Historic Light Station Information
& Photography

FLORIDA


ALLIGATOR REEF LIGHT

Location: FOUR MILES EAST OF INDIAN KEY , NEAR MATECUMBE KEY
Station Established: 1873
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1873
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes, 1963
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: Iron pile with platform
Construction Materials: Iron
Tower Shape: Skeleton
Height: 136-foot tower
Markings/Pattern: White pyramidal framework on black pile foundation, enclosing square dwelling and stair-cylinder; lantern, black.
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: First Order Bivalve, Fresnel, 1873
Characteristic: Flashing white and red, every third flash red, from SW. by W. 1/2 W. through southward to NE. 1/8 E., and from NE. by E. 3/4 E. through northward to SW. 3/8 S.; flashing red throughout the intervening sectors; interval between flashes 5 seconds.
Fog Signal:

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

ALLIGATOR REEF LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


AMELIA ISLAND LIGHT

Location: ENTRANCE TO ST MARY'S RIVER
Station Established: 1839, rebuilt 1885
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1820
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: Stone
Construction Materials: Brick with stucco
Tower Shape: Conical
Height: 107-feet
Markings/Pattern: White brick tower; lantern, black; dwelling detached.
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate
Original Lens: 14 lamps with 15-inch reflectors, 1839; later a Third Order
Characteristic: Flashing white every 90 seconds
Foghorn: None

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

AMELIA ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


AMERICAN SHOAL LIGHT

Location: FLORIDA KEYS
Station Established: 1880
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1880
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes, 1963
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: Screw-pile with platform
Construction Materials: Iron
Tower Shape: Skeletal octagonal pyramidal
Height: 109-feet
Markings/Pattern: Brown with white column
Characteristics: White flash every 15 seconds; 2 red sectors
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: First Order Drum, Fresnel, 1880
Foghorn: None

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

AMERICAN SHOAL LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


ANCLOTE KEYS LIGHT

Location: ANCLOTE KEY AT ANCLOTE RIVER MOUTH; NORTH OF PALM HARBOR ON THE GULF SIDE OF THE FLORIDA PENINSULA
Station Established: 1887
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1887
Operational: No
Automated:
Deactivated: 1984
Foundation Materials: Pilings
Construction Materials: Cast iron
Tower Shape: Skeletal with central cylinder
Height: 110-feet
Markings/Pattern: Brown with black lantern
Characteristics: Four grouped white flashes every 30 seconds; Became one red flash every 30 seconds in 1899.
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate
Original Lens: Third Order, Fresnel, 1887
Foghorn: None

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

ANCLOTE KEY LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


BOCA GRANDE (SEE GASPARILLA ISLAND)

Location: ENTRANCE TO CHARLOTTE HARBOR, GULF OF MEXICO, GASPARILLA ISLAND, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1890
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1890
Operational? NO
Automated? 1950
Deactivated: 1966-1986
Foundation Materials: IRON PILINGS
Construction Materials: WOOD FRAME
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL TOWER ON SQUARE HOUSE
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: THREE AND A HALF ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs

GASPARILLA ISLAND ENTRANCE REAR RANGE LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

GASPARILLA ISLAND LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


CAPE CANAVERAL LIGHT

Location: ONE MILE FROM ATLANTIC OCEAN SHORE AT CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA NEAR COCOA BEACH
Station Established: 1848
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1868
Operational? YES
Automated? 1960
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: BRICK
Construction Materials: CAST IRON PLATE WITH BRICK LINING
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: BLACK AND WHITE BAND, BLACK LANTERN ROOM
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


CAPE FLORIDA LIGHT

Location: SOUTHERNMOST POINT ON KEY BISCAYNE
Station Established: 1825
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1845
Operational: Yes
Automated: Yes, 1976
Deactivated: 1990-1996
Foundation Materials: Brick on coral reef
Construction Materials: Brick with steel stairs
Tower Shape: Conical
Markings/Pattern: Whitewashed red brick with black top
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate
Original Lens: Second Order, Fresnel, 1855

Historical Information:

The Cape Florida Lighthouse was completed in 1825. It was 65 feet high, of solid brick, 5 feet thick at the base. For years it guided the mariner as he passed the dangerous Florida Reef and led him into Cape Florida Channel to a safe anchorage from violent gales in the lee of Key Biscayne.

During the Seminole War, on July 23, 1836, John W. B. Thompson was the assistant keeper.  It was on that day that the lighthouse was attacked by Seminoles.  Thompson writes:

"About p.m. as I was going from the kitchen to the dwelling house, I discovered a large body of Indians within 20 yards of me, back of the kitchen. I ran for the lighthouse, and called out to the old Negro man that was with me to run, for the Indians were near. At that moment they discharged a volley of rifle balls, which cut my clothes and hat and perforated the door in many places. We got in, and as I was turning the key the savages had hold of the door." 

Thompson stationed the African-American at the door and then began firing his three muskets loaded with ball and buckshot, at them from a window. They answered with war cries and musket balls.  Thompson fired at them from some of the other windows and from the top of the lighthouse.

