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Historic Light Station Information
& Photography

MAINE


Note: Much of the following historical information and lists of keepers was provided through the courtesy of Jeremy D'Entremont and his website on New England lighthouses.  Click here to visit his website.

AVERY ROCK LIGHT

Location: ON SOUTHERLY END OF AVERY ROCK, IN MACHIAS BAY, MAINE
Station Established: 1875
First Lit: Oct. 1875
Operational: No
Automated: 1926
Deactivated: Destroyed by a storm in 1946
Foundation Material: 
Construction Material: Brick and wood
Tower Shape: White square tower
Markings: White square tower rising from a square dwelling
Relationship to Other Structures: Attached
Original Lens: 
Tower Height: 34 feet
Range: 13 miles
Original Optic: Fourth Order Fresnel lens 
Present Optic: A buoy in the water 100 from the site of the lighthouse.
Characteristics: White flash every 6 seconds-In 1931 it was a fixed red.
First Keeper: Warren A. Murch
Current Use: Gone- Destroyed by a storm
Fog Signal: Fog Bell (1931) 1 stroke every 10 seconds

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Linda Herman, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

AVERY ROCK LIGHTHOUSE


BAKER ISLAND LIGHT

Location: MT. DESERT ISLAND/SOMES SOUND APPROACH
Station Established: 1828 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1855 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1966 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1855 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

BAKER ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


BASS HARBOR HEAD LIGHT

Location: MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, ENTRANCE TO BASS HEAD HARBOR, ENTRANCE TO BLUE HILL HARBOR, NEAR BASS HARBOR, MAINE
Station Established: 1858
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? YES
Automated? 1974
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

BASS HARBOR HEAD LIGHTHOUSE


BEAR ISLAND LIGHT

Location: BEAR ISLAND/NORTHEAST HARBOR
Station Established: 1839
First Lit: Oct. 1889
Operational: Yes 
Automated: 
Deactivated: 1981-1989
Foundation Material: Granite Rubble
Construction Material: Brick
Tower Shape: Cylindrical attached to a work room
Markings: White with Black Lantern
Relationship to Other Structures: Separate
Original Lens: Fifth Order Frensel Lens 
Tower Height: 31 feet
Range: –
Original Optic: Fifth Order Fresnel lens 
Present Optic: 
Characteristics: White Flash every 5 seconds.
First Keeper: John G. Bowan
Current Use: Private Aid to Navigation
Fog Signal: Bell
National Register Status

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Linda Herman, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

BEAR ISLAND LIGHT, CIRCA LATE-NINETEENTH CENTURY

OVERHEAD VIEW OF THE BEAR ISLAND LIGHT STATION, CIRCA 1972

BEAR ISLAND LIGHT STATION, SAME AS ABOVE BUT CLOSER, CIRCA 1972


BLUE HILL BAY LIGHTS

Location: ON GREEN ISLAND/BLUE HILL BAY 
Station Established: 1857 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857 
Operational? NO 
Automated? YES 1935 
Deactivated: 
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE?? 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Markings/Pattern: CYLINDRICAL 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1857

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


BOON ISLAND LIGHT

Location: BOON ISLAND, NINE MILES OFF THE COAST OF YORK BEACH, YORK, MAINE
Station Established: 1811
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1855
Operational? YES
Automated? 1980
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK
Construction Materials: GRANITE
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

BOON ISLAND LIGHT


BROWNS HEAD LIGHT

NW END OF VINALHAVEN ISLAND
Station Established: 1832
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1987
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1857

Photographs:

BROWNS HEAD LIGHT


BURNT COAT HARBOR LIGHT

HOCKAMOCK HEAD/SWANS ISLAND
Station Established: 1872
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1872
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1975
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: MASONRY
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Photographs:

BURNT COAT HARBOR LIGHT SHOWING FRONT RANGE TOWER

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE BURNT COAT HARBOR LIGHT STATION


BURNT ISLAND LIGHT

BOOTHBAY HARBOR ENTRANCE
Station Established: 1821
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1821
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1989
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: RUBBLE STONE
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: LEWIS PATENT REFLECTORS

Photographs:

BURNT ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


CAPE ELIZABETH LIGHTS

CASCO BAY ENTRANCE
Station Established: 1828
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1874
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1963
Deactivated: WEST TOWER WAS DEACTIVATED IN 1924.
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: CAST IRON
Tower Shape: CONICAL ATTACHED TO ENTRANCE ROOM; East Tower: CONICAL W/OUT LANTERN
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK TRIM; East Tower: WHITE
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER, FRESNEL 1874

General Information:

Two rubblestone towers were first erected on Cape Elizabeth in 1828 at a cost of $4,250. President John Quincy Adams appointed Elisha Jordan as the first keeper in October 1828 at a salary of $450 per year. In 1855 Fresnel lenses were installed and in 1869 a giant steam whistle was set up for use in foggy weather. In 1873 the rubble towers were taken down and two cast-iron edifices erected, 300 yards apart. One was a fixed and one a flashing light. A fog siren replaced the locomotive whistle.

One of the most thrilling episodes in the history of the lighthouse occurred on January 28, 1885, when Keeper Marcus A. Hanna saved two crew members of the schooner Australia which had grounded on the ledge near the fog signal station. The two men had taken to the rigging and were coated with ice, unable to move. The captain was drowned as a huge comber washed the deck. Keeper Hanna, securing a heavy iron weight to the end of a stout line, attempted time and again to reach the men with it. Suddenly a towering wave struck the schooner and smashed her against the rocks, putting her on her beam ends.

Keeper Hanna again threw his line and watched it land on the schooner. One of the seamen managed to reach it and bent it around his waist. Then he jumped into the sea and the keeper, with great effort, pulled him up over the rocky ledge. The keeper now heaved the line a second time and finally it reached the second seaman who wound it around his icy body. Then he too jumped into the ocean. Just as the keeper’s strength was exhausted in trying to haul ashore the second man, help came in the shape of the keeper’s assistant and two neighbors, who helped haul the man to safety.

In the 1920’s the west tower of Cape Elizabeth Light was dismantled.

