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World War II Coast Guard-Manned

U.S. Army Freight and Supply Ship Histories


Under a Joint Chiefs of Staff agreement signed 14 March 1944, the Coast Guard was designated to man certain small Army Transportation Corps vessels (with some already operating in the Southwest Pacific and manned at the time by civilians).  The agreement reads: "The Coast Guard, due to decrease in category of defense in the United States, will have some personnel available to man ships and craft for which civilian personnel cannot be obtained."  

Five categories of Army vessels were specified for Coast Guard crews: AMRS (Army Marine Repair Ship), TY (tankers), LT (large tugs), FS (freight and supply vessels), and F (Freight vessels).  The Coast Guard manned a total of 288 of these Army craft.  One, the FS-34, was was of the type "Design 277", FS-140 through FS-234 were "Design 330," and the rest were "Design 381."  The following are the FS Army vessels manned by Coast Guard crews:


A photo of the USS FS177 at anchor in the Pacific
The Coast Guard-manned Army supply vessel
FS-177.   The famous movie Mister Roberts revolved around life on a FS vessel.


FS-34

The Coast Guard accepted the Army vessel, FS-34, on 22 May 1945. On 4 October 1945, she was ordered to proceed to Ketchikan for further transfer to DCGO, 13th Naval District. On 6 October 1945, she departed Dutch Harbor for Kodiak and Ketchikan for Seattle. On 25 January 1946 she was at sea on a freight and supply run to Spring Island and DCGO, Seattle, advised that she would be turned back to the Army on her arrival in Seattle. On 30 January 1946, she was decommissioned as a Coast Guard-manned vessel and returned to the Army on 6 February 1946.

 

FS-140

Coast Guard-manned FS-140 was accepted on 31 October 1944 and was used for training at Pascagoula, MS; Tampa, FL, Brownsville, TX; Gulfport, MS; Mobile, AL; Corpus Christi, TX; Pensacola, FL, etc.

 

FS-141

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-141 was commissioned while in the Southwest Pacific area in October 1944, with LT W.J. Holbert, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned and operated in the Southwest Pacific area in the Philippines and Hawaii.

 

FS-142

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-142 was commissioned 20 September 1944 while in the Southwest Pacific area. She operated there and in Hawaii and Australia.  She was decommissioned 13 October 1945.

 

FS-143

The FS-143 was reported in the Southwest Pacific area on 26 June 1944.  She operated in New Guinea.

 

FS-144

The FS-144 was commissioned 27 October 1944. She was in the Southwest Pacific area on 26 June 1944. She operated in New Guinea. She was decommissioned 13 October 1945.

 

FS-145

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-145 was commissioned 2 May 1944 at Los Angeles.  Her commanding officers have been LTJG H.H. Sandridge Jr., LTJG Jack Patterson, USCGR (7 October 1945) and LT Lloyd C. Wilson, USCGR (29 October 1945).  She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Manila and Hawaii.

 

FS-146

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-146 was commissioned at Los Angeles on 21 April 1944. Her commanding officers have been LDCR William Moss, USCGR, LTJG Fred S. Pillsbury, USCGR and LTJG Charles C. Sears, USCG (26 September 1945). She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated in Hawaii.

 

FS-147

The Coast Guard began manning Army vessel FS-147 on 27 February 1945. Her first commanding officer was LT Oscar Berg, USCGR. He was succeeded by ENS Harry J. Kolebeck (20 November 1945). Kolebeck was soon succeeded by LTJG John D. Massman (27 November 1945). The ship was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated in Hawaii.

 

FS-148

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-148 was commissioned 24 April 1944 and reported in the Southwest Pacific area on 26 June 1944.  She operated in Hawaii and the Philippines.  Her commanding officers have been LTJG John I. Moore, USCG and ENS Chester B. Brach, USCGR (5 October 1945). She was decommissioned 7 October 1945.  On 8 October 1945, command was transferred to Augustin Monzon, Master.

 

FS-149

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-149 was commissioned at Los Angeles on 21 April 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LT Jack V. Lum, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LT Montford F. Gallagher, USCGR, and LTJG Richard A. Gall, USCG on 2 November 1945.  She was assigned and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-150

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-150 was commissioned 20 September 1944 in the Southwest Pacific area where she operated.  On the morning of 21 June 1945 at 0620 according to a report signed by LTJG D.W. Ellis, commanding officer, the FS-150, out of Hollandia and bound for Finschaven, New Guinea, received an SOS from the U.S. Liberty Ship Millen Griffiths stating that it had run aground on the coast of New Guinea, just north of Finschaven and that it had a "strong leak."  The FS-150 immediately set course for the given position of the grounded vessel and at 0716 was standing by her to offer whatever assistance she could give. The Liberty ship had over 1000 Australian troops aboard which the FS-150 offered to help evacuate. There had been a storm earlier that morning, however, and as the sea was still rough, the master of the Millen Griffiths decided to wait for better conditions before having the troops removed.  The FS-150 stood by until 0830 when two tugs arrived on the scene and being signaled that it could be of no further assistance the FS-150 proceeded to Finschaven.  At 1025 the FS-150 and FS-176 were asked by the Army to go back to the Griffiths to stand by for further assistance and they were so doing by 1115.  At 1520 the FS-150 moved alongside the Griffiths and began taking her troops aboard, and at 1730 cast off all lines and set course for Finschaven with approximately 500 troops aboard.  The FS-176 also removed about 500 troops from the stricken vessel and by 1900 the 1000 or so troops had been sent ashore at Finschaven.

 

FS-151

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-151 was commissioned at New Orleans on 17 April 1944.  By 26 June 1944, the vessel was in the Southwest Pacific area.  On 23 July 1945 at 0648, in position 02 59' N, 133 20' E, while en route from Biak to the Philippines the Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-142 intercepted an SOS distress message from an unknown vessel on 500 kilocycles.  After obtaining D/F bearings to verify position given in distress message, the course was changed to close that position some 80 miles away.  The distressed vessel could not decode a message stating the ETA.  All subsequent radio communication was in plain language.  The distressed vessel was sighted at 1640 and the FS-142 arrived on scene at 1730.

