seen in the pictures on this web site.
  • In 1888 new keeper’s quarters were built.
  • The light was deactivated in 1927 and the station was abandoned a few years later.
  • Skeletal tower was built around 1941 exists where tower once stood. This structure serves as Jordan Point Range Rear Light.

The above was researched and drafted by Anne Puppa, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

JORDANS POINT LIGHT; No photo number; "Jordan's Point Lightstation, James River, Virginia. Front View"; no date listed (1885?); photographer not listed (Major Jared A. Smith ?  See below photo).

JORDANS POINT LIGHT; No photo number; "Jordan's Point Lightstation, James River Virginia, Rear View."; 18 August 1885; Photographed by Major Jared A. Smith.


KILLOCK SHOAL LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Killock Shoal Light
Location: Chincoteague Channel, Virginia
Date Built: 1886
Type of Structure: Rectangular Screw-pile Lighthouse
Height: 47’ 10” above mean high water
Operational: No
Deactivated: 1939
Foghorn: Bell struck by machinery every 15 seconds.
Construction Material: Wooden house
Original Lens: 4th order
Characteristic: Fixed white to W of NNW 1/4 W & S 1/2 E.  Fixed red thru remaining sector.
Status: Destroyed

Historical Information:

  • Light first built in 1886 as a 1- story square frame screw-pile lighthouse.
  • Deactivated and dismantled in 1939 and replaced by an automated light on a steel tower placed on the original lights foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by Anne Puppa, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

KILLOCK SHOAL LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


LAMBERT POINT LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Lambert Point
Location: Elizabeth River - Norfolk
Date Built: 1872
Type of Structure: Square Screwpile
Operational: No
Date Automated: N/A
Deactivated: 1892
Foghorn: Yes
Construction Material: wooden
Tower Shape: square
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: 5th Order Fresnel
Characteristics: Fixed Red
Status: No Longer Standing

Historical Information:

  • The lighthouse was built in 1872 and consisted of a brown dwelling with a red lantern built on top of the structure.  The original lens was a 5th order Fresnel.
  • The lighthouse sat with a 14 inch tilt due to uneven settling on the pilings. More piles were added in an attempt to stabilize the structure. During this construction a dock from the shore to the light and a pier were added.
  • As the Norfolk and Western Railroad expanded the light became less visible because of the additional docks and piers.  As a result the light was decommissioned in 1892.  At this same time a lightship was established to mark nearby Bush Bluff.
  • In 1901 the fog signal was re-started and continued to serve for the next 10 years.
  • In 1911 the lighthouse collapsed due to deterioration.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

LAMBERT POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


NANSEMOND RIVER LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Nansemont River Light
Location: Located near Pig Point on east side of entrance to Nansemont River
Date Built: 1878
Type of Structure: Hexagonal cottage style screwpile lighthouse
Operational: No
Deactivated: 1935
Height: 36’
Foghorn: Yes
Builder: Lazaretto Lighthouse Depot
Construction Material: wooden
Tower Shape: Hexagonal
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Sixth order Fresnel lens
Characteristics: Fixed red
Range: 6 or 7 nautical miles
Status: destroyed

Historical information:

  • The screwpile lighthouse was assembled at the Lazaretto Lighthouse Depot up in Baltimore. Some parts of the light were recycled from the Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse.
  • In 1899 the light was upgraded to a fifth order Fresnel.
  • The screwpile was dismantled in 1935 and a steel skeletal tower with an automated light was affixed to the platform.

The above was researched and drafted by Anne Puppa, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

NANSEMOND RIVER LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


NEW POINT COMFORT LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: New Point Comfort
Location: near northern entrance to Mobjack Bay on Virginia’s western shore
Date Built: 1804
Type of Structure: octagonal sandstone tower with separate frame dwelling
Height: 58 ft.
Characteristics: fixed white light
Lens: Original lens –octagon cylinder with multiple lamps. Fourth order Fresnel
Appropriation: $8,500
Automated: 1930
Range: 13 miles
Status: No longer active

Historical information:

  • New Point Comfort is the third oldest lighthouse built on the Chesapeake Bay. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Elzie Burroughs, who built the lighthouse, as its first keeper.
  • In 1855 a fixed fourth order Fresnel was installed.
  • The Confederates put the lighthouse out of commission during the Civil War to disrupt Union shipping on the Chesapeake Bay.
  • After the war extensive repairs were made and the light was relit in 1865.
  • In 1919 the lighthouse lamps were replaced with an automated acetylene gas fixture
  • Automated in 1930
  • Originally the lighthouse stood on a peninsula but a hurricane in 1933 struck and eroded away much of the land. Over time the land has eroded more and more until it stands on a small island. The keeper’s house no longer stands.
  • In 1950 the light was electrified and the characteristic was changed to a four second flash.
  • The tower was replaced by an offshore beacon with a 2 second red flashing light in 1963 and the tower was abandoned.
  • The lighthouse was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972.
  • In 1975 the light was deeded to Mathews county
  • In 2001 a task force was formed by Mathews County in an effort to preserve the lighthouse.

The above was researched and drafted by Bill Simms, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

NEW POINT COMFORT LIGHT TOWER WITH KEEPER'S DWELLING; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


NEWPORT NEWS MIDDLE GROUND LIGHT

Name of Lighthouse: Newport News Middle Ground
Location: Hampton Roads, VA
Date Built: 1891
Type of Structure: Cast Iron circular structure sitting atop a wooden caisson
Operational: Yes
Date Automated: 1954
Deactivated: No
Height: 35’
Foghorn: Stevens machine striking bell. Original signal double blow ever 15 sec. Changed to single blow every 15 sec in 1954.
Builder:
Appropriation: $50,000.00
Foundation Material: Wooden caisson
Construction Material: Cast Iron
Tower Shape: cylindrical
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fourth Order Fresnel
Characteristics: Fixed white varied by white flash every 20 sec.
Range:
Status: Active

Historical Information:

  • Built in 1891, the Newport News Middle Ground Light is the oldest caisson structure in Virginia waters.  It was built to help mariners navigate while leaving the docks at Newport News.  Because of the presence of ice, and heavy shipping traffic and the depth a caisson structure was recommended.  Authorization was given in May of 1888 and $50,000.00 was appropriated.  The original light had a fixed white characteristic.  About 1,000 tons of rip rap was placed around the light to protect it from erosion due to the currents.
  • In 1954 the light was automated and the characteristic was changed to flashing white and the fog signal was changed from a double to a single blow every 15 seconds.  The light was downgraded to a second-class tall nun buoy.
  • In 1979 the structure was hit by a tugboat that caused some decking to be knocked out and resulted in leaking in the foundation.  Inspection at the time revealed other problems with missing windows, the lantern door being jammed open allowing bird infiltration.  Repairs were made in 1982.
  • In 1986-1987 the light was solarized and was replaced by a less powerful channel marker light that was placed on a pole outside the lantern room.  The light was sandblasted and painted, railings were replaced and new access ladders were installed.
  • Around 1992 the completion of the bay bridge tunnel (Monitor-Merrimack Bridge Tunnel) made the light hard to see.  The lens was upgraded in 2000 and placed back into active duty with a red light rather than a white one.
  • A 1994 inspection team found the light in fair overall condition.  One of the brackets for the lower gallery cantilevered deck was missing, and about 30 percent of the gallery railing was missing.  The lantern door was once again found jammed open allowing birds to infest the interior.
  • The light was on the list of lights to be turned over to non-profit groups in 2005.  No adequate applications were submitted and the light was scheduled to go up for auction in late 2005.

The above was researched and drafted by Anne Puppa, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Newport News Middle Ground Light.

  • Lighthouse was officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places, 2 December 2002.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

NEWPORT NEWS MIDDLE GROUND LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


OLD PLANTATION FLATS LIGHT

Lighthouse Name:  Old Plantation Flats Light
Location:  Entrance to Old Plantation Creek; nearest Town/City is Cape Charles, VA
Date Built:  1886
Type of Structure:  White rectangular cottage style house with tower on roof on a screw pile with an unusual foundation construction with a combination of screw pile and concrete pylons
Height:
Characteristics:
Lens: Fifth order Fresnel lens 
Foghorn:
Appropriation:  $25,000
Status:  No longer standing

Historical Information:

  • Fifth order Fresnel lens destroyed by ice flows in 1893 and replaced a month later with a new fifth order Fresnel lens.
  • Lighthouse was once again damaged by ice flows in 1918 and was later reinforced with concrete at an additional cost of $37,140.
  • Deactivated and dismantled in 1962 and replaced with an automated steel skeleton 39 feet tower with a 4 second flash was built on the original foundation.
  • A replica of this lighthouse with  a reproduction of a fourth order Fresnel lens was built in 2004 by the Bay Creek Resort & Club in Cape Charles; also has installed a 1942 bronze fog bell originally used on a bell buoy.   Website is http://www.baycreekgolfclub.com/plantation_flats.asp 
  • Museum contains U.S. Lighthouse Service artifacts and keepers’ implement on display.