The light, at the south entrance to Portland Harbor, is equipped with a 1,800,000 candlepower light visible for 17 miles. The white conical tower is 67 feet above ground and 129 feet above water.

Photographs:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


CAPE NEDDICK "THE NUBBLE" LIGHT

OFF CAPE NEDDICK/YORK HARBOR
Station Established: 1879
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1879
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1987
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE
Construction Materials: CAST IRON PLATE W/BRICK LINING
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1879

Photographs:

CAPE NEDDICK LIGHTHOUSE WITH BELL TOWER

CAPE NEDDICK LIGHTHOUSE WITHOUT BELL TOWER


CRABTREE LEDGE LIGHT

Location: ON CRABREE LEDGE, NORTHERLY PART OF FRENCHMAN BAY, AND ABOUT 1/4 MILE OFF THE EASTERLY SHORE OF CRABTREE NECK, MAINE
Station Established: 1890
Year Current / Last Tower(s) First Lit: 1890
Operational: No
Automated: No
Deactivated: 1933
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Black cylindrical foundation pier, surmounted by a brown conical tower.  A gallery, with roof, surrounds base of tower.
Height: 37-feet
Original lens: Fifth Order
Characteristic: Fixed white varied by a white flash every 2 minutes
Fog Signal: Bell struck by machinery every 10 seconds

Photographs:

CRABTREE LEDGE LIGHTHOUSE


CUCKOLDS (THE) LIGHT

CAPE NEWAGEN/BOOTH BAY APPROACH
Station Established: 1892
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1907
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1975
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK
Construction Materials: WOOD
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE (PARTIALLY DESTROYED) W/RED TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Boothbay Harbor was a busy fishing port in the 19th and early 20th century.  The barren rock upon which the Cuckold station is located was first marked by a wooden tripod daymark.  Because the daymark was of little use at nighttime or in foggy weather, a fog signal station was established in 1892.  A light tower was added to the station in 1907 due to increased fishing vessel traffic in the bay.  The station was automated in 1975.

The Lighthouse Board Report for 1890 described the need for a fog-signal station at Cuckolds as follows:

"The Cuckolds consist of two rocky islets rising about 15 feet above high water in the westerly edge of the channel at the entrance to Booth Bay. The Atlantic Coast Pilot says of them:  They are dangerous of approach on their southern side on account of the reefs in that direction, and the shoals also extend half a mile to the westward of the western rock, ... but the eastward side of the eastern rock is quite bold-to. The flood current sets right on these rocks.  They are much dreaded by mariners in thick weather and are a great peril to a large number of vessels, as it is estimated that from three to four thousand enter the bay for refuge in Booth Bay Harbor, which is well protected and is one of the most useful and important harbors of refuge on the coast of Maine. It is therefore recommended that a fog-signal be placed on the Cuckolds of sufficient range to warn vessels of their approach. Numerous petitions have been received asking for the establishment of this fog-signal, and the Board, after careful investigation, has found that a fog-signal of sufficient range upon the easterly island of the Cuckolds will give vessels adequate warning of their approach and would be of great benefit to navigators. It is estimated that a keeper's dwelling, fog-signal house, cistern, bulkhead, machinery, etc., will cost $25,000, and an appropriation of this amount is recommended therefor. This was authorized by the act of August 30, 1890, but no appropriation was made for doing the work."

Meanwhile, the State of Maine deeded the Cuckolds to the United States on June 30, 1890 for use as a fog signal station.

Cuckolds Fog Signal Station, 1892

Congress appropriated $25,000 for a fog signal at or near Cuckolds Island, Boothbay or Townsend Harbor, Maine, on March 3, 1891.  The fog signal at the station consisted of a compressed hot air, first-order Daboll trumpet in duplicate.  In 1893, it was reported the fog signal machinery was overhauled and repaired.  A 1,000-pound bell was installed as a back up while getting up the air pressure on the Daboll trumpet.  In 1897, it was reported that two fences were built to protect the station against the wind.  It was reported in 1898 that the direction of the fog signal was changed so that it could be heard in a more useful direction.  In 1901, it was reported that the fog signal machinery was overhauled and repaired.  The concrete apron along the underpinning of all the buildings was repainted and the concrete floor of the balcony was renewed.  In 1902, it was reported that the old hot air fog signal apparatus was replaced by a modern oil-operated engine made in the machine shop in Boston.  In 1904, it was reported that the fog-signal plant was overhauled.  Reports show, in 1907, a brick water cistern was built for the fog signal.

In 1904, the first-order Daboll trumpet at the Cuckolds fog signal plant was described as consisting of 4-horsepower oil engines, air compressors, and air tanks all in duplicate.  It carried 4 pounds of pressure, and 1.2 cubic feet of free air were used during a second of blast.  The fog signal station operated some 1,220 hours and consumed about 573 gallons of oil in 1904; operated some 1,112 hours and consumed about 549 gallons of oil in 1905; operated some 1,040 hours and consumed about 507 gallons of oil in 1906; and operated some 1,236 hours and consumed about 507 gallons of oil in 1907.  In comparison, the hot air fog signal equipment in 1901 ran some 1,003 hours and consumed about 6 tons of coal. In 1902, the equipment ran some 797 hours using about five tons of coal before being changed over to oil, which operated some 423 hours and used about 195 gallons of oil.

In 1933, the fog signal consisted of a first class reed horn with a 3-second blast followed by 17 seconds of silence.  A bell was used if the horn was disabled. By 1971, the fog signal was changed to a diaphragm air horn with a blast of 2.5 seconds and a silent period of 17.5 seconds.

Cuckolds Light Station, 1907

There was limited room on the island so a wooden light tower was built upon the brick fog signal building.  The light station was described in 1930 as consisting of 7 acres, more or less of rocks, with the following improvements: a dwelling and fog signal house surmounted by a tower, boathouse and slip, bulkhead.  The land was valued at nothing and the improvements at $32,000.  The light was identified as giving a double white flash every six seconds.  The light was described in 1933 as having a characteristic of a white flash for 0.3 seconds followed by an eclipse of 1.7 seconds followed by a white flash of 0.3 seconds followed by an eclipse of 3.7 seconds.  The candlepower was 24,000 provided by an incandescent oil vapor lamp and fourth-order lens. The light was visible up to 13 miles.