"I kept them from the house until dark.  They then poured in a heavy fire at all the windows and lantern; that was the time they set fire to the door and to the window even with the ground. The window was boarded up with planks and filled with stone inside; but the flames spread fast, being fed with yellow pine wood. Their balls had perforated the tin tanks of oil, consisting of 225 gallons. My bedding, clothing, and in fact everything I had was soaked in oil."

Thompson took one musket with powder keg and balls to the top of the lighthouse, then went below and began to cut away the stairs about half way up from the bottom. "I had difficulty in getting the old Negro up the space I had already cut, but the flames now drove me from my labor, and I retreated to the top of the house."  The keeper covered over the scuttle that led to the lantern, which kept the fire from him for some time. "At last the awful moment arrived," he went on:

"the crackling flames burst around me. The savages at the same time began their hellish yells. My poor Negro looked at me with tears in his eyes, but he could not speak. We went out of the lantern and down on the edge of the platform, 2 feet wide. The lantern was now full of flame, the lamps and glasses bursting and flying in all directions, my clothes on fire, and to move from the place where I was, would be instant death from their rifles. My flesh was roasting, and to put an end to my horrible suffering I got up and threw the keg of gunpowder down the scuttle. Instantly it exploded and shook the tower from top to bottom.  It had not the desired effect of blowing me into eternity, but it threw down the stairs and all the wooden work near the top of the house; it damped the fire for a moment, but it soon blazed as fierce as ever."

The African-American man called out, "I’m wounded."  Then spoke no more.  Those were his last words.  By this time, Thompson had also received many wounds and was literally roasting alive.  He decided to jump off the tower.  "I got up, went inside the iron railing, recommending my soul to God, and was on the point of going head foremost on the rock below when something dictated to me to return and lie down again. I did so, and in 2 minutes the fire fell to the bottom of the house."  A few minutes later a stiff breeze sprung up from the southward that was a great relief to the heat-tortured keeper. The Indians, thinking him dead, left the lighthouse and set fire to the dwelling and began carrying their plunder to the beach, where they made off with it in the keeper’s sloop about 2 a. m.

"I was now almost as bad off as before," the keeper continued, "a burning fever on me, my feet shot to pieces, no clothes to cover me, nothing to eat or drink, a hot sun overhead, a dead man by my side, no friend near or any to expect, and placed between 70 and 80 feet from the earth with no chance of getting down."  The African-American’s body had literally been roasted but there was a piece of his trousers that had escaped the flames by being wet with his blood. With this Thompson made a signal. Some time in the afternoon he saw two boats, with his sloop in tow, coming to the landing. They were the boats of the U. S. schooner Motto, Captain Armstrong, with a detachment of seamen and marines under the command of Lieutenant Thomas J. Leib, of the sloop-of-war Concord. They had retaken Thompson’s sloop, after the Indians had stripped her of sails and rigging. They had heard the explosion, 12 miles off, and had come to his assistance, scarcely expecting to find him alive.

The problem now arose of how to get the keeper down. During the night they made a kite thinking to fly a line to him but to no effect. Then they fired twine from their muskets, made fast to a ramrod, which the keeper received and with it hauled up a tail block, making it fast around an iron stanchion, enabling two men to be hoisted up from below. The keeper was then lowered and was soon on terra firma. He was taken to the military hospital.

Rebuilding of the Cape Florida Light, authorized in 1837, was not completed until 1846 because hostile Indians remained nearby in the Everglades. In 1855 the tower was raised to 95 feet.  The lighting apparatus was destroyed in 1861, during the Civil War, and was not restored until 1867.  Cape Florida Light was discontinued in 1878 when Fowey Rock Light was established, and the tower and property was eventually sold to Mr. James Deering of Chicago.

The state of Florida acquired the property in the 1960s and developed it into the Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park.  Through the cooperation with the Coast Guard, the lighthouse was restored and a glass 375-mm lens was placed atop the structure and a keeper's cottage was built.  The new light was re-lit on 15 June 1978.  It apparently fell into decline during the 1990s but the lighthouse survived Hurricane Andrew with moderate damage.  

Photographs: 

Cape Florida Light Station; original photo caption states: (front-side of photo): "Looking northeasterly at the tower.  Ruins of keeper's dwelling to the left."; (back-side of photo): "CAPE FLORIDA (ABANDONED) 1878, SEVENTH NAVAL DISTRICT BY Ch. COnstr'g Engr. Mar. 18, 1923, Filed Jan. 21, 1929."; 18 March 1923; no photo number.