Present was USMC type N-3 vessel William F. Howard which had arrived about 30 minutes earlier and was lying one mile off the reef.  The distressed vessel was the FS-151 stranded on the east side of Helen Reef, 6 miles from Helen Island in position 02 52' N, 131 40' E, heading in a northeasterly direction, drawing 4.5 feet of water forward and normal draft aft.  Breakers were about her port side resulting from a moderate SW wind and the sea was sweeping the reef. The starboard side of the FS-151 was in deeper water.  Her booms were swung out to port.  Two warps were out astern leading to deeper water.  The FS-142 closed the distressed vessel and following blinker conversation regarding the general situation it was decided at 1800 to try pulling her off on the chance that she was not badly stranded.  After the third attempt, a cable was passed and made fast to FS-151 at 1826.  The cable broke loose from the bit of the FS-151, but the distressed vessel did not budge.

Further attempts were abandoned because of darkness, strong currents and inadaptability of the FS-142 to such work.  It was obvious that it would take a powerful tug to get the FS-151 off.  At 1910 the Howard departed and at 1950 the FS-142 advised the FS-151 that they would be standing by at some distance off the reef because of possible enemy submarine attack following the plain language communications.  The FS-151's personnel were in no immediate danger.  At 2110 an intercepted message from Nerk, a naval war vessel, to FS-151 stated that she would stand by off the reef and close in the morning if no immediate assistance was required.  The FS-142 advised that she was in the vicinity also.  At 0830 on 27 July 1945, present at the scene were DE-367 (SOPA), APD-11, an Australian J-boat and a commercial tanker.  After blinker conversation with SOPA regarding previous day's experience and stating the opinion that FS-151 was higher on reef than previous evenings SOPA decided to try and requested FS-142 to stand by.  At 0942 SOPA advised that an ocean going tug was approaching and that FS-142 could proceed.  After confirming, by blinker, that no further help was needed, FS-142 proceeded back to course and to destination.  The FS-151 was apparently successfully floated.  On 12 October 1945 she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed on 13 October 1945.

 

FS-152

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-152 was commissioned 28 April 1944, and was in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944, where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned on 19 October 1945.

 

FS-153

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-153 was commissioned 28 April 1944, and reported to the Southwest Pacific area on 26 June 1944 where she operated during the war.  Her commanding officer on 21 October 1944 was LT V. G. Beaudet, USCGR, and by 26 October 1944 she was under the command of LTJG R.F. Horwath, USCGR, and on 1 September 1945 LT Robert B. English Jr., USCGR.  On 31 October 1945, the vessel was transferred from the Coast Guard to the Army Transportation Service and decommissioned on the same day.

 

FS-154

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-154 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on 21 April 1944, with LCDR D.H. Williams, USCGR, as first commanding officer from 21 April 12, 1944.  He was succeeded by LT J.D. Lee, USCGR, and on 19 September 1945, LT W.A. DeVine, USCG, took command.  On 26 June 26, 1944, she reported in the Southwest Pacific area where she continued to operate throughout the war.

 

FS-155

The Coast Guard manned FS-155 was commissioned 10 May 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-156

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-156 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, on 6 May 1944, with LTJG William H. Burgess, USCG, as her commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned at Manila 14 September 1945, and all Coast Guard personnel removed.

 

FS-157

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-157 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on 6 May l944. Her commanding officer was LT Lester B. P. Dale.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-158

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-158 was commissioned 17 May 1944 at Los Angeles, California, with LT Sloan Wilson, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He later became a famous author and his works included The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit.  LT Wallace E. Cooke, USCGR succeeded him on 26 September 1945.  LTJG Robert J. Pate, Jr., USCGR subsequently succeeded him. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-159

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-159 was commissioned on 17 May 1944 at Los Angeles, California, with LT Oliver Pickford, USCG, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  On 2 September 1944, she was turned over to and accepted by the Navy and designated USS FS-159 and attached to the Seventh Fleet Service Force.

 

FS-160

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-160 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on 17 May 1944, with LT W. H. Seeman, Jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer.  LTJG William E. Thirkel, USCGR succeeded him on 7 September 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.

 

FS-161

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-161 was withdrawn from Coast Guard manning on 19 May 1944 and turned over to the Army, the Los Angeles office having cognizance.  Later arriving at San Francisco, she was turned over to the USSR under Lend-Lease.

 

FS-162

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-162 was commissioned April 17, 1944.  Her first commanding officer LT F. Roebuck. He was succeeded by LT K. L. Torrell, USCGR, and on 18 November 1945.  He was succeeded by LTJG Harry F. Rice, Jr., USCGR. LT L. O. Pressey, USCG, later succeeded LT Rice as commanding officer.

On 3 March 1945, at 1635, while proceeding from Outer Bay to Tacloban anchorage, the U. S. Army Tug TP-120 was observed striking a shoal northeast of the red buoy marking the starboard of the channel off San Antonio.  She careened and almost immediately to come about sharply to port and run fast aground approximately 100 yards north of the red buoy.  It was also observed that a man had fallen overboard at the striking of the first shoal.  The FS-162' s launch was immediately cast off and it proceeded to pick up the man overboard and return him to TP-120.  A towing hawser was then broken out and passed to TP-120.  She was pulled free and out into the channel and proceeded thereupon under her own power.

About 2200 on 5 March 1945, cries for help were heard off the small ship's dock in Tacloban.  Three crew members of the FS-162, BM2 James E. Copple; SN1 George W. Varner, and SN2 Robert O.C. Quinney, proceeded to the scene where a small boat with Army personnel had been swamped and sunk.  Life preservers were thrown to those able to swim, and when it was seen that two men were in serious difficulty.  Varner and Quinney unhesitatingly went overboard to their assistance.  Quinney got hold of one man with head injuries and towed him to an Army personnel craft while Varner brought the other man to the launch, where he was hauled aboard unconscious.  Copple at once began resuscitation while Varner took the boat into the dock.  Resuscitation continued until the arrival of the ambulance by which the man began to gasp and had a strong pulse.  The three men together with SN Donald E. Hanhart were recommended for appropriate entries in their service jackets, for their efficiency in effecting the rescues.  She was assigned to and operated in the Central and Southwest Pacific areas during the war.

 

FS-163

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-163 was commissioned 18 April 1944, with LTJG Don K. Townsend, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  He was succeeded by LTJG C. M. Fish, USCG, on 2 September 1945. On 12 October 1945, the FS-163 was lost in a typhoon.

 

FS-164

The Coast Guard-manned Army transport FS-164 was commissioned on 21 April 1944.  She was turned over to W. Ingram, Master, Army Transport Service by LT N. Hanson, Jr. USCG on 10 February 1946.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia, Manus, Lingayen, Tacloban, Tawitawi, etc.

 

FS-165

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-165 was commissioned 26 April 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned 21 September 1945.