By 1946 and through at least 1951, the light had the same light characteristic, but the candlepower was increased to 30,000 fueled by an electric lamp and fourth-order lens.   By 1971, the intensity of the light was increased to 500,000 candlepower indicated by station's resident personnel.   By 1987, the light characteristic had changed to a one second white flash followed by a one second eclipse followed by a one second white flash followed by a three second eclipse.  The Coast Guard constructed a helicopter pad for the station in 1969.

In September 1925, keeper Fred T. Robinson saved several persons from a disabled vessel, which was rapidly drifting out to sea.  During the great storm of January 27 and 28, 1933, the bulkhead protecting the station was torn away and much of the contents of the assistant keeper's dwelling were destroyed.  The assistant keeper was reimbursed by the Department of Commerce for his losses including his radio and Hawaiian guitar.  At some point, a radio beacon was established at Cuckolds to aid the mariner in electronic navigation. The keeper's dwelling was destroyed during a blizzard in 1978.  George A. Lewis was assigned to the station when it became a light station. Captain Elliott replaced Lewis until his transfer to Cape Elizabeth Light Station.  On March 8, 1934, Justin A. Foss became keeper. H. E. Seavey was his assistant.

Click here to access the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Cuckolds Light Station.

Photographs:

CUCKOLDS LIGHT TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION

CUCKOLDS LIGHT TOWER, CIRCA 1975


CURTIS ISLAND LIGHT

CAMDEN HARBOR ENTRANCE/PENOBSCOT BAY
Station Established: 1835
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1896
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1972
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Photographs:

1835 CURTIS ISLAND LIGHT TOWER

1896 CURTIS ISLAND LIGHT TOWER, CLOSE-UP VIEW

CURTIS ISLAND LIGHT STATION


DEER ISLAND THOROFARE LIGHT

MARK ISLAND/DEER ISLAND THOROFARE
Station Established: 1857
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1958
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: MASONRY
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK & RED TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER

Photographs:

DEER ISLAND THOROFARE LIGHTHOUSE


DICE HEAD LIGHT

PENOBSCOT RIVER MOUTH
Station Established: 1829
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1829
Operational? NO
Automated? NO
Deactivated: 1937
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: GRANITE RUBBLESTONE/BRICK LIN.
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: LEWIS PATENT APPARATUS 1828

Historical Information:

On the tip end of the peninsula that forms the mouth of the Penobscot River stands the now unwatched Dice Head Lighthouse. Built in 1829 and remodeled in 1858, the lighthouse is now just one more monument to the historic "Pentagoet" region. Here the first white settlers of 1614, French traders under La Tour, gave way to the British from the Plymouth colony led by Isaac Allerton in 1629. The French retook Castine in 1635 only to be again driven out by the British in 1654. Sixteen years later Hubert d’Andigny once more occupied this strategic key town to the Penobscot River for the French. In 1674, a Flemish corsair captured the garrison. Two years later the wealthy and adventurous Baron de St. Castine took over the town, which still bears his name. Married to the daughter of the Indian Chief, Madoca-wando, he became a powerful influence among the Indians and the town became a thriving shipping port.

Six years after the original light was built in 1829 Capt. Henry D. Hunter of the United States revenue cutter Jackson inspected it. "This light," he reported, "should be located on the northern head of Holbrook Island, at the eastern entrance to Castine Harbor. It would then answer as a guide up the Penobscot River and a harbor light." The lighthouse was rebuilt in 1937 and is now a white skeleton tower on the north side of the entrance to Castine Harbor, 27 feet above water. Its 8,000 candlepower acetelyne light flashes white every 4 seconds and is visible for 10 miles.

Photographs:

DICE HEAD LIGHTHOUSE, EARLY VIEW

DICE HEAD LIGHTHOUSE, CIRCA 1937


DOUBLING POINT (KENNEBEC RIVER) RANGE LIGHTS

ARROWSIC ISLAND/KENNEBEC RIVER
Station Established: 1898
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1898
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1980
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: GRANITE
Construction Materials: WOOD
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/RED TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER REFLECTOR

Photographs:

DOUBLING POINT RANGE LIGHTS


DOUBLING POINT LIGHT

ARROWSIC ISLAND/KENNEBEC RIVER
Station Established: 1898
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1899
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1988
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCK CAISSON
Construction Materials: WOOD
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER AT END OF FOOTBRIDGE
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1902

Photographs:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


EAGLE ISLAND LIGHT

EAST PENOBSCOT BAY
Station Established: 1838
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1963
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: GRANITE RUBBLESTONE
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1858

Photographs:

EAGLE ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


EGG ROCK LIGHT

ENTRANCE TO FRENCHMANS BAY NEAR WINTER HARBOR
Station Established: 1875
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1875
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1976
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE W/REPLICA ALUMINUM LANTERN
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER ON RED ROOF
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Photographs:

EGG ROCK LIGHT TOWER WITH LANTERN ROOM

EGG ROCK LIGHT TOWER WITHOUT LANTERN ROOM


FORT POINT LIGHT

ENTRANCE TO PENOBSCOT RIVER
Station Established: 1837
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1988
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: GRANITE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: CREAM W/BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1837

Photographs:

FORT POINT LIGHTHOUSE


FRANKLIN ISLAND LIGHT

MUSCONGUS BAY
Station Established: 1805
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1855
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1967
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/GREY & RED TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER

Photographs:

FRANKLIN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


GOAT ISLAND LIGHT

Location: Goat Island, Cape Porpoise Harbor
Station Established: 1835
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1859
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes, 1990
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: Natural, emplaced
Construction Materials: Brick
Tower Shape: Cylindrical
Markings/Pattern: White with black lantern
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate
Original Lens: Fifth Order

Photographs: 

Goat Island Light -- early image of the 1835 tower: (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); no caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

Goad Island Light -- view from the sea, late 19th century: (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); Original caption: "Goat Island Light Station, Me. [;] N., 1/8th m."; no date/photo number; photographer unknown. 

Goat Island Light -- same period as previous photo: (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); no caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

Goat Island Light -- aerial view of the 1859 tower: (75 dpi); no caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.