CAPE ST. GEORGE LIGHT

LITTLE ST GEO ISLAND/GULF OF MEXICO
Station Established: 1833
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1852
Operational? NO
Automated? YES, 1949
Deactivated: 1994
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Height: 65-feet (1833); 72-feet (as of1932)
Characteristics: Fixed White
Foghorn: None
Original Lens: 13 lamps with 15 inch reflectors (1833); Third Order Fresnel  (1852)

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs: 

1833 CAPE SAINT GEORGE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

1852 CAPE SAINT GEORGE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


CAPE SAN BLAS LIGHT

Location: CAPE SAN BLAS
Station Established: 1848
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1885
Operational: No
Automated: Yes, 1981
Deactivated: 1996
Foundation Materials: Iron piling
Construction Materials: Cast iron
Tower Shape: Skeleton around slender cylinder
Markings/Pattern: White with black lantern
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate
Original Lens: Third Order, Fresnel, 1859

Historical Information:

The Cape San BIas Lighthouse was completed in 1849 with an appropriation of $8,000 made 2 years earlier. The shoals running out from the cape extended 4 or 5 miles and made it dangerous for all vessels nearing the coast.  If the light had been high enough it could have been seen for 20 miles and afforded protection to vessels going to and from Tortugas to New Orleans, but the light from the 85- or 90-foot tower was visible only half that distance.  The site was "deemed to be entirely secure from overflow or inundation" by the collector of customs at Apalachicola, Fla., who selected it, with the assistance of "two of our most experienced pilots."

The lighthouse erected in 1849 "fell down during a gale in the autumn of 1851" and on August 31, 1852, Congress appropriated $12,000 for rebuilding it.  The new structure was completed in 1856.  It had been completed only a few months when during the severe storm of August 30, 1856, it too was totally destroyed. "The sea rose so high," the Lighthouse Board reported, "that the waves struck the floor of the keeper’s dwelling, elevated 8 feet above the ground, and about 14 feet above the ordinary tides.  A lagoon now occupies the site of the lighthouse."  On March 3, 1857, Congress, for the third time, appropriated money for a lighthouse at Cape San BIas.  This appropriation was for $20,000 and the new lighthouse was first lighted with a third-order lens on May 1, 1858.

The light station sustained serious damage at the hands of Southern troops during the Civil War.  The keeper’s dwelling was completely destroyed and the door frames and sashes of the tower were torn or burnt out.  Repairs were made, a new illuminating apparatus was provided, and the light was re-exhibited on July 23, 1865.   In 1869 the beach in front of the lighthouse was reported to be washing away and would need protection against encroachments of the sea during heavy storms.  In 1877 Congress appropriated $2,000 for protecting the site after the Lighthouse Board had reported 2 years earlier "The base of the tower is very nearly at the same level as the sea, which is but little more than 150 feet distant, the shore being of shifting sand. In a violent hurricane, it is feared, the tower may be undermined."  The Board had asked for $5,000 to protect the site and reported in 1879 that, as it was found "impracticable to build a jetty for $2,000 that can protect the site from the encroachment of the sea, no further action has been taken in the matter."

Finally in 1881 the Board reported "The sea has been encroaching on this tower until its base is in the water. Brush mattresses were made, pinned down to the sand with small iron screw piles, covered with sand and occasionally blocks of concrete, to further check such encroachment, but the almost constant surf, beating against the mattresses, tore them to pieces.  An appropriation for a new tower, further inland is badly needed. It is recommended that a skeleton iron tower be erected; then if the sea again encroaches, it could be taken down and reerected.  The new tower will cost $25,000."  The following year the Board noted "No appropriation was made; the site remained unprotected and on July 3, 1882, the tower was overthrown and completely destroyed."  The Board strongly recommended that the tower be replaced on a safe site at an early date, there being no intervening light between San BIas and Pensacola, 120 miles distant.

An appropriation for a fourth tower was made available in 1883.  The remains of the third tower were then 400 feet distant from the shore, and the sea continued to erode the beach.  By 1885 a fourth tower, a skeleton tower of iron, and two dwellings for keepers had been erected and the light was first displayed on June 30, 1885.  The light had a third-order lens, showing alternate red and white flashes with 30 seconds intervals. The focal plane, 98 feet above sea level, lit the entire horizon.

In 1887 the sea was reported again gradually cutting away the shore and during the year had washed away about one-third the distance to where the new tower had been built (300 feet).  Two years later only 200 feet of beach remained and the Board reported "It is more than probable that this will be mostly washed away in the next 4 months."  It was, therefore, recommended "that the tower and dwellings be taken down and removed to a point on the inside of the peninsula a little less than 1 1/2 miles, about northwest from its present position where there is a good site and 8 1/2 feet of water, in St. Joseph’s Bay, within 400 or 500 yards of it.  This location is such that the bearing of the San Blas Shoals will be the same as now, and the increase of 1 1/2 miles in the distance from the shore will be of little importance so far as its value as a coast light is concerned.  It is estimated that to make the change will cost $20,000.  The present site cannot be saved except at great cost."

Nothing had been done, however, by Congress and by early 1890 the tower was only 144 feet from the sea at high water mark.  Later that year, however, an appropriation of $20,000 was made to remove the tower and dwellings to the point inside the peninsula. Condemnation proceedings to obtain title to the new site, however, dragged on until 1894 when on October 8 and 9 a gale badly damaged the lighthouse extinguishing the light and wrecking the keeper’s dwelling.  So much of the cape was washed away that the tower now stood in the water.

Before the tower could be removed to the new site, it was decided in 1895 to remove the station to Black’s Island, in St. Joseph’s Bay, which the President ordered reserved for lighthouse purposes.  The work of dismantling the skeleton iron tower was begun in February 1896 and carried on until April 30 of that year when it was stopped because the appropriation was exhausted.  The two keeper’s houses had been relocated on Black’s Island, the foundation for the tower was in place and three-fourths of the concrete work had been done, when it was estimated that $4,500 more would be required to finish the work.  This was appropriated in June 1897.