 

FS-166

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-166 was commissioned 28 April 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  She was decommissioned 9 October 1945.

 

FS-167

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-167 was commissioned 1 May l944.  LT Pardue Geren, USCGR was her first commanding officer.  LT P.H. Woodward, USCG succeeded him on 24 October 1945.  The ship was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Leyte, Tacloban, Mindoro, etc.

 

FS-168

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-168 was commissioned 4 May 1944.  She had as commanding officers, LTJG Richard W. Jones, USCG, who was succeeded 27 September 1944 by LTJG Joseph A. Kean, USCGR.  She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Mindoro, Tacloban, Zamboanga, etc.  She was decommissioned 2 October 1944.

 

FS-169

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-169 was commissioned 4 May 1944 and assigned to the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned 5 October 1945.

She was under the command of Malcolm Bell, Jr.  Her navigation officer was Ralph Weigel, who was a professional baseball player before and after the war.  Click here for more information.

 

FS-170

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-170 was commissioned 6 May 1944.  She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-171

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-171 was commissioned 10 May, 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG Lawrence O. Bragg, USCGR.  He was succeeded on September 2, 1944, by LTJG Lemuel K. Hartsook, USCGR. In November 1944, she stranded on a reef in Astrolabe Bay between Finschaven and Hollandia, New Guinea, and was pulled off by the Coast Guard-manned LT-636.  She was decommissioned 22 September 1945.

 

FS-172

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-172 was commissioned 19 May 1944.  She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and sunk two miles off Mugil Point on Cape Croisilles, New Guinea.

 

FS-173

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-173 was commissioned 18 May 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG Lester F. Bain, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LTJG Joseph L. Kelly, USCGR.  She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific Area and operated at Leyte, Milne Bay, etc.  She was decommissioned 25 October 1945.

 

FS-174

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-174 was commissioned on 18 May 1944.  She had as commanding officer LT E. R. Sneeringer.  She was turned over to Captain J. J. Feenan, U.S. Army, representing the Army's Transportation Corps on 29 November 1945, after having been assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Manila, Tacloban, Biak, etc.

 

FS-175

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-175 was commissioned 19 May 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-176

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-176 was commissioned 21 May 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Tacloban, Hollandia, etc.

 

FS-177

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-177 was commissioned 26 May 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned 19 August 1945.

 

FS-178

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-178 was commissioned on 27 May 1944.  On 1 August 1945, she had finished discharging a cargo of chemical warfare equipment from Morotai, and was ordered dry-docked in ARD-9, Humboldt Bay, Hollandia, New Guinea, to clean and paint the hull.  She departed drydock on the 3rd and on the 8th was underway for Milne Bay, New Guinea, where she arrived on the 12th and loaded 39 tons of life rafts for Finschaven and Hollandia arriving at the former place on the 14th to discharge 20 rafts and pick up mail and at the latter place on the 18th to unload the remainder before anchoring until the 28th at Challenge Cove, Hollandia.  On that date she received a cargo of mail for Biak and proceeded there independently arriving at Sorido Lagoon on the 30th to discharge mail and load ammunition for Zamboanga, Philippine Islands.  She departed next morning for Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. (The above is believed to furnish a fairly representative cross section of the day-to-day operations of the Coast Guard manned FS's in the Southwest Pacific area).  The FS-178 was decommissioned on 16 October 1945.

 

FS-179

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-179 was commissioned 28 May, 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned on 1 October 1945.

 

FS-180

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-180 was commissioned on 31 May 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned on 18 October 1945.

 

FS-181

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-181 was commissioned 31 August 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LT K.M. Baker, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LTJG L. Treatman, USCGR on 17 September 1945, and he by LT Martin S. Hanson, Jr. USCGR, on 1 November 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Biak.

 

FS-182

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-182 was commissioned 24 June 1944, at New Orleans, LA, with LT R. P. Anderson, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LTJG Robert L. Mobley, USCGR, and he in turn by LT Leon A. Danco, Jr. on 1 October 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia.

 

FS-183

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-183 was commissioned on 22 July 1944, at New Orleans, LA.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG E. W. Owiazda, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 11 October 1945 by LT Clive V. Clark, who in turn was succeeded on 24 October 1945 by LTJG Elliott Rubin, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-184

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-184 was commissioned at New Orleans, LA on 2 August 1944. Her first commanding officer was LT E.G. Berdaw, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LT Juan R. Root, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by LTJG Henry P. Hancock, USCGR, on 12 September l945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

Click here to read an account of her voyages from a former crewman.

 

FS-185

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-185 was commissioned on 21 July l944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, her first commanding officer being LT JG L.C. Rickert, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 20 September 1945, by LTJG L. W. Cotro, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Tacloban.

 

FS-186

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-156 was commissioned 21 July 1944 at New Orleans, LA.  Her first commanding officer was LT F. D. Obrian, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LTJG G. N. Paul, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by LTJG Ernest H. Thompson, Jr.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Biak.

 

FS-187

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-187 was commissioned 31 July 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana, with LTJG W. A. Skelton, Jr. USCGR, first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Manila, Tacloban, etc.

 

FS-188

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-188 was commissioned at New Orleans, LA on 2 August 1944, with LTJG A. R. Freedy, USCGR, her first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, Maijuno, Eniwetok, Guam, Saipan, etc.  On 3 October 1945, the commanding officer was relieved of all responsibilities and accountabilities for the vessel, the Coast Guard crew was replaced by an Army crew.

 

FS-189

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-189 was commissioned at New Orleans, LA on 9 August 1944, with LT B. Spencer, USCG, as commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 26 October 1945, by LTJG William J. Barry, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia, Leyte, Parang, etc.

 

FS-190

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-190 was commissioned 9 August 1944, at New Orleans, LA with LTJG A. Peterson, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  On 1 August 1945, the FS-190 was attached to Service Squadron Nine, Service Force, Seventh Fleet under operational control of CNOB, Leyte, proceeding independently from Mindoro to San Fernando, Luzon with cargo for CNOB, Lingayen Gulf.  She arrived at 1730 and awaited and completed discharge operations from the 2nd through the 4th.  On the 5th she was underway independently for Tacloban, Leyte, carrying two enlisted men (USN) as passengers with no cargo.  She arrived on the 7th and on the 13th got underway independently for Manus Island in the Admiralties, arriving at Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island on the 20th.  Here she took on cargo for the Boat Pool, Naval Shore Facilities, Tacloban and also cargo for USS Oglala and USS Otus.  On the 27th she was also underway for Tacloban, traveling independently and blacked out at night.  The above constituted a good cross section of the activities of the typical Coast Guard-manned FS-type vessel in this area during this period.