GOOSE ROCKS LIGHT

EAST ENTRANCE FOX ISLANDS THOROFARE
Station Established: 1890
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1890
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1963
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: CAST IRON/CONCRETE CAISSON
Construction Materials: CAST IRON
Tower Shape: SPARKPLUG
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER, BLACK BASE & TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER

Photographs:

GOOSE ROCKS LIGHTHOUSE


GREAT DUCK ISLAND LIGHT

BLUE HILL BAY APPROACH
Station Established: 1890
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1890
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1986
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: TIMBER/STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK/GRANITE
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Photographs:

GREAT DUCK ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


GRINDLE POINT LIGHT

GILKEY HARBOR
Station Established: 1850
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1874
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1934
Deactivated: 1934-1987
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Photographs:

GRINDLE POINT LIGHTHOUSE


HALFWAY ROCK LIGHT

CASCO BAY OFF BAILEY ISLAND
Station Established: 1871
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1871
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1975
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: GRANITE
Construction Materials: GRANITE
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER, FRESNEL 1871

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

HALFWAY ROCK LIGHTHOUSE


HENDRICKS HEAD LIGHT

SHEEPSCOT RIVER ENTRANCE
Station Established: 1829
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1875
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1975
Deactivated: 1935-1951
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: SQUARE
Markings/Pattern: PLAIN WHITEWASH W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1875

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society

Photographs:

HENDRICKS HEAD LIGHTHOUSE


HERON NECK LIGHT

HERON NECK LIGHT, MAINE
GREEN’S ISLAND SOUTHWEST OF VINALHAVEN, MAINE
Station Established: 1854
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1854
Operational? YES
Automated? 1982
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH RED AND BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

1854 Heron Neck Light Tower: (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi);  No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.  Mid-19th century photograph.

Heron Neck Light: (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); No caption; photo dated 1953; no photo number; photographer unknown.  Aerial view of station.


INDIAN ISLAND LIGHT

INDIAN ISLAND/ROCKPORT HARBOR 
Station Established: 1850 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1875 
Operational? NO 
Automated? NO 
Deactivated: 1934 
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: SQUARE 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK TRIM 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1856 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

INDIAN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


ISLE AU HAUT (ROBINSON POINT) LIGHT

ROBINSON POINT ON ISLE AU HAUT, MAINE
Station Established: 1907
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1907
Operational? YES
Automated? 1934
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Construction Materials: GRANITE/BRICK
Tower Shape: LOWER CONICAL/UPPER CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: LOWER GREY/UPPER WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

ISLE AU HAUT LIGHT


LIBBY ISLAND LIGHT


MACHIAS BAY ENTRANCE 
Station Established: 1822 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1848 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1974 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Tower Shape: CONICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1855

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

LIBBY ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


LITTLE RIVER LIGHT

LITTLE RIVER ISLAND, CUTLER HARBOR, MAINE
Station Established: 1846
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1876
Operational? YES
Automated? 1974
Deactivated: 1975-2001
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Construction Materials: CAST IRON/BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPERATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

1847 LITTLE RIVER LIGHT TOWER

1876 LITTLE RIVER LIGHT TOWER WITH THE ORIGINAL KEEPER'S QUARTERS

1876 LITTLE RIVER LIGHT TOWER WITH THE NEWER KEEPER'S QUARTERS


LUBEC CHANNEL LIGHT

LUBEC CHANNEL LIGHT 
LUBEC CHANNEL 
Station Established: 1890 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1890 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1968 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE/CAST IRON CAISSON 
Construction Materials: CAST IRON W/BRICK LINING 
Tower Shape: CONICAL "SPARK PLUG" 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER ON BLACK CYLINDRICAL PIER 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1890

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

LUBEC CHANNEL LIGHTHOUSE


MANANA ISLAND FOG SIGNAL STATION

NEAR MONHEGAN ISLAND, 10 MILES SOUTH OF PORT CLYDE, MAINE
Station Established: 1855
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: N/A
Operational? YES
Automated? 1988
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: UNKNOWN
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: BELL TOWER
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPERATE
Original Lens: N/A

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Additional Historical Information:

The Lighthouse Board report for 1853 stated:

"I think it of great importance that there should be a bell at Monhegan. The light-house is so far from the point where the bell should be situated, that the light-keeper could not attend to it, and it will be advisable, therefore, to have a house built on which the bell might be placed; and a man should be appointed whose sole duty should be to take charge of the bell. The proper site for the bell is on a small island which lies off Monhegan, called Manana. For the house and bell, and for purchasing the land, the sum of $3,500 will be necessary."

An act of Congress, approved August 3, 1854, appropriated $3,500 for the establishment of a fog signal and keeper's dwelling for Manana Island, Maine.  A 1/4 acre of land with right of way to the water was purchased from the Monhegan Plantations heirs for $53.98.  In 1855, a 2,500 pound fog signal bell, cast in Boston in 1832, was mounted on a 24 foot-tall wooden frame attached to the keeper's dwelling.  The fog bell was 55 feet above sea level and approximately one mile due west of the lighthouse on Monhegan Island.  The fog signal was struck by hand until a J.D. Custer striking machine was installed in 1856.

An act of Congress approved July 28, 1866, appropriated funds for new & efficient fog signals including Manana Island.  As a result, in 1870, the fog bell was replaced with a six-inch Ericsson engine and ten-inch Daboll trumpet, giving a 15-second blast every 55 seconds. In 1872, the Daboll trumpet was removed to Portland Head, Maine, and a six-inch steam fog whistle was installed, giving two 5-second blast every 60 seconds.21

In 1876, the Manana Island fog signal was made into a separate station from the Monhegan Light Station.  The fog signal site was considered too low and the sound masked in some directions by neighboring hills.  Because of difficulty in obtaining title to a better site, the height of the signal was raised and the six-inch fog whistle replaced with a eight-inch whistle.  The keeper's dwelling was raised 18-inches (apparently unrelated to the fog signal heightening) and exterior siding covered with clapboard, and a new sill and under floors were installed.  A frame engine house for a duplicate fog-signal apparatus was built adjoining the keeper's dwelling, and a 50-foot-long boat way was built.  In 1877, a first-class Daboll trumpet, operated by duplicate 32-inch caloric engines, was installed in the new engine house.  The new fog signal characteristic was a 15-second blast every 40 seconds.