Four months later, however, the light had been reestablished in the old tower, now in the water at the south point of Cape San Blas.  In 1899 the Board reported "after careful consideration of all the conditions affecting the choice of a proper site, the Board has concluded that the light should be reconstructed on the shell ridge about 13 s miles N. by W. from its present location.  It is estimated that this can be done at a cost not exceeding $15,000."  This sum was appropriated on June 6, 1900, at which time the Board reported: "that the property and material stored at Black’s Island was being cared for by a watchman appointed for the purpose."

By 1901 nothing had been done about moving the tower and the Board reported "the advisability of removing the station to a new site is being considered, or of building a permanent keeper’s dwelling in place of the present temporary buildings, repairing the present light tower and permitting it to remain in the old location. The point of land on which the tower stands has made out until the beach at the nearest point is 100 or more feet distant from the tower.  As this movement is increasing, it may become necessary to move the structure of the station to a new site."  In 1903 the Board sought and obtained authority from Congress to use $7,000 of the $15,000 appropriated for moving the tower, to erect two keeper’s dwellings at the old site. These were completed in 1905.

The light remained in the old tower until 1919. In 1916 it was reported "The sea is again making inroads on the station and a project for its removal has been tentatively approved."  The new site was one-fourth mile north of the old tower on the peninsula and on land heretofore reserved for military purposes, which the President forthwith reserved for lighthouse purposes. The tower was moved to this site in 1919.   In 1923 the Black’s Island reservation was sold.  There were no buildings on the island at the time.

The light is now in a white, square skeleton tower, enclosing a stair cylinder, with the lantern 96 feet above ground and 101 feet above water.  The 800,000 candlepower 3’ 2-order electric light flashes white every 20 seconds and is visible 16 miles. A radiobeacon was established at the station in 1939.

Photographs: 

1859 CAPE SAN BLAS LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

1885 CAPE SAN BLAS LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


CARYSFORT REEF LIGHT

Location: Carysfort Reef, near Key Largo
Station Established: 1825
Year Current / Last Tower(s) First Lit: 1852
Operational: Yes
Automated: 1960
Deactivated: No
Foundation Materials: Iron Screwpile
Construction Materials: Iron
Tower Shape: Skeletal Octagonal Pyramidal
Tower Height:100 feet above water
Markings/Pattern: Red
Characteristic: "Gp. Fl. W., 3 R. sectors, 20 Sec., 3 flashes" (1933 Light List)
Relationship to Other Structure: Integral
Original Lens: First Order Revolving “HENRY LEPAUTE”
Fog Signal: None

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society volunteer.

Photographs: 

CARYSFORT REEF LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


CEDAR KEYS LIGHT

Location: SEA HORSE KEY
Station Established: 1854
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1854
Operational? NO
Automated? N/A
Deactivated: 1915
Foundation Materials: GRANITE PILE W/PLATFORM
Construction Materials: BRICK WITH WOODEN ADDITIONS ADDED AFTER DECOMMISSIONING; (Wood additions added in 1905 for increased occupants of the light station when the Navy Department requested that the Bureau of Equipment be permitted to erect and maintain a wireless telegraph station on the light house reservation.**)
Tower Shape: HEXAGONAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE TOWER ON DWELLING
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

**Additional information provided by Toni C. Collins, Levy County, Florida, Historian.

Photographs: 

CEDAR KEYS LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption; circa 1894; photographer unknown.


CHARLOTTE HARBOR LIGHT

Location: CHARLOTTE HARBOR LIGHT GULF OF MEXICO, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1890
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 18
Operational? NO
Automated? 1918
Deactivated: 1943
Foundation Materials: IRON PILINGS
Construction Materials: WOODEN
Tower Shape: N/A
Markings/Pattern: N/A
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: N/A

Historical Information

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

CHARLOTTE HARBOR LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


COSGROVE SHOAL LIGHT

Location: IN 14 FEET OF WATER, 20 MILES WSW OF KEY WEST, SOUTH OF THE MARQUESAS KEYS
Station Established: 1935
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1935
Operational: No
Automated: 1935
Deactivated: 
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Black tankhouse on red hexagonal skeleton tower on piles
Height: 49-feet
Original lens: 200mm
Characteristic: Flashing white: 4 flashes 0.4 seconds each, 3 eclipses 1.6 seconds each, 1 eclipse 5.6 seconds
Fog Signal: Bell on buoy 

Historical Information:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


CROOKED RIVER (CARRABELLE) LIGHT

Location: CROOKED RIVER, NEAR CARRABELLE FLORIDA
Station Established: 1895
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1895
Operational? Yes
Automated? 1965
Deactivated: 1995
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE
Construction Materials: IRON
Tower Shape: SQUARE SKELETAL W/CYLINDER
Markings/Pattern: LOWER WHITE/UPPER RED/BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.  Current information was provided by John Canetta, historian for the Carabelle Lighthouse Association.

Photographs: 

CROOKED RIVER LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.  photo was probably taken between 1965-1976.