 

FS-191

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-191 was commissioned on 12 August 1944, at New Orleans with LTJG E.R. Holden, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She has assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-192

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-192 was commissioned 21 August 1944, at New Orleans, LA with LTJG C. J. Stevenson, USCGR, first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 29 November l944 by LTJG Charles W. Shannon, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-193

The Coast Guard manned Army FS-193 was commissioned at New Orleans on 23 August 23, 1944.  The first commanding officer was LTJG G. W. Hayman, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-194

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-194 was commissioned at New Orleans, on 30 August 1944.  The first commanding officer was LTJG C. J. Hanks, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 9 November 1945, by LT H. S. Squires, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Milne Bay, Segond Channel, Espiritu Santo, etc.

 

FS-195

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-195 was commissioned at New Orleans on 26 August 1944.  Her first commanding officer was Lt. J. P. McNabb, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-196

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-196 was commissioned at New Orleans on 29 August 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG F. B. Davis, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned 22 August 1945.

 

FS-197

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-197 was commissioned at New Orleans on 2 September 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-198

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-198 was commissioned at New Orleans on 5 September 1944, with her first commanding officer being Lt. J. J. Grant, USCGR.  He was succeeded 3 October 1945, by LTJG Charles W. Shannon, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, etc.

 

FS-199

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-199 was commissioned at New Orleans on 18 September 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG L. E. Parsons, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-200

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-200 was commissioned 19 September 1944 at New Orleans, with LTJG F. J. Mahoney, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned 29 October l945.

 

FS-201

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-201 was commissioned on September 30, 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana, with LT R. P. Champney, Jr., USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-202

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-202 was commissioned 7 October 1944 at New Orleans, with LT F. G. Markle, USCG, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LTJG Kenneth D. Killman, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded by LTJG Armand J.P. White on 2 October 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Parang.

 

FS-203

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-203 was commissioned at New Orleans on 17 October 1944, with LTJG F. S. Shine, USCG, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia.  She was decommissioned 31 October l945.

 

FS-222

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-222 was built at Higgins Industries, Inc. and commissioned at New Orleans on 31 January 1945 with LTJG J. A. Sayre, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT J. V. Freeny, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on 25 September l945, by LTJG A. L. Lundberg, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  On 18 January 18, 1946, FS-222 was released from control of Coast Guard, AF WESPAC and transferred to control of Administration Commander, Coast Guard Activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier.

 

FS-223

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-223 was commissioned at New Orleans on 6 February 1945, with LT E. G. Hamilton, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on 8 August 1945, by LTJG J. W. Bingham, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam.  On 10 November 1945, in accordance with verbal orders of the Commander, Coast Guard Manning Detachment and U.S. Army Transportation Corps, Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, Mr. Rio Torres assumed command for the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.

 

FS-224

The Coast Guard Army FS-224 had as her first commanding officer LT V. A. Molstad, USCGR who was succeeded on 1 November 1945, LT W. J. Barry, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-225

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-225 was built at Higgins Industries, Inc. and commissioned at New Orleans on 14 February 1945 with LT F. A Maier, USCG, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 2 March 945 by LT G. W. Pruitt, USCG.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-226

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-226 was commissioned 17 February 1945 at New Orleans with it.  V. S. Colomb, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded 28 September 1945 LTJG J. D. Peterson, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific Area.

 

FS-227

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-227 was commissioned on 1 March 1945, at New Orleans with LTJG James C. Hale, Jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.

 

FS-228

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-228 was commissioned 13 March 1945, at New Orleans with LT Budd B. Bornhoft, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.

 

FS-229

She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.

 

FS-230

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-230 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.

 

FS-231

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-231 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.

 

FS-232

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-232 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.

 

FS-233

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-233 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.

 

FS-234

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-234 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.

 

FS-253

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-253 was commissioned on 7 May 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LT E. P. Jadro, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 5 October 1945, by LT L. S. Sadler, USCG.  On 8 June 1945, she departed from the 3rd Naval District for the West Coast towing the Army vessel QS-17.  On 21 June 1944, she was reported departing Key West for Panama Canal.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte.  She was decommissioned on 23 October 1945.

 

FS-254

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-251 was commissioned 23 May 1945, with LT Robert A. Copeland, Jr. USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded 9 December 1945 by Boatswain Peter Butler, USCG. On 21 June 1944, she departed 3rd Naval District for the Southwest Pacific.  On 7 December 1945, she was turned over with all equipment, stores, etc. to U. S. 6th Army at Nagoya, Japan, Captain J. J. Freeman, U. S. Army signing the receipt for the Army.

 

FS-255

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-255 was commissioned at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY on 6 June 1944, with LT Ludwig Ehlers, USCG as commanding officer.  On 3 August 1944 he was succeeded by LT Robert F. Maloney, USCGR. On 10 May 1945, the FS-255 had proceeded to Taloma Bay with the Davao Gulf First Re-Supply Echelon with a cargo of 155-mm ammunition on board, for the use of the 24th Division, U.S. Army in their operations against the enemy.  On the night of 10-11 May 1945, she was anchored in 17 fathoms of water, 1000 yards, 140 degrees from the pier at the head of Taloma Bay, Davao Gulf, Mindanao, Philippines. Both #1 and #2 hatches were open and about 80 tons of ammunition were still on board.  The ship was dark and the quartermaster on watch was on the bridge and the security watch on #2 hatch, the engineer on watch in the engine room.  It was rainy and the weather was thick when at 0030 on 11 May 1945 she was struck by a torpedo on her port quarter in the after crew's compartment.  The commanding officer, LT George A. Tardif, USCG, was in his berth at the time, but immediately went on deck with a battle light to ascertain the cause of the explosion and extent of damage.  He found that the torpedo had hit her on the port quarter, ordered all hands checked and a search for injured men.  Three injured men were found -SC3 Frank Ness, YN1 Edward P. ConIiffe, and NM1 William Brown.  The commanding officer went inside the ship and looked down into the engine room.  The engineer on watch was already on deck.  The main engines were nearly flooded and water was pouring into the engine rooms from the bulkhead aft which was badly ruptured.  The officer's wardroom, galley and mess ball aft were literally torn to pieces and it was impossible to proceed further forward or aft.  On the boat deck the lifeboat had its stern blown off and blasted out of the cradle and the gig had the s tern blown open and the propeller and shaft bent double, was blown out of the cradle and hanging over the side by the forward falls.  The 140 mm gun had been blown off and one ready ammunition box belonging to it was found on the forecastle head near the anchor winch, with 140 mm shells about forward of #1 hatch.  The ship had buckled between #2 hatch and the bridge structure with foot high ridges in the deck plating, extending down the sides of the ship into the water.  Examination of the crews quarters indicated that MoMM 2/c Lewis Cohen and Steward Theodore R. Strong who were sleeping in the crew's quarters aft were nowhere to be seen.  MoMM 1/c Robert Swett and SC 1/c Richard E. Hoetger who were sleeping in hammocks on the fantail beneath the 140 mm gun platform were also not found.  Large masses of blood were seen on the deck which had been blown to a 90 degree angle.  The signalman on LCI-21 was signaled that the FS-255 had been hit.  The ship was settling fast and two life rafts were launched and men ordered to board them which ware ordered to stand off clear of the ship.  Three minutes later the FS-255 turned over on her port side and sank at 0050. The LCI-21 picked up all survivors ten minutes later.  Out of a total enlisted complement of 20, 16 survived.  All four officers also survived.