In 1887, it was reported the engine house was lathed and plastered, but in 1889, the frame engine house was demolished and a brick fog-signal house built on the same site.  A new brick water cistern was also built for the dwelling.  Brick underpinnings were also installed under the frame dwelling. In 1896, the old summer kitchen was enlarged and made into an assistant keeper's quarters.  The signal house was turned into a fuel house, and a small engine-operated wire cable for carrying coal was erected between the top of the hill of the island and the boathouse.

In 1899, a four horsepower Hornsby-Akroyd oil engine and a Clayton air compressor in duplicate replaced the caloric engines.  The interior of the keeper's house was rearranged and a two room ell attached.  In 1900, a cooling tank was built, the cistern repaired, and a ceiling put into the fog signal house.  The fog signal characteristic was changed to blasts of 10-seconds every 30 seconds.  In 1901, the engine, formerly used to operate a fog bell, was installed for purposes of hauling supplies by tram from the boathouse to the station site.  In 1905, the tram was moved to the government right of way, the boat way and boathouse rebuilt on the right of way, and an engine house with hoisting engine installed. In 1906, an oil house and close board fence were built.

In 1912, a first-class air siren, giving a group of three blasts of 3-seconds duration every 25 seconds followed by a silent interval of 35 seconds, replaced the first-class Daboll trumpet.  The air siren signal was described in 1933 as a group of three blasts every 60 seconds: 3 blasts of 3-seconds each, followed by a period of silence of 35 seconds.  The fog signal building was described as a brown, brick house.  In 1946 and 1951, the station was described as consisting of an air diaphragm horn with radio beacon distance-finding station.  In 1987, the station signal was described as 2 blasts every 20 seconds.  The radio beacon and brick brown house were still reported as extant in 1987.  The radio beacon tower was removed in 1995; the fog signal bell and boathouse were removed in the early 1990s.

The fog signal station was described in 1930 as consisting of a brick fog signal house, two dwellings, an oil house, a boat house and slip, a tramway from boat house to dwelling, and a donkey boiler house, and fuel house. The land was appraised at $75 and the improvements at $21,575.23

Fog Signal

The first fog signal used at the station was a fog bell that operated from 1855 until replaced with a steam operated first-class Daboll trumpet in 1870. The fog bell was retained as an emergency backup.  In 1872 until 1876, the trumpet was replaced with a steam operated fog whistle.  The whistle was not powerful enough for the site and was replaced in 1877 by a new first-class Daboll trumpet.  The signal operated for 1,049 hours in 1884, operated for 1,211 hours in 1885, operated for 1,438 hours in 1886, operated for 1,577 hours consuming 31,460 pounds of coal in 1888, operated for 1,805 hours consuming approximately 16 ton of coal in 1890, operated for 1,122 hours consuming approximately 132 tons of coal in 1892, operated for 1,038 hours consuming approximately 13 tons of coal in 1893, and operated for 1,181 hours consuming approximately 16 tons of coal in 1894.  The station used coal until 1902 when oil engines were installed still using a first-class Daboll trumpet.  In 1912, the first-class Daboll trumpet was replaced with a first-class air siren.  The present fog signal is a diaphone horn.

In 1910, $2,000 was authorized for a light and fog signal or whistling buoy with submarine signal to aid this station.  On March 4, 1911, appropriations for $10,000 were made to improve the light at Monhegan Island and fog signal at Manana Island.

Keepers

In about 1877, a telegraph wire connecting Monhegan and Manana Island allowed the keeper at Monhegan to activate an electric gong situated in the bedroom wall of the fog signal station on Manana alerting that keeper that a fog bank was rolling in.

Keepers at Monhegan Island Light Station assigned to Manana:

Sylvester Davis October 15, 1855-February 27, 1857
Thomas Kinney February 27, 18857-March 29, 1857
Henry T. Studley March 29, 1861-November 19, 1870
Francis A. Brackett May 29, 1871-December, 1872
Bradbury Emerson, 1st Asst. December 13, 1872-October 30, 1873
Andrew J. Marston, 1st Asst. December 26, 1873-February 28, 1876
Frank E. Adams, 1st Asst. March 16, 1876-April 11, 1876

Keepers assigned to Manana Fog Signal Station:

Frank E. Adams April 11, 1876-March 24, 1878
John W. Williams March 25, 1878-January, 1883
Charles S. Williams January, 1883-June, 1890
Daniel Stevens June, 1890-September, 1902
Frank C. Pierce, Asst. February, 1895-September, 1902
Frank C. Pierce September, 1902-November 2, 1916
Edward S. Farren, Asst. September, 1902-March 1913
Eugene W. Osgood, Asst. March 1913-
Charles G. Dyer November 3, 1916-
The last civilian keeper was Henley C. Day who retired in 1956. Coast Guard personnel manned the station until automated in about 1986.

Click here to access the Manana Island Fog Signal Station's National Register of Historic Places nomination.

Photographs:

MANANA ISLAND FOG SIGNAL STATION

Manana Island Fog Signal Station, 1977.  Submitted by Coast Guardsman Marion P. Danna, who noted: "I was on Manana Island Fog Signal Station from 1977-1979 and I took a picture of the keepers house from the front view showing the tramway to house. It shows the generator fuel tanks, and attached buildings also, its a pretty good picture.I just thought it would give people that like history another look at Manana when it was a full fledged manned station by US Coast Guard people back then. It was great duty [;] I sure hated when they automated all those places." 