DAMES POINT LIGHT

Location: ON THE SHOALS OFF DAMES POINT, ST. JOHNS RIVER
Station Established: 1857
Year Current/Last Tower(s) First Lit: 1972
Operational: No
Automated: No
Deactivated: Yes, 1893
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: 
Height: 
Original lens: 
Characteristic: Fixed white light
Fog Signal: 

Historical Information:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


DOG ISLAND LIGHT

Location: NORTHWEST FLORIDA, GULF OF MEXICO FLORIDA
Station Established: 1839
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1873
Operational? NO
Automated? NO
Deactivated: 1873
Foundation Materials: N/A
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: N/A
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: N/A

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

DOG ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


DRY TORTUGAS (LOGGERHEAD KEY) LIGHT

Location: LOGGERHEAD KEY, FAR WESTERN END OF DRY TORTUGAS, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1858
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? YES
Automated? 1988
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: STONE 
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: UPPER BLACK, LOWER WHITE
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Click here for a historical chronology written by David Cipra.

Photographs: 

DRY TORTUGAS LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


EGMONT KEY LIGHT

Location: TAMPA BAY ACROSS FROM FORT DESOTO
Station Established: 1848 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1989 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: STONE 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: CONICAL (LANTERN REMOVED) 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER BIVALVE, FRESNEL 

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society.

Photographs: 

EGMONT KEY LIGHT TOWER WITH LANTERN ROOM; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

EGMONT KEY LIGHT TOWER WITHOUT LANTERN ROOM; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


FORT BARRANCAS RANGE LIGHTS (PENSACOLA)

Location: WESTERN END OF FLORIDA PANHANDLE GULF OF MEXICO
          Front Range Light: ON THE BEACH NEAR FORT BARRANCAS, NORTHERLY SIDE OF THE WESTERLY END OF PENSACOLA BAY (30 20' 45" N x 87 18' 08 W)
          Rear Range Light: ON BLUFF, 400 FEET N. 3/4 E. IN REAR OF THE PRECEDING (30 20' 49" N x 87 18' 07" W)
Station Established: 1859
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 
Operational? NO 
Automated? N/A 
Deactivated: 1930
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials: 
Tower Shape: PYRAMIDAL SKELETAL TOWER
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

FORT BARRANCAS REAR RANGE LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


FORT MCRAE RANGE LIGHTS (PENSACOLA)

Location: EAST END OF PERDIDO KEY, GULF OF MEXICO, FLORIDA PANHANDLE NEAR PENSACOLA FLORIDA
          Front Range Light: SOUTHWESTERLY FROM THE RUINS OF FORT McREE, ABOUT 800 FEET BACK FROM THE BEACH, ON THE WESTERLY SIDE OF THE ENTRANCE TO PENSACOLA BAY (30 19' 11" N s 87 19' 18" W)
          Rear Range Light: IN BIG LAGOON, 850 FEET NW. BY W. 7/8 W. IN REAR OF THE PRECEDING (30 19' 14" N x 87  18' 08" W)
Station Established: 1859 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1888
Operational? NO 
Automated? N/A 
Deactivated: 1906
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials: 
Tower Shape: SQUARE PYRAMIDAL FRAMEWORK WITH TUBULAR LANTERN
Markings/Pattern: FRONT RANGE-WHITE, REAR RANGE RED
Relationship to Other Structure: 
Original Lens: 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

FORT MCRAE RANGE LIGHT STATION; no photo number/caption; photo dated 6 December 1892; photographer unknown.

FORT MCRAE  REAR RANGE LIGHT; "Fort McRae (rear)"; photo dated 6 December 1892; no photo number; photographer unknown.


FOWEY ROCKS LIGHT

Location: OFF KEY BISCAYNE 
Station Established: 1878 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1878 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1974 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: SCREW PILE W/PLATFORM 
Construction Materials: CAST IRON 
Tower Shape: SKELETAL 
Markings/Pattern: BROWN/WHITE 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER DRUM, FRESNEL 1878 BUILT BY LEPAUTE

Historical Information:

Notable Shipwrecks:

Keepers: 

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society.

Photographs: 

FOWEY ROCKS LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


GARDEN KEY/TORTUGAS HARBOR (FORT JEFFERSON) LIGHT

Location: GARDEN KEY/DRY TORTUGAS
Station Established:  JULY 1824
Year First Tower Lit:  4 JULY 1826
Operational?  NO
Automated? Yes, 1912
Deactivated:  YES, 1924
Foundation Materials: 
Construction Materials:  Brick (first tower); boilerplate iron (second tower)
Tower Shape:  Hexagonal (second tower)
Height:  70 FEET
Markings/Pattern: 
Characteristic:    .
Original Lens: 4TH ORDER
Foghorn:

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

GARDEN KEY (FORT JEFFERSON) LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


GASPARILLA ISLAND (SEE BOCA GRANDE LIGHT) LIGHT


HEN AND CHICKENS SHOAL LIGHT

Location: IN 19 FEET OF WATER, SOUTHEAST OF SHOAL, 2 MILES SOUTHEAST OF PLANTATION KEY
Station Established: 1929
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1929
Operational: Yes
Automated: 1929
Deactivated: 
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Red pointer and tank house on skeleton structure on piles
Height: 35-feet
Original lens: Range lens (acetylene gas, compressed)
Characteristic:  Flashing red, 3 seconds
Fog Signal: None

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


HILLSBORO INLET LIGHT

Location: NORTH SIDE HILLSBORO INLET 
Station Established: 1907 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1907 
Operational? YES 
Automated? YES 1974 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: IRON PILING 
Construction Materials: IRON 
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL SKELETAL W/CYLINDER 
Markings/Pattern: LOWER THIRD WHITE/UPPER BLACK 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: SECOND ORDER BIVALVE, FRESNEL 1907

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society.