 

FS-256

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-256 was commissioned at New York, NY, on 16 June 1944 with LT C. E. Thorsen, USCGR as her first commanding officer.  On 17 July 1944 she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. LTJG K. F. Erickson, USCGR succeeded Thorsen on 3 October 1945.  The ship was decommissioned 14 October 1945.

 

FS-257

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-257 was commissioned 24 June 1944 at New York, NY with LT G. P. Hammond, USCG, as her first commander.  He was succeeded by LTJG S. N. Harstook, USCGR, ahd he in turn by LTJG William F. Moffatt, USCG, on 9 June 1945.  

On 26 July 1944 she departed the Third Naval District for the Southwest Pacific area.  She operated in the Southwest Pacific, including Leyte.  

 

FS-258

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-256 departed the 3rd Naval District on 20 August 1944, for Los Angeles, CA.  She was towing the QS-54.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  She was decommissioned 22 October 1945.

 

FS-259

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-259 departed the 3rd Naval District for Los Angeles, CA on 20 August 1944, towing the QS-57.  She was assigned to and operated in Hawaii.

 

FS-260

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-260 was commissioned at New York on 26 July l944, with LT A. Smalley, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LTJG L. F. Jones, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by LTJG William L, Barlow, USCG on 14 October 1945.  On 26 August 1944 she departed from the 3rd Naval District and on 5 September 1944, was reported towing the QS-16 to the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-261

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-261 was commissioned at New York on 2 August 1944, with LTJG L. W. Conover, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  On 9 September 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-262

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-262 was commissioned at New York on 9 August 1944 with LTJG B. Hribar, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  On 22 September 1944 she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-263

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-263 was commissioned at New York on 16 August 1944 LTJG W. G. Hill, USCGR, was her first commanding officer.  On 6 September 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  On 1 August 1945, the FS-263 anchored in Serida Lagoon, Biak, New Guinea, without cargo awaiting orders to proceed to the Philippine area, and departed on the 2nd for Finschhafen, New Guinea.  Arriving on the 6th, after an uneventful voyage, she loaded mail and commissary supplies for Oro Bay, New Guinea and Milne Bay, New Guinea.  On the 7th she entered drydock at Finschhafen, where she remained until the 9th having her bottom scraped and repainted.  On the 11th she departed Finschhafen to search for a man lost overboard on the 10th, but returned to port when the man was located on Scarlet Beach having swum ashore during the night.  On the 15th she departed Finschhafen for Oro Bay, New Guinea, and moored there on the 16th.  Here the #3 cylinder liner of her starboard engine was found to be cracked and it was deemed inadvisable to proceed to sea with only one engine.  She was, therefore, docked at Oro Bay for the remainder of August 1945 with cargo for Oro Bay discharged but cargo for Milne Bay still on board.  While the engine was being repaired, the crew was engaged in routine cleaning and upkeep work aboard the vessel.  On 12 October 1945, the Coast Guard crew was removed from the FS-263 and she was decommissioned.

 

FS-264

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-264 was commissioned at New York on 24 August 1944, with LTJG E. F. Warner, USCGR, first commanding officer.  On 27 September 1944 she departed New York towing P-751 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Leyte, Manila, etc.  She was decommissioned on 24 September 1945.

 

FS-265

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-265 was commissioned at New York on 1 September 1944, with LT H. E. Dennis, USCGR, her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 22 October 1944, by LTJG Richard E. Youngren, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on 12 November 12, 1945, by LT Walter R. Young, USCGR. On 18 September 1944, she departed New York for Davisville, RI from where she returned to New York on 11 October 1944.  She later departed on 22 October 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  On 5 April 1945, while on course, a floating horned mine was sighted dead ahead in position 05 43' S, 147 09' E drifting across a heavily traveled shipping lane through which an aircraft carrier had been seen to pass not more than half an hour before.  The FS-265 maneuvered into a position from which it was possible to explode the mine with machine gun fire.  The damage to the FS-265 from the exploding mine was slight, consisting of a few jammed doors and locks, short circuits in the radio transmitter and a leak in the hydraulic rudder angle indicator.  All of this damage was subsequently repaired.

 

FS-266

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-266 was commissioned at New York on 8 September 1944.  Her only commanding officer was LTJG J. D. Legon, USCGR.  On October 2, 19144 she departed New York after a trip to Daviaville, RI, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.  On 25 November 1945, the Coast Guard crew was relieved by a civilian officer and crew.

 

FS-267

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-267 was commissioned at New York on 18 September 1944, her first commanding officer being Lt. E. W. Stachle, USCGR.  After a trip to Davisville, RI she departed New York on 10 October 1944, for the Southwest Pacific.  During July 1945 she was transferred to the Navy Department in the Pacific area.

 

FS-268

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-268 was commissioned at New York on 22 September 1944.  Her commanding officer was LT Johannes Larsen, USCGR.  On 22 October 1944 she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war at Parang and elsewhere.

 

FS-269

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-269 was commissioned at New York on 2 October 1944.  LT Jacob Bursey, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She departed New York for the Southwest Pacific area on 22 October 1944.  She operated during the war at Palawan, Philippines.

 

FS-270

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-270 was commissioned at New York on 6 October 1944, with LTJG O. T. Fretz, Jr. as her commanding officer.  She departed New York, 26 October 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed 10 October 1945.