MARSHALL POINT LIGHT

MARSHALL POINT LIGHT, MAINE
ENTRANCE TO PORT CLYDE HARBOR, PENOBSCOT BAY, MAINE
Station Established: 1832
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857
Operational? YES
Automated? 1980
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Construction Materials: GRANITE WITH BRICK ABOVE
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

MARSHALL POINT LIGHT TOWER WITH THE ORIGINAL KEEPER'S QUARTERS

MARSHALL POINT LIGHT TOWER WITH THE NEW KEEPER'S QUARTERS


MATINICUS ROCK LIGHT (TWIN TOWERS)

6 MILES SOUTH OF MATINICUS ISLAND 
Station Established: 1827 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1983 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER, FRESNEL 1857 

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

MATINICUS ROCK LIGHT'S TWIN TOWERS

MATINICUS ROCK LIGHTHOUSE, CIRCA 1980


MONHEGAN ISLAND LIGHT

MONHEGAN ISLAND 
Station Established: 1824 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1850 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1959 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK 
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER, FRESNEL 1856 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

MONHEGAN ISLAND LIGHT


MOOSE PEAK LIGHT

MISTAKE ISLAND, FIVE MILES SOUTHEAST OF JONESPORT, MAINE
Station Established: 1827
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1851
Operational? YES
Automated? 1972
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: MASONRY AND STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

MOOSE PEAK LIGHT TOWER WITH ORIGINAL LANTERN ROOM

MOOSE PEAK LIGHT TOWER WITH REPLACEMENT LANTERN ROOM


MOUNT DESERT ROCK LIGHT

MOUNT DESERT ROCK LIGHT 
SOUTH OF MOUNT DESERT ISLAND 
Station Established: 1830 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1847 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1977 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK 
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Tower Shape: CONICAL 
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER, FRESNEL 1858

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

MOUNT DESERT ROCK LIGHT TOWER WITH THE ORIGINAL KEEPER'S DWELLING

MOUNT DESERT ROCK LIGHT TOWER WITH THE 1892 KEEPER'S DWELLING


NARRAGUAGUS (POND ISLAND) LIGHT

NARRAGUAGAS (POND ISLAND) LIGHT, MAINE
NARRAGUAGAS BAY, THE EAST SIDE OF POND ISLAND, MAINE
Station Established: 1853
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1853
Operational? NO
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1934
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL ATTACHED TO WORKROOM
Markings/Pattern: WHITE
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: UNKNOWN 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

NARRAGUAGUS LIGHT TOWER WITH ATTACHED KEEPER'S DWELLING

NARRAGUAGUS LIGHT TOWER AFTER RAZING OF THE DWELLING


NASH ISLAND LIGHT

SE MOUTH OF PLEASANT BAY 
Station Established: 1838 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1874 
Operational? NO 
Automated? YES 1958 
Deactivated: 1982 
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: SQUARE 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1874

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

NASH ISLAND LIGHT


OWLS HEAD LIGHT

OWLS HEAD LIGHT, MAINE
ENTRANCE TO ROCKLAND HARBOR, PENOBSCOT BAY, MAINE
Station Established: 1826
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1826
Operational? YES
Automated? 1989
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: GRANITE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPERATE
Original Lens: REFLECTOR SYSTEM

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

OWLS HEAD LIGHTHOUSE


PEMAQUID POINT LIGHT

Location: Entrance to Muscongus Bay
Station Established: 1827
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1835
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes, 1934
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: Natural, emplaced
Construction Materials: Rubble stone
Tower Shape: Conical
Markings/Pattern: White with black lantern
Relationship to Other Structure: Attached
Original Lens: Argand Lamps

Historical Information:

The United States Government established the original Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, about 1/3 of a mile from Pemaquid Point at the entrance to Muscongus Bay, Maine.  President John Quincy Adams ordered the original structure built in 1827. Later, in 1857, President James Buchanan ordered the light reconstructed.  The current structure is a white, pyramidal tower, 34 feet high and exhibiting its light at 79 feet above sea level.  The only man to ever win the Medal of Honor and the Gold Lifesaving Medal, Marcus A. Hanna, once served as keeper of the light.  The station became automated in 1934.

Keepers (Keeper; Date Appointed):

Isaac Dunham: 3 November 1827
Nathaniel Gammage, Jr.: 13 June 1837
Robert Curtis: 31 July 1849
Samuel C. Tibbetts: 9 April 1853
John Fossett: 12 February 1858
J. Lawler: 29 March 1861
Marcus A. Hanna: 30 July 1869
William L Sartell: 31 July 1873
Charles A. Dolliver: 28 September 1883
Clarence E. Marr: 16 August 1899
Leroy S. Ewell: 1 July 1922

Source:

Labrie, Rose Cushing. The Story of Pemaquid Light: A History of Pemaquid Light Installation. (Hampton, NH: Hampton Publishing Company, Incorporated, 1961).

Photographs (original caption included in quotation marks):

"Pemaquid Point Lightstation, Maine, First Naval District (Boston)."; (75 dpi); (300 dpi); no date/photo number; photographer unknown (probably circa 1940).

"Pemaquid Point, Muscongas Bay, Maine."; (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); no date/photo number; photographer unknown (image is late-nineteenth century).  

"L.H. Pemaquid Point, ME."; (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); no date/photo number; photographer unknown (image is nineteenth century.)

"PEMAQUID POINT."; (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); no date/photo number; photographer unknown.

"Pemaquid Pt.";  (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); 19 March 1975; Photo No. 1CGD 03197501; photographer unknown.

"Pemaquid Point."; (75 dpi) ; (300 dpi); November, 1983; no photo number; photographer unknown.


PERKINS ISLAND LIGHT

PERKINS ISLAND/KENNEBEC RIVER 
Station Established: 1898 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1898 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1959 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: BRICK 
Construction Materials: WOOD 
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/RED LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

PERKINS ISLAND LIGHT TOWER WITH LANTERN ROOM RAILING IN PLACE

PERKINS ISLAND LIGHT TOWER WITHOUT THE LANTERN ROOM RAILING


PETIT MANAN LIGHT

OFF PETIT MANAN POINT NEAR MILBRIDGE, MAINE
Station Established: 1817
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1855
Operational? YES
Automated? 1972
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS W/BRICK LINING
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPERATE
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER FRESNEL LENS

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

PETIT MANAN LIGHTHOUSE

PETIT MANAN LIGHTHOUSE, DIFFERENT VIEW


POND ISLAND LIGHT

KENNEBEC RIVER ENTRANCE WEST SIDE 
Station Established: 1821 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1855 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1963 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK TRIM 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

POND ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE, CIRCA 1885

POND ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE, CIRCA 1980


PORTLAND BREAKWATER LIGHT ("BUG LIGHT")