Photographs: 

HILLSBORO INLET LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


JUPITER INLET LIGHT

Location: LOXAHATCHEE & INDIAN RIVER JUNCTION 
Station Established: 1860 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1860 
Operational: YES 
Automated: YES 1928 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: OYSTER SHELLS 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Tower of red brick, natural color; oil-house near tower.  One-and-a-half story stone dwelling and two-story white dwelling.
Height: 146-feet 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER, FRESNEL 1860
Characteristic: Fixed white varied by a white flash every 90 seconds
Foghorn: None 

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Light House Society.

Photographs: 

JUPITER INLET LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


KEY WEST LIGHT

Location: WHITEHEADS POINT 
Station Established: 1825 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1895 
Operational? NO 
Automated: ?  
Deactivated: 1969 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: White tower and black lantern,; detached white dwelling with green blinds.
Height: 90-1/2 feet
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate 
Original Lens: Third Order, Fresnel, 1847
Characteristic: Fixed white from N. 1/4 W. through to NE 5/8 E., from NE. by E. 13/16 E. through westward to SE. 3/8 E. and from SE 1/8 S. through northward and eastward to NW. 1/4 N., fixed red throughout the intervening sectors.
Fog Horn: None

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Photographs: 

PRE-1894 KEY WEST LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

POST-1894 KEY WEST LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


LOGGERHEAD KEY LIGHT (See entry for DRY TORTUGAS)


MOLASSES REEF LIGHT

Location: APPROXIMATELY 8 MILES SOUTHEAST OF KEY LARGO, IN 9 FEET OF WATER OFF MOLASSES REEF
Station Established: 1921
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1921
Operational? NO 
Automated? 1921
Deactivated: 
Foundation Materials: SCREWPILE
Construction Materials: 
Tower Shape: SQUARE, PYRAMIDAL SKELETAL TOWER
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: 
Original Lens:

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

MOLASSES REEF LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


NORTHWEST PASSAGE LIGHT (KEY WEST)

Location: APPROACH TO KEY WEST, GULF OF MEXICO, KEY WEST FLORIDA, IN 4 FEET OF WATER, ON THE WESTERLY SIDE OF THE NORTHERLY END OF NORTHWEST CHANNEL TO KEY WEST HARBOR
Station Established: 1838
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1879
Operational? NO
Automated? 1911
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: IRON PILINGS
Construction Materials: WOOD FRAME 
Tower Shape: SQUARE COTTAGE WITH LATTERN ON TOP
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FIFTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

NORTHWEST PASSAGE LIGHT; Caption: "7th Dist. Photos [;] Northwest Passage Lt. Sta. [;] 689 - Northwest Passage, Florida [;]  7th Dist. Photogr. [illegible] with 8th Engr's letter of 1 July 1892 - filed 25 Jan. .00-"; Photo No. 689;  photographer unknown.


PACIFIC REEF LIGHT

Location: BISCAYNE BAY, APPROXIMATELY 3 MILES SOUTHEAST OF ELLIOTT KEY, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1921
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1921
Operational? YES
Automated? YES
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: SCREWPILE
Construction Materials: 
Tower Shape: SQUARE PYRAMIDAL SKELETAL TOWER
Markings/Pattern: 
Relationship to Other Structure: 
Original Lens: 

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

PACIFIC REEF LIGHTHOUSE; Caption: "Pacific Reef Light"; Photo No. 7CGD 100166 #35; photo dated 1966; photographer unknown.


PENSACOLA LIGHT

Location: ENTRANCE TO PENSACOLA BAY
Station Established: 1825 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858 
Operational: Yes 
Automated: Yes, 1965 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: Granite 
Construction Materials: Brick 
Tower Shape: Conical attached to original keepers dwelling 
Markings/Pattern: Brick tower, lower third, white; upper tow-thirds, and lantern, dome and cowl, black
Height: 190-3/4 feet 
Relationship to Other Structure: Attached 
Original: First Order, Revolving, 1859
Characteristic: Flashing white every minute

Historical Information:

Researched and written by Melissa Buckler, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

PENSACOLA LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

PENSACOLA BAR BEACON LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


PENSACOLA BAR BEACON

Location: FOUR HUNDRED AND FIFTY-EIGHT FEET SEE. 1/8 E. IN FRONT OF THE PENSACOLA LIGHT
Station Established: 1855
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1879
Operational: No
Automated: ?
Deactivated: ?
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Front of beacon, white; sides, black.
Height: 55-feet
Relationship to Other Structure: Detached
Original lens: Sixth Order 
Characteristic: Fixed white
Fog Signal: None 

Photographs: 

PENSACOLA BAR BEACON LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


PONCE DE LEON (MOSQUITO) INLET LIGHT

Location: SOUTH OF DAYTONA BEACH
Station Established: 1835
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1887
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1953
Deactivated: 1970-1982
Foundation Materials: BRICK
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Height: 45 feet (original tower); 175 feet (current tower)
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: RED W/BLACK LANTERN, COPPER ROOF
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE
Original Lens: First Order Fresnel, 1887

Historical Information:

Chronology was researched and written by Diane Hackney.