The above was researched and drafted by Kitty Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

OLD PLANTATION FLATS LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


OLD POINT COMFORT LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Old Point Comfort Light
Location:  Entrance to Hampton Roads Harbor, Chesapeake Bay; nearest Town/City is Fort Monroe, VA
Date Built: Built in 1774; present tower built in 1802 built by Elzy Burroughs 
Type of Structure:  White octagonal pyramidal sandstone tower with four large windows providing light to the spiral stone steps that lead to an iron ladder and trap door to the entrance to the lens chamber and a separate Keeper’s house
Height:  58 feet, height of focal point is 54 feet
Characteristics: Two red flasher every 12 seconds
Lens: Eleven oil lantern with eleven fourteen-inch red and green reflector lanterns visible for fourteen miles on a clear day was replaced in 1857 with fourth order Fresnel lens and was automated in 1972
Foghorn:  1855 a fog bell tower was built with a fog bell, 40 inches in diameter and 36 inches in height and audible for 3 miles was added to the station with an appropriation of $6,000
Appropriation:  $1,500 in 1800, a year later another $3,500 was added to the original appropriation
Status:  Still operational

Historical Information:

The above was researched and drafted by Kitty Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

OLD POINT COMFORT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


PAGES ROCK LIGHT

Lighthouse Name:  Pages Rock Lighthouse
Location:  Off Blundering Point, York River; nearest Town/City is about 5 miles north of the town Yorktown, VA
Date Built:  1893
Type of Structure:  Hexagonal Cottage style dwelling on a wooden screw pile with tower on roof.
Height:  41 feet
Characteristics:  
Lens: Fourth order Fresnel lens and was automated in 1960
Foghorn:
Appropriation:
Status:  No longer standing

Historical Information:

  • Lighthouse was assembled at the Lazaretto Depot in Maryland.
  • Lighthouse was deactivated and removed in 1967.  The lighthouse was replaced with an automated steel skeletal tower 43 feet high with a 6 second flashing light built on the original foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by Kitty Price, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

PAGES ROCK LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


POINT OF SHOALS LIGHT

Location: Burwell Bay in the James River, Virginia
Station Established: 1855
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1871
Operational: No
Automated: 1932
Deactivated: 1933
Foundation Materials:
Construction Materials:
Tower Shape: Hexagonal Screw-pile
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: 6th order
Characteristic: Fixed White

Historical Information:

  • The first lighthouse at this sight was built in 1855.
  • It was a hexagonal screw-pile with a pressed glass masthead lens.
  • Confederates raided the lighthouse during the Civil War.
  • In 1871 the lighthouse had to be rebuilt due to severe damage caused by ice flows.
  • It was automated in 1932 and deactivated in 1933.
  • It was torn down in the 1960s.

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

POINT OF SHOALS LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


PUNGOTEAGUE CREEK LIGHT

Status:  No longer standing 

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

PUNGOTEAGUE CREEK LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


RAGGED POINT LIGHT

Location: West side of the Potomac River entrance on the Chesapeake Bay
Station Established: 1910
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1962
Operational? No
Foundation Materials: Iron screwpiles
Construction Materials: Wood and Iron
Tower Shape: Hexagonal screw-pile
Markings/Pattern: Structure white, substructure brown
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fourth Order, Fresnel
Characteristic: Flashing white every 10 seconds

Historical Information:

  • The lighthouse was built at Coles Point near the Virginia shoreline in Westmoreland County on the Potomac River. It is on the opposite side of the river from Piney Point Lighthouse in Maryland.
  • It was deactivated in 1962.  It was one of the first lighthouses to be dismantled.
  • An automated light tower was built on the original foundation.