PORTLAND HARBOR, SOUTH PORTLAND, MAINE
Station Established: 1855
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1875
Operational? NO
Automated? 1934
Deactivated: 1942
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCK CAISSON
Construction Materials: IRON PLATE W/BRICK LINING
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: RESEMBLES 4TH CENTURY GREEK MONUMENT
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: SIXTH ORDER, FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

1855 PORTLAND BREAKWATER LIGHT TOWER

1875 PORTLAND BREAKWATER LIGHT TOWER


PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT

PORTLAND HARBOR/CASCO BAY
Station Established: 1791
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1791
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1989
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: RUBBLE STONE W/BRICK LINING
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1855

Historical Information:

George Washington engaged two masons from the town of Portland in 1787, while Maine was still part of the colony of Massachusetts, and instructed them to take charge of the construction of a lighthouse on Portland Head. They were Jonathan Bryant and John Nichols. George Washington reminded them that the colonial Government was poor and that the materials used to build the lighthouse should be taken from the fields and shores. They could be handled nicely when hauled by oxen on a drag, he said.

The old tower, built of rubblestone, still stands as one of the four colonial lighthouses that have never been rebuilt. Washington gave the masons 4 years to build the tower. While it was under construction the Federal Government was formed in 1789 and it looked for a while, as though the lighthouse would not be finished. But the first Congress made an appropriation and authorized Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury, to inform the mechanics that they could go on with the completion of the tower. The tower was completed during the year 1790 and first lighted January 10, 1791.

During the Civil War, raids on shipping in and out of Portland Harbor became common place, and because of the necessity for ships at sea to sight Portland Head Light as soon as possible, the tower was raised 8 feet. Today Portland Head Light stands 80 feet above ground and 101 feet above water, its white conical tower being connected with a dwelling. The 200,000 candlepower, second-order electric light, is visible 16 miles. An air-chime diaphragm horn blasts every 20 seconds, for 4 seconds during fog.

Photographs:

PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT STATION, PRIOR TO 1891

PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT STATION, POST-1891


PROSPECT HARBOR POINT LIGHT

PROSPECT HARBOR POINT 
Station Established: 1850 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1891 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1951 
Deactivated: 1859-1870 
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS 
Construction Materials: WOOD FRAME 
Tower Shape: CONICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1870 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

1850 PROSPECT HARBOR POINT LIGHT TOWER

1891 PROSPECT HARBOR POINT LIGHT TOWER


PUMPKIN ISLAND LIGHT

NORTHERN ENTRANCE TO EGGEMOGGIN REACH, PENOBSCOT BAY, MAINE
Station Established: 1854
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1854
Operational? NO
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1933
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

PUMPKIN ISLAND LIGHT STATION'S OLD TOWER

CURRENT PUMPKIN ISLAND LIGHT TOWER


RAM ISLAND LEDGE LIGHT

ENTRANCE TO PORTLAND HARBOR, CASCO BAY, CAPE ELIZABETH, MAINE
Station Established: 1905
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1905
Operational? YES
Automated? 1959
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER FRESNEL LENS

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

RAM ISLAND LEDGE LIGHTHOUSE


RAM ISLAND LIGHT

RAM ISLAND/BOOTHBAY HARBOR 
Station Established: 1883 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1883 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1965 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: GRANITE BLOCK CAISSON 
Construction Materials: BRICK ON GRANITE 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/NATURAL CAISSON & BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1881

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

RAM ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


ROCKLAND HARBOR BREAKWATER LIGHT

JAMESON POINT/ROCKLAND HARBOR 
Station Established: 1827 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1902 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1964 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: TIMBER/GRANITE PIER 
Construction Materials: DRESSED STONE/BRICK 
Tower Shape: SQUARE TOWER ON FOG SIGNAL BUILDING 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

ROCKLAND HARBOR BREAKWATER LIGHTHOUSE


SADDLEBACK LEDGE LIGHT

Location: ISLE AU HAUT BAY
Station Established: 1839
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1839
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1954
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK
Construction Materials: GRANITE
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL ON WHITE BASE
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER 1856

Historical Information:

Built in 1839, Saddleback Ledge Lighthouse is one of the most lonely outposts on the Maine coast. I. W. P. Lewis, .who inspected the lighthouse in the early fifties characterized it as "the only establishment on the coast of Maine that possesses any claim whatever to superiority. The sea breaks quite over the lantern in a southwest gale it is the most economical and durable structure that came under my observationthe only one ever erected in New England by an architect and engineer."

"The weirdest experience I have had since being in the service," reported Keeper W. W. Wells in 1935 "was the bombardment we got on a February night way back in 1927, when to my surprise I picked up 124 sea birds around the tower. They were ducks and drakes. Some were alive but the most were dead. Darkness had come on and with it came all the evidence that we were going to get a sou’easter. As the storm struck so did the cannonading Crash. . and a bird came sailing through a pane of glass, dropping at my feet. He began fluttering around the floor with one wing broken and his bill telescoped almost through his head. He did not live long. In came another and away went another windowpane. The phenomenon was repeated again and again until the birds began to pile up like a mound."

"Just when I thought the cannonading had ceased, one big sea drake struck the plate glass in the tower lantern and came through without asking for a transfer. When he struck he broke up the works. Before he stopped he put out the light and broke prisms out of the lens. The bird weighed 10 pounds."   After he had made repairs and got the light burning again, a strange sight greeted the keeper. At the base of the tower was a tremendous heap of sea birds, some dead others alive. "Those that were just dazed" he recounted "and needed to recuperate, we placed in the boathouse and next day they went on their way."

The conical gray tower, with a white base stands 42 feet above ground and 54 feet above water. The 2,000 candlepower, fourth-order incandescent oil vapor fixed white light is visible for 13 miles.