 

FS-271

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-271 was commissioned at New York, 13 October 1944.  Her first commanding officer was Lt. Pettus Kaufman, USCGR.  He was succeeded 26 April 1945 by LTJG N. S. Hobart, USCGR.  She departed New York on 2 November 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned 27 September 1945.

 

FS-272

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-272 was commissioned at New York on 22 October 1944, with LT E. Ayers, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 15 November 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang, Philippines.

 

FS-273

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-273 was commissioned at New York, 6 November 1944 with LT William Paul Clark, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by Lt. Edward L. Ayers, USCGR in September, 1945.  LT Ayers was succeeded by LTJG Louis B. Adair, USCGR who was succeeded by LT Juan E. Lacson, USCGR.

FS-273 departed New York 3 December 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned 30 October 1945.

 

FS-274

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-274 was commissioned at New York, 31 October l945, and LT R. S. Crampton, USCGR, became her first commanding officer on 24 November 1944.  He was succeeded on 4 October 1945 by LTJG G. B. Dowley, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific during the war.

 

FS-275

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-275 was commissioned at New York on 6 November 1944.  LT H. L. Sutcliffe, USCGR, became her first commanding officer.  She departed New York on 3 December 1944, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.

 

FS-276

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-276 was commissioned at New York, 13 November 1944 and LT Antonio N.S. Santa Cruz became her first commanding officer on 5 December 1944, as she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-277

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-277 was commissioned at New York on 20 November 1944, with LTJG F. A. Grantham, USCG, as her first commanding officer.  She departed New York on 14 December 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  LT Matthew L. Stansell, USCG, succeeded Grantham as commander on 1 December 1945.

 

FS-278

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-278 was commissioned at New York on 25 November 1944 with LTJG Beverly L. Higgins, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 25 June 1945 by LT D. W. Engle, USCGR.  She departed New York on 17 December 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated at Peleliu, Palawan, etc. during the war.  From 28 August until 20 September she transported General Douglas MacArthur's defense planning staff for the Philippine Islands.  She was decommissioned 3 October 1945.

 

FS-279

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-279 was commissioned at New York on 2 December 1944, with LTJG George W. Litchfield, USCGR as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 30 December 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned 22 October 1945.

 

FS-280

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-280 was commissioned on 9 December 1944 at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY with LTJG Davis, USCG, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT John A. Waldron, USCGR, on 8 October 1945.  She departed New York on 2 January 1945, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.

Shortly after 2200 on 10 July 1945, the sky at Zamboanga, Philippines was illuminated by a column of flame that climbed 200 feet in the air.  The entire fuel dock appeared ablaze.  All hands on the FS-280 mere awaiting the explosion of the two large tankers known to be moored there.  LT Waldron, commanding officer of the FS-280, assembled a fire and rescue party consisting of himself and five Coast Guard enlisted man and proceeded to the scene, two miles away in the motor launch.  As they approached, the fire seemed to be slackening in intensity and they were able to distinguish the source of the blaze, which were dolphins to which the inboard tanker USS Stonewall (IX-185) was secured.  Flaming oil filled the area between the dolphins and the fire encompassed a total area of 300 square feet with 2 or 3 small fires on the decks of the two tankers 200 feet from the outboard tanker, M. V. China, a native vinta was observed aflame 75 feet of f the bow of the Stonewall. The flames were 3 feet high and appeared to arise from three distinct sources of fuel within the vinta.  The Coast Guardsmen proceeded down the seaward side of the China and observed a lifeboat overcrowded with an excited Chinese crew.  Going alongside they quieted the Chinese and directed them to follow them to the fuel dock.  Swinging under the stern of the Stonewall they observed that four hoses were hooked up on the port side aft and fire fighters aboard the Stonewall were directing three streams at a surface oil fire, 50 feet long, blazing under the counter and along the port quarter.  The other hose was cooling the mid-ship sides, dock, and dolphins that it could reach.  The launch headed in and attempted to douse the flames by splashing water with floorboards ripped from the launch, but the blaze spread and they ware forced back.  A hose was requested and lowered and the flames under the port quarter were extinguished within five minutes.  Flames still leaped from a forward dolphin just beyond reach of the ship's hose and the Coast Guardsmen requested another hose and easing under the dock that drenched the only remaining dolphin afire.  Approaching within 20 feet with a third length of hose their solid stream made short work of the blaze. Going aboard the Stonewall, after the hull and remaining dolphins had been drenched to cool them off, it was learned that an accidental discharge of five barrels of aviation gasoline had been set afire by sparks from a native boat.  Only the courageous action of the fire fighters on board the two tankers had prevented them from being blown "galley west."  It had been touch and go with hundreds of gallons of gasoline within 50 feet of the last flame to be extinguished.  The five Coast Guardsmen who worked with LT Waldrop for an hour to save the two tankers acted in the best traditions of the Coast Guard and were recommended for recognition. They were:

Paul T. Doyle
Lawrence Bendoski
Philip C. Hayes
Robert A. Mulford
Isadore Weinstein

 

FS-282

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-282 was commissioned at New York on 27 December 1944, with LT E. C. Sturgis, USCGR as first commanding officer.  On 19 October 1945 LTJG Joshua W. Reed, USCG succeeded him. She departed New York on 17 January 1945, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-283

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-283 was commissioned at New York on 2 January 1945 with LTJG A. H. Coane, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 29 January 1945, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang, Jacquinat Bay, etc.  She was decommissioned 25 September 1945.

 

FS-284

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-284 was commissioned at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY on 12 January 1945, with LTJG Byron G. Crawford, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.  She was decommissioned 22 August 1945.

 

FS-285

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-285 was commissioned on 22 January 1945 at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY with LTJG Gordon E. Miniclier, USCG, as first commanding officer.  She departed New York on 19 February 1945 for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.  LTJG Carl A. Haldenwanger, USCG succeeded LTJG Miniclier on 22 September 1945.  He, in turn, was succeeded by BMC U. L. Needles on 26 November 1945.

 

FS-286

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-286 was commissioned with her first commanding officer as LTJG William J. Nolan, USCGR, who was succeeded on 27 September 1945, by LTJG Bruce B. Davidson, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, at Milne Bay, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned 1 October 1945.

 

FS-287

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-287 was commissioned 1 March 1945, at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY with LT Walter A. Devine, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area at Tinian and elsewhere during the war.  She was decommissioned 23 August 1945.