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

RAGGED POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


SMITH POINT LIGHT

Location: Entrance to the Potomac River near Sunnybank, Virginia
Station Established: 1802
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1897
Operational? Yes
Automated? 1971
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: Cast iron / concrete
Construction Materials: Stone
Tower Shape: Caisson
Markings/Pattern: White with black lantern room & red base
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fourth Order, Fresnel
Characteristic: Fixed white

HISTORICAL INFORMATION:

  • The first light at Smith Point was built in 1802. Shoreline erosion caused the light to be moved in 1807.
  • A lightship was stationed off the point in 1821. I n 1828 erosion caused the light to be moved again. In 1857 a new lightship was placed near the point and in 1859 the light at the point was removed.
  • In 1868 the lightship was replaced by a screw-pile lighthouse.  In 1895 ice destroyed the house when it ripped the house off it piles and carried it down the bay.
  • In July of 1897 the caisson light was complete.  
  • The light was automated in 1971.  
  • This light still stands today and is an active aid to navigation.

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Smith Point Light Station.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

SMITH POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


STINGRAY POINT LIGHT

Location: Entrance to the Rappahannock River, near Deltaville, Virginia
Station Established: 1858
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? No
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1965
Construction Materials: Wood
Tower Shape: Hexagonal Screw-Pile
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Sixth Order
Characteristic: Fixed Red

HISTORICAL INFORMATION:

  • The lighthouse at Stingray Point was built in 1858.
  • It was deactivated in 1965 and dismantled shortly thereafter.
  • Stingray Point was named by Captain John Smith after being stung by a stingray in the area.
  • A replica of the lighthouse was built at the Stingray Harbor Marina in Deltaville, Virginia, 1.6 miles west of the original site.

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

STINGRAY POINT LIGHT; Photo No. AN-4254-12-25; "Stingray Point Lighthouse, VA., Fifth Naval District (Norfolk); photo dated June 28, 1928.

STINGRAY POINT LIGHT; no photo number; "Stingray Point Lighthouse, Mouth of Rappahannock River, Virginia"; 21 August 1885; photographed by Major Jared A. Smith.

STINGRAY POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


TANGIER SOUND

Lighthouse Name: Tangier Sound Light
Location: Entrance to Tangier Sound, VA
Date Built: 1890
Height: 45 ft.
Type of Structure: square screwpile
Lens: Fourth Order Fresnel; Sauter, Lemonnier & Cie. 1889
Characteristic: White flash every 6 sec. with red sector for dangerous shoals.
Fogbell: yes – Number 4 Gamewell. 1 blow, 10 sec. silent, 1 blow, 10 sec. silent.
Appropriation: $25,000
Status: Original Structure no longer standing. Replacement light exists.

Historical Information:

  • In 1905 ice caused a sunken schooner to rise and collide with the lighthouse.
  • In 1914 the keeper made a daring, but futile effort to save the assistant keeper, who fell overboard from his dory.
  • According to inspection records light station was repaired in 1919.
  • Keeper’s house was taken down in 1961 and a steel tower was built on the original foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by Bill Simms, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

TANGIER SOUND LIGHT; no photo number; "Tangier Sound Light Station, VA.; Fifth Naval District (Norfolk) Screw Pile Lighthouse, Camera S.S.E. 25 ft."; 20 August 1915; photographer unknown.

TANGIER SOUND LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown [1961?]; color image.

TANGIER SOUND LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown [same image as the above color photo only in black and white.]


THIMBLE SHOAL LIGHT

Location: Entrance to Hampton Roads, Virginia
Station Established: 1872
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1914
Operational? Yes
Automated? Yes, 1964
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: Cast Iron
Construction Materials: Concrete
Tower Shape: Conical "Spark Plug”
Markings/Pattern: Red tower made from red lead and Venetian red
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fourth Order, Fresnel

Historical Information:

  • A six sided screw-pile light was built at Thimble Shoals in 1872. It replaced the last lightship on the bay.
  • A fire destroyed the lighthouse on October 30, 1880 leaving only the iron work. A replacement light was sent from Lazaretto Depot in Baltimore, MD and the new light was lit on December 24, 1880.
  • This screw-pile seemed doomed from the start. It was rammed by a steamer and damaged in March 1891. A coal barge rammed the lighthouse in 1898 and caused extensive damage. In December of 1909 the lighthouse was rammed so hard by the schooner Malcom Baxter, Jr., it knocked over the coal stove and destroyed the pile foundation. The resulting fire destroyed the lighthouse.
  • A new caisson light was built in 1914. It has fared better than it predecessor. It was automated in 1964 and still serves as an active aid to navigation.