Photographs: 

MOSQUITO INLET LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


PULASKI SHOAL LIGHT

Location: IN 15 FEET OF WATER ON THE EAST SIDE OF PULAKSI SHOAL, ABOUT 30 MILES NW OF KEY WEST, NORTH OF DRY TORTUGAS
Station Established: 1935
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1935
Operational: No
Automated: 1935
Deactivated: Yes
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Black skeleton tower on piles.
Height: 49-feet
Original lens: 500mm
Characteristic: Flashing white, flash 0.4 seconds eclipse 2.6 seconds
Fog Signal: None 

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

PULASKI SHOAL LIGHTHOUSE; Caption: "Pulaski Shoal"; Photo No. 7CGD 100166 #13; Photo dated 1966; photographer unknown.


REBECCA SHOAL LIGHT

Location: ON A CORAL BANK 43 MILES WEST OF KEY WEST 
Station Established: 1886
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: N/A 
Height of Focal Plane: 66”
Operational? NO
Automated: 1925
Deactivated: 1953 
Foundation Materials: IRON SCREWPILES
Construction Materials: IRON AND WOOD
Tower Shape: TWO AND A HALF STORY DWELLING WITH LIGHT ON TOP
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER FRESNEL LENS

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

REBECCA SHOAL LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


SAND KEY LIGHT

Location: 7 MILES SOUTHWEST OF KEY WEST, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1826 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1853
Operational? YES
Automated? 1938
Deactivated: 1998
Foundation Materials: IRON SCREWPILES W/PLATFORM
Construction Materials: IRON
Tower Shape: SQARE SKELETAL W/CENTRAL COLUMN
Markings/Pattern: RED W/BLACK TRIM
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Photographs: 

SAND KEY LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number; "Sand Key Light Station, Fla., Seventh Naval District (JAX)"; no date; photographer unknown.

SAND KEY LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


SANIBEL ISLAND LIGHT

Location: POINT YBEL, EASTERLY END OF SANIBEL ISLAND, AND THE WESTERLY SIDE OF THE ENTRANCE TO SAN CARLOS BAY AND THE PORT OF PUNTA RASA 
Station Established: 1884 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1885 
Operational: Yes 
Automated: Yes, 1949 
Deactivated: N/A 
Foundation Materials: Iron pile 
Construction Materials: Iron 
Tower Shape: Square, pyramidal, skeleton, iron framework, inclosing stair-cylinder and surmounted by lantern; all brown.  Two white dwellings near tower. 
Markings/Pattern: Brown
Height: 98-feet 
Relationship to Other Structure: Separate 
Original Lens: Third Order, Fresnel, 1884
Characteristic: Fixed white varied by a white flash every 2 minutes (1901)

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

Photographs: 

SANIBEL ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE; Caption: "SANIBEL ISLAND LIGHT STATION, FLA. [;] SEVENTH NAVAL DISTRICT (JAX)."; September, 1933; no photo number; photographer unknown.


SMITH SHOAL LIGHT

Location: IN 20 FEET OF WATER, ON NORTHEAST END OF SMITH SHOAL, ABOUT 11 MILES NNW OF KEW WEST
Station Established: 1933
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1933
Operational: No
Automated: 1933
Deactivated: Yes
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Black tank house on white hexagonal pyramidal skeleton tower on piles.
Height: 49-feet
Original lens: Fourth Order
Characteristic: Flashing white, flash every 1 second.
Fog Signal: None 

Historical Information:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


SOMBRERO KEY LIGHT

Location: Near Marathon Key; 24 37' 6" N x 81 06' 6" W
Station Established: 1858
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1858
Operational? YES
Automated? YES, 1960
Deactivated: n/a
Height: 166 ft.; 142' above water
Foundation Materials: IRON PILE W/DISCS
Construction Materials: CAST IRON
Tower Shape: SKELETAL OCTAGONAL PYRAMIDAL
Markings/Pattern: BROWN
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FIRST ORDER, FRESNEL 1858

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

SOMBRERO KEY LIGHTHOUSE; possibly a B&W version of the below photo; no photo number/caption; 1971 (?); photographer unknown (PH3 Dan R. Boyd, USCG?).

SOMBRERO KEY LIGHTHOUSE; no photo number/caption; photo dated "c. 1971"; photo by PH3 Dan R. Boyd, USCG (color, 300 dpi).