 

FS-288

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-288 was commissioned 10 March 1945 at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, NY with LTJG Paul A. Berg, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area at Saipan, Guam, etc., during the war.

 

FS-289

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-289 was assigned to and operated in Hawaii during the war.

 

FS-290

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-290 was assigned and operated under the Central Pacific Base Command.   She was lost in a typhoon at Okinawa on 9 November 1945.

 

FS-309

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-309 was commissioned at New York on 10 April 1944 with LTJG Richard H. Greenless, USCGR, as first commanding officer. LT Oliver Rahle succeeded him.  Departing New York early in May 1944, the FS-309 proceeded to Los Angeles, via Panama Canal.  En route to Honolulu from Los Angeles the FS-309 was in a collision with a Navy destroyer 150 miles off the coast.  With her starboard side caved in and number two hold full of water, but with no one injured, the crew shifted the cargo to the port side and rigged a collision mat, taking her to Los Angeles under her own power.  The damage was repaired, the skipper exonerated by a Navy Board and the FS-309 proceeded to New Guinea, via Honolulu and Ellice Islands.  At Milne Bay, New Guinea she unloaded and reloaded for Hollandia and joined a convoy for the Philippines.

As she approached Leyte the crew was notified that "enemy air attack can be expected at any time," but they sailed up Leyte Bay without firing a shot.  A few days later, however, on Christmas Eve, 1944, the airfield at Tacloban was attacked and she began shooting at enemy planes along with shore batteries.

Sailing shortly afterward for Mindoro, the FS-309 was subject to concentrated attacks from enemy kamikazes while steaming through the Surigao Straits, the Mindanao Sea, the Sulu Sea and the Mindoro Straits on 28 December 1944.  The convoy shot down some 26 enemy planes.  The FS-309's guns fired into one Zero, putting her ablaze shortly before she banked into the ammunition-laden USS Porcupine (IX-120) 200 yards ahead.  A  terrific explosion followed, the concussion picking everybody several feet off the deck of the FS-309 and tearing the flying bridge to pieces with all shatter proof windows which were not down being completely pulverized.  As the smoke rose from the Porcupine, the remnants of the ill-fated ship were seen falling from the sky into the sea as shrapnel littered the deck, with booms, life rafts, hatches, etc. of the ill-starred ship dropping not 20 feet ahead of the FS-309.  Out of the smoky area, three huge, mountainous waves were seen approaching and two men were seen frantically waving and shouting in the water.  The FS-309 maneuvered closer and Francis L. Owens, USCGR, of the FS-309's crew jumped overboard. He carried lines to them and they were rescued.  The two men turned out not to be from the Porcupine, but from a Navy vessel in the column to the left of the FS-309. They had been blown overboard in the Porcupine explosion.  The enemy had scored three hits.  The Porcupine had entirely disappeared except for a floating body and two others were seen abandoned and burning in the distance.  Attacks continued while anchored off Mindoro Island and the FS-309 went to the aid of a burning gasoline tanker hit by suicide divers and rescued her crew.  On 31 January 1945, the FS-309 pulled into the partially wrecked Wawa River Wharf at Nasugbu Bay where the last 300 defenders of Bataan and Corregidor had been landed and held prisoner for many days, many of them dying for want of medical care.  Here enemy "Q" boats--small fast speedboats carrying two depth charges aft and attacking shipping at anchor with suicidal intent were known to be operating.  The FS-309 was the first United States vessel to remain overnight.  A raft extending out from the ship was accordingly built to provide additional protection.  Five days later, the expected "Q" boat attack came.  Shortly after 1 AM, a watch sighted three helmeted Japanese in a motorboat.  He gave the alarm and the searchlight was turned on them.  Not 50 yards away they became confused and ran into the raft near the fantail.  The explosion that followed blew the Japanese and the "Q" boat into the air and lifted the stern of the FS-309 out of the water.  So great was the explosion that a lifeboat on the FS-309's boat deck was completely filled with sand and water. Crewmembers just starting for their battle stations were thrown violently on deck while water poured into their quarters through weather doors and passageways. The men thought an enemy aerial bomb had hit the ship.  No one was hurt and the ship was comparatively undamaged thanks to the protective raft.  The bodies of a Japanese captain and lieutenant were found, indicating the importance of the mission.  If they had succeeded the dock would have been rendered useless for some time.

On 19 August 1945, the FS-309 was at Manila when the Japanese delegation arrived by air to receive General MacArthur's peace terms.  Later she proceeded to Japan as part of the occupation force.  Then on return to the United States she was decommissioned.

 

FS-310

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-310 was commissioned on 11 April 1944 at Camden, NJ with LTJG Orville E. Cummings, USCGR, as commanding officer.  Departing the Delaware River on the same day, she arrived at New York on 18 April 1944 and on 8 June 1944 she departed New York, towing the QS-8, headed for the West Coast.  Her final destination was the Southwest Pacific.  Here she operated during the war at Leyte and elsewhere.

 

FS-311

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-311 was commissioned on 13 June 1944 at Mathis Shipyard, Camden, NJ with LTJG Kenneth P. Howard, USCGR, as commanding officer.  On 17 July 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-312

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-312 was commissioned 27 June 1944 at New York with LT E. L, Jennsen, USCGR, as commanding officer.  On 20 August 1944, she departed New York for Los Angeles, towing the QS-22.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war at Batangas, Philippines and elsewhere.  She was decommissioned 15 October 1945.

 

FS-313

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-313 was commissioned 2 July 1944 with LTJG J. F. W. Anderson, USCGR, as commanding officer.  On 20 August 1944 she departed New York for Los Angeles towing QS-53.  On 27 October 1944 she was withdrawn from her Hawaii assignment and her Coast Guard personnel detached at Los Angeles.

 

FS-314

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-314 was commissioned at Mathis Shipyard in Camden, New Jersey on 22 July 1944 with LTJG W. I. Mittendorf, USCGR, as commanding officer.  On 4 September 1944 she departed New York.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific during the war at Leyte end elsewhere.

 

FS-315

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-315 was commissioned at New York on 31 July 1944, with LT D. B. Oaksmith, USCGR, as commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LTJG S. N. Megos, USCG. She departed New York on September 9, l944.  During August l945 she was engaged in transportation service in the Philippine cruising some 1,788 miles with 343 tons of cargo hauled and 21 passengers.