Photographs:

SADDLEBACK LEDGE LIGHTHOUSE


SAINT CROIX RIVER LIGHT

DOCHET ISLAND SAINT CROIX RIVER NEAR CALAIS, MAINE
Station Established: 1857
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1901
Operational? NO
Automated? 1957
Deactivated: 1976
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials: WOOD
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL TOWER ATOP KEEPER’S HOUSE
Markings/Pattern:
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

SAINT CROIX RIVER LIGHTHOUSE


SEGUIN ISLAND LIGHT

Location: KENNEBEC RIVER/SOUTH OF GEORGETOWN 
Station Established: 1795 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1985 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: SURFACE ROCK 
Construction Materials: GRANITE BLOCKS/BRICK 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER, FRESNEL 1857 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

SEGUIN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


SPRING POINT LEDGE LIGHT

WEST SIDE OF PORTLAND HARBOR, SOUTH PORTLAND, MAINE
Station Established: 1897
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1897
Operational? YES
Automated? 1934
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: BRICK/IRON CAISSON
Construction Materials: CAST IRON/BRIK
Tower Shape: CONICAL “SPARK PLUG”
Markings/Pattern: WHITE ON BLACK PIER W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

SPRING POINT LEDGE LIGHTHOUSE


SQUIRREL POINT LIGHT

Location: ARROWSIC ISLAND/KENNEBEC RIVER 
Station Established: 1898 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1898 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1979 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: STONE BLOCK ON SURFACE 
Construction Materials: WOOD 
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL ATTACHED TO SIGNAL BLDG. 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/ BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1902

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

SQUIRREL POINT LIGHTHOUSE


TENANTS HARBOR LIGHT

SOUTHERN ISLAND, TENANTS HARBOR, PENOBSCOT BAY, MAINE
Station Established: 1857
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1857
Operational? NO
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1933
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: BRICKS
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

TENANTS HARBOR LIGHTHOUSE


TWO BUSH ISLAND LIGHT

Location: TWO BUSH CHANNEL/PENOBSCOT BAY APPROACH 
Station Established: 1897 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1897 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1964 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: SQUARE 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER 1897 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

TWO BUSH ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


WEST QUODDY HEAD LIGHT

Location: WEST QUODDY HEAD/BAY OF FUNDY
Station Established: 1808
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1988
Deactivated: n/a
Foundation Materials: MASONRY
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: RED & WHITE BANDS W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER, FRESNEL 1858
Focal Plane: 83 feet above sea level
Visibility: Approximately 18 miles; 35,000 candlepower
Foghorn:  Automated

Historical Information:

  • 1806: Lighthouse at West Passamaquoddy Head, Maine, first authorized by Congress.
  • 1808: Light station established on 21 April 1808 at a cost of $5,000.  The first keeper was Thomas Dexter.
  • 1820: On May 15, Congress authorizes the first fog signal, a 500-pound bell, at the station for a cost of $1,000.
  • 1939: Howard Grey was the last civilian keeper of the station prior to its transfer to the U.S. Coast Guard.
  • 1962: As of 15 August 1962 BM1 Bruce Keene was OIC, or Officer-in-Charge (dates of the time he began and ended his tour are not presently known--he served at least through September 1964.)  According to documents in the West Quoddy file, his father, LT Thomas Keene, had previously served as the head keeper of the light station.
  • 1963: As of 27 October Keene was still OIC and (Engineman?) Richard Copeland was his assistant.
  • 1978: Through 31 May the OIC was BM1 Cliffton Scholfield.  He had a crew of two assistants: MT2 Carl Hatch and MT# Davis Blanding.
  • 1978: On 1 June, BM2 George Eaton took over as the OIC of the station.  He had two assistants.
  • 1979: MK3 Carl Hatch was a member of the crew.
  • 1981: As of 14 September, the OIC was BM1 John Richardson.
  • 1988: The light was automated in July 1988.  The last OIC (keeper) was Malcolm Rouse, USCG.

Photographs:

WEST QUODDY HEAD LIGHT STATION


WHALEBACK LEDGE LIGHT

Location: PORTSMOUTH HARBOR/PISCATAQUA RIVER 
Station Established: 1820 
Year Current / Last Tower(s) First Lit: 1872 
Operational: Yes 
Automated: Yes, 1963 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: Stone / Timber 
Construction Materials: Granite blocks 
Tower Shape: Conical 
Markings/Pattern: Natural 
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral 
Original Lens: Fourth Order, Fresnel, 1855

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

1847 Whaleback Ledge Light: (75 dpi);  no caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

1872 Whaleback Ledge Light: (75 dpi); no caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

Whaleback Ledge Light, circa 1950: (75 dpi); (300 dpi); Original caption: "WHALEBACK LIGHTHOUSE, PORTSMOUTH NH. THIS LIGHTHOUSE IS ON AN ISLAND ABOUT 2 MILES OUT IN PORTSMOUTH HARBOR."; no date (circa 1950); no photo number; photo by PH3 Wade C. Midkiff, USCG.


WHITEHEAD ISLAND LIGHT

Location: WHITEHEAD ISLAND/PENOBSCOT BAY SOUTHERN ENTRANCE 
Station Established: 1807 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1852 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1982 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: GRANITE/ASPHALT 
Tower Shape: CONICAL ATTACHED TO SERVICE ROOM 
Markings/Pattern: NATURAL 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER FIXED, FRESNEL 1855 

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

WHITEHEAD ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE


WHITLOCKS MILL LIGHT

Location: ST. CROIX RIVER SOUTH BANK 
Station Established: 1892 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1910 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1969 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: DRESSED STONE/TIMBER 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1892

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

WHITLOCKS MILL LIGHTHOUSE


WINTER HARBOR LIGHT

Location: MARK ISLAND/WINTER HARBOR 
Station Established: 1856 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1856 
Operational? NO 
Automated? UNK 
Deactivated: 1933 
Foundation Materials: BRICK 
Construction Materials: BRICK/ASPHALT 
Tower Shape: CYLINDRICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1856

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

WINTER HARBOR LIGHTHOUSE


WOOD ISLAND LIGHT

Location: EAST SIDE WOOD ISLAND/SACO RIVER MOUTH 
Station Established: 1808 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1986 
Deactivated: n/a 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: GRANITE RUBBLE 
Tower Shape: CONICAL 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1858

Historical Information:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs:

WOOD ISLAND LIGHT, (TOWER WITH LANTERN ROOM)

WOOD ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE WITHOUT LANTERN ROOM


Last Modified 11/17/2014