ST. AUGUSTINE LIGHT

Location: ANASTASIA ISLAND
Station Established: 1821
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1874
Operational? YES
Automated? YES 1955
Deactivated:
Foundation Materials: BRICK ON COQUINA
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Height: 52 feet (1st); 165 feet (2nd)
Tower Shape: CONICAL ATTACHED TO STORAGE BLDG.
Markings/Pattern: BLACK/WHITE SPIRAL BANDS W/RED LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: ATTACHED
Characteristics: 3 minute fixed flash; in 1936 changed to 30-second flash
Original Lens: First Order Fresnel, 1874

Historical Information:

The above was researched and written by Diane Hackney.

Photographs: 

1824 SAINT AUGUSTINE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

1874 SAINT AUGUSTINE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


ST. JOHNS LIGHT

Location: ENTRANCE TO ST. JOHNS RIVER, MAYPORT, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1954
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1954
Operational? YES
Automated? 1967
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: CONCRETE
Construction Materials: CONCRETE
Tower Shape: OCTAGONAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE SQUARE TOWER ON BUILDING
Relationship to Other Structure: NONE
Original Lens: Crouse-Hinds Company 250,000 candlepower airway beacon-type light
Characteristic: Group flashing white light every 20 seconds, flash 1 second, eclipse 1.5 seconds, flash 1 second, eclipse 1.5 seconds, flash 1 second, eclipse 11.5 seconds; with red sector from 174 to 195, white from 196 to 000
Fog Signal: Diaphram air horn

Historical Information:

Photographs: 

SAINT JOHNS LIGHT; Caption: "View of light and main building of St. John's Light Station, at Mayport, Fla., from the water side."; Photo No. 25July 1955(1), 1 of a series of 12; Photo date 25 July 1955; photographer unknown.


ST. JOHNS RIVER (MAYPORT) LIGHT

Location: ENTRANCE ST. JOHNS RIVER 
Station Established: 1830 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1859 
Operational? NO 
Automated: Yes 
Deactivated: 1929 
Foundation Materials: NATURAL/EMPLACED 
Construction Materials: BRICK 
Tower Shape: CONICAL 
Markings/Pattern: RED W/WHITE LANTERN
Height: 80-feet 
Relationship to Other Structure: SEPARATE 
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER, FRESNEL 1867 

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society.

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


ST. JOSEPH POINT (BEACON HILL) REAR RANGE LIGHT

Location: RELOCATED FROM PORT ST. JOE/ST. JOSEPH BAY 
Station Established: 1902 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1902 
Operational? NO 
Automated? UNK 
Deactivated: 
Foundation Materials: RELOCATED TO SIMMONS BAYOU 
Construction Materials: WOOD 
Tower Shape: SQUARE ON SQUARE HOUSE 
Markings/Pattern: WHITE W/RED ROOF W/OUT LANTERN 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: THIRD ORDER

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Photographs: 

SAINT JOSEPH POINT REAR RANGE LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

SAINT JOSEPH POINT FRONT RANGE LIGHT; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


ST. MARKS (REAR RANGE) LIGHT

Location: APPALACHEE BAY, ENTRANCE TO ST. MARKS RIVER, NEAR TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Station Established: 1831 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1842
Operational? YES
Automated? 1960
Deactivated: N/A
Foundation Materials: STONE
Construction Materials: BRICK
Tower Shape: CONICAL
Markings/Pattern: WHITE WITH BLACK LANTERN
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER FRESNEL

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Photographs: 

1840 SAINT MARKS REAR RANGE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.

1867 SAINT MARKS REAR RANGE LIGHT TOWER; no photo number/caption/date; photographer unknown.


TENNESSEE REEF LIGHT

Location: IN 15 FEET OF WATER ON WEST SIDE OF SHOAL, SOUTH OF LONG KEY
Station Established: 1933 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1933 
Operational: No 
Automated: 1933
Deactivated: Yes
Tower Shape / Markings / Pattern: Black; tank house on hexagonal, pyramidal skeleton tower, on piles.
Height: 49-feet 
Original lens: Fourth Order
Characteristic: Flashing white, flash 0.3 seconds
Fog Signal: None 

Historical Information:

Shipwrecks:

Researched and written by Marie Vincent, a volunteer through the Chesapeake Chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society

Photographs: 

TENNESSEE REEF LIGHT; Caption: "Tennessee Reef Light, Florida"; Photo No. 7CGD 011166 #2; Photo dated 1966; photographer unknown.


TORTUGAS HARBOR (FORT JEFFERSON) LIGHT

Location: GARDEN KEY/DRY TORTUGAS ISLANDS 
Station Established: 1826 
Year Current Tower(s) First Lit: 1876 
Operational? YES 
Automated? NO 
Deactivated: 1924 – BUT CONTINUED AS A PRIVATE AID 
Foundation Materials: BRICK PARAPET 
Construction Materials: IRON 
Tower Shape: HEXAGONAL 
Markings/Pattern: BLACK 
Relationship to Other Structure: INTEGRAL 
Original Lens: FOURTH ORDER, FRESNEL 1858 
Status: OPERATED AS A PRIVATE AID TO NAVIGATION

Historical Information:

Keepers:

Assistant Keepers:

PHOTOGRAPH NOT AVAILABLE


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Last Modified 1/7/2014