 

FS-316

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-316 was commissioned at New York on 12 September 1944 with LTJG J. B. Funk, Jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 7 November 1944 by LT M.S. Hanson, Jr., USCG.  She departed New York in October 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

 

FS-317

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-317 was commissioned 25 September 1944 at Mathis Shipyard, Camden, NJ with LT C. B. Christiansson as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LTJG T. B. Barron, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on 14 November 1945 by LTJG J. V. Harrison, USCG.  She departed New York on 22 October 1944 for the Southwest Pacific area where she operated during the war.

 

FS-318

The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-318 was commissioned on 6 October 1944 at Camden, NJ with LT R. S. Graves, USCGR as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 29 September l945 by LTJG Richard S. True, USCGR.  She departed New York on 21 November 1944 for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.  She was decommissioned on 14 October 1945.

 

FS-319

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-319 was commissioned at New York on 27 October 1944, with LTJG Sterling M. Anderson, USCG, as her first commanding officer.  She departed New York on 11 December 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated at Finschhafen, Auguson, etc., during the war.

 

FS-343

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-343 was used for Army training.  She was decommissioned on 21 September 1945.

 

FS-344

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-344 was commissioned at New Orleans on 7 April 1945.  Her first commanding officer was LT J. R. Choate, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 12 September 1945, by LTJG Marvin B. Barker, USCGR. She was used for training civilians for the Army.

 

FS-345

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-345 was commissioned at Kewaunee, WI on 26 July 1944 with LTJG G. W. Oberst, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area and at Guam.  Her first monthly diary was submitted for July and August 1945, the vessel, on 1 July 1945, being anchored in Manila Harbor where she had proceeded two weeks previously to effect an overhaul of her main engines and generators.  She was still anchored there 31 August 1945.

 

FS-346

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-346 was commissioned at Kewaunee, WI on 23 August 1944 with LTJG F. J. Bell, USCGR, as commending officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned 30 August 1945.

 

FS-347

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-347 was commissioned at Kewaunee, WI on 30 September 1944, with LT F. N. Blake, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.

 

FS-348

The Coast Guard maimed Army FS-348 was commissioned at Kewaunee, WI on 8 November 1944 with LTJG M. R. Cook, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.  She was decommissioned on 28 September 1945.

 

FS-349

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-314 was commissioned on 16 May 1944 at New York with LTJG F. H. James, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 18 September 1945 by LTJG F. A. Ziemba, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on 19 November 1945, by LT B. T. Bassford, USCGR.  She departed New York on 21 June 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

On 29 December 1944, while the FS-349 was participating in "U plus15, L-13" resupply of the Mindoro force, in the Philippines, the convoy was attacked at 0815 by several enemy aircraft.  It was a single-engine plane, similar to an enemy "HAP," and approached the convoy from the port side.  The port twin .50. caliber machine guns opened fire.  The plane's apparent objective was to crash dive into the USS Porcupine (IX-126) 700 yards on the FS-349's starboard beam.  Tracer projectiles from the FS-349's machine guns were observed entering the fuselage of the plane about the cockpit.  The plane crashed about 300 yards off the FS-349's starboard bow at 0819 without inflicting damage to the convoy.  Later at 2130 on the same day the convoy was attacked by an undetermined number of enemy aircraft and one of these was destroyed as a result of gunfire from the FS-349.

**For another account of this action see FS-309.

 

FS-350

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-350 was commissioned at New York on 5 July 1944 with Lt. R. J. Hoenschel, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 8 August 1944 for Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Tacloban and elsewhere.  She was decommissioned 25 September 1945.

 

FS-351

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-351 was commissioned 12 September 1944 at the J. K. Welding Company, Yonkers, NY with LTJG Frederick Sturges, III, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 12 October 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Hollandia and elsewhere.

 

FS-352

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-352 was commissioned at New York on 9 August 1944, with LTJG E. B. Drinkwater, USCG, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 10 September 1944, towing QS-19 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.  On 28 November 1945, she was turned over to the U.S. 6th Army at Nagoya, Japan.

 

FS-353

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-353 was commissioned at New York, 5 October 1944, with LTJG Robert H. Foster, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York, 23 October 1944 for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war at Hollandia and elsewhere.

 

FS-354

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-354 was commissioned at New York, 10 November 1944, with LT Ranger Rogers, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 22 September 1945 by ENS Frank C. Anderson, USCG who in turn was succeeded by LT George B. Schwartz, USCGR, on 26 November 1945.  She departed on 5 December 1944 from New York for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.

 

FS-355

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-355 was commissioned at New York on 5 December 1944 with LT R. W. Coe, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She departed New York on 22 January 1945 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Zamboanga and elsewhere. She was decommissioned 19 November 1945.

 

FS-356

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-356 was commissioned at New York on 11 January 1945 with LT R. V. Flouton, USCGR, as her commanding officer.  She operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned 30 October 1945.

 

FS-361

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-361 was commissioned on 10 April 1944 with LT C.C. Gerber, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area. She was decommissioned 26 October 1945.

 

FS-362

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-362 was commissioned 10 April 1944.   She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific area during the war.  Her Coast Guard crew was removed and she was decommissioned 10 October 1945.

 

FS-363

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-363 was commissioned 20 May 1944 at Sturgeon Bay, WI with LT R. A. McCaffery, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, Mindoro, Parang, etc., during the war.

 

FS-364

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-364 was commissioned 14 April 1944.   She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, during the war.

 

FS-365

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-365 was commissioned 12 April 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LCDR Benjamin Ayesa, USCGR.  He was succeeded on 21 August 1945, by LTJG Richard H. Greenless, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.

 

FS-366

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-366 was built at Sturgeon Bay, WI and after being floated down the Mississippi was commissioned at New Orleans on 20 April 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG Howard V. Reckhow, USCGR.  Departing New Orleans on 25 May 1944, she reached Long Beach, CA on 23 June 1944, via Guantanamo, Cuba, and the Panama Canal.  She sailed for Oro Bay, New Guinea on 13 July 1944, via Hawaii, Ellice Islands, New Hebrides, and Guadalcanal arriving at Milne Bay, New Guinea en route on 21 August 1944.  Two months spent traveling up and down the New Guinea coast brought her to such places as Finschhafen, Hollandia, and Biak.  At Biak she was under fire from Japanese bombers who attacked a nearby airstrip, but she was not allowed to fire on them.  On 7 November 1944 she left Hollandia, in convoy, for San Pedro Bay and Tacloban, Leyte, Philippines, where she arrived under constant day and night air raids.  The crew spent half the time at general quarters.  On 24 November 1944 a large-scale attack by 80 Japanese planes, 