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Thimble Shoal Light Stations.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

THIMBLE SHOAL LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


TUE MARSHES LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Tue Marshes Light
Location: Lower Chesapeake Bay, Goodwind Island Entrance of York River.
Station Established: 1875
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1960
Operational? NO
Automated? N/A
Foghorn: Bell – 1 blow, 30 sec. silent, 2 blows, 30 sec. silent.
Deactivated: 1960
Foundation Materials: Current steel tower uses original foundation
Construction Materials: Wood and Iron
Tower Shape: Square screw-pile
Markings/Pattern: Square screw-pile
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Inspection reports note it as 6th order.
Characteristic: Fixed White, Red Sector
Status: No longer standing

Historical Information:

The above was researched and drafted by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

TUE MARSHES LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


WATTS ISLAND LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Watts Island Lighthouse
Location: Chesapeake Bay, Little Watts Island near Tangier Island
Station Established: 1867
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: N/A
Operational? No
Automated? N/A 
Deactivated: 1944
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials: 
Tower Shape: 48 Foot Tower 
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate 20 by 34 keeper’s quarters
Original Lens: Fifth Order Fresnel 

Historical Information:

  • The tower was built in 1867.  In 1891 a keeper’s quarters was added. 
  • The light was automated in 1923. 
  • A winter storm in 1944 toppled the tower and the island eroded away.  Only a shoal remains where the island and lighthouse once stood. 

The above was researched and drafted by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

WATTS ISLAND LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


WHITE SHOAL (INLET) LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: White Shoal Lighthouse
Location: James River, Sandy Point near Newport News.
Station Established: 1854
Year Original Tower Lit: 1855
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1934
Operational? No
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1934
Foundation Materials: Iron
Construction Materials:
Tower Shape: Hexagonal screw-pile
Markings/Pattern: White Hexagonal screw-pile, red roof and foundation
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fifth Order Fresnel

Historical Information:

  • White Shoal Lighthouse was one of three screw-piles lit on February 6, 1855 on the James River. It replaced a day beacon that had been constructed in 1854.
  • By 1869 the poorly constructed structure was leaning to one side and deemed unsafe.
  • In 1871 the structure was completely rebuilt and a fog bell and fifth order lens were added.
  • The lighthouse was deactivated in 1934. An automated light was built near the original location.
  • In the 1970’s ice flows carried the structure away. Though it was deemed unsafe 100 years before, it out lasted all other lighthouses on the James River.

The above was researched and drafted by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

WHITE SHOAL LIGHT; no photo number; "White Shoal Lighthouse; James River, Virginia"; 12 August 1885; photographed by Major Jared A. Smith.


WINDMILL POINT LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Windmill Point Lighthouse
Location: Chesapeake Bay, North Side of entranced to Rappahannock River.
Station Established: 1834
Year Original Light First Lit: 1869
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1965
Operational? No
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1965
Foundation Materials: Current beacon uses original foundation
Construction Materials:
Tower Shape: Hexagonal screw-pile
Markings/Pattern: White Hexagonal screw-pile
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fifth Order Fresnel

Historical Information:

  • Between 1834 and 1869 three separate Lightships were stationed where the light was built. In 1861 Confederates took the Lightship.
  • In 1869 a permanent lighthouse was built. The structure was a white Hexagonal screwpile with a fifth order lens.
  • Harsh Chesapeake Bay winters took their toll on the lighthouse. Riprap stones were added to shore up the lighthouse.
  • The light was automated in 1954.
  • The structure was dismantled in 1965. A small automotive beacon was built on the original foundation.

The above was researched and drafted by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

WINDMILL POINT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


WOLF TRAP LIGHT

Lighthouse Name: Wolf Trap Light
Location: Lower Chesapeake Bay, South of Rappahannock River.
Station Established: 1821
Year Original Tower Lit: 1870
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1894
Operational? Yes
Automated? Yes 1971
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: Caisson
Construction Materials: Brick
Tower Shape: Square on octagonal building
Markings/Pattern: Red on brown cylinder w/black lantern
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: Fourth Order

Historical Information:

The above was researched and drafted by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Wolf Trap Light Station.

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

WOLF TRAP LIGHT; black & white 75 dpi photo; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.

WOLF TRAP LIGHT; 300 dpi color photo; same as above.


YORK SPIT LIGHT

Status:  No longer standing 

Photographs  (click on light name below to access image): 

YORK SPIT LIGHT; no photo number/caption; date/photographer unknown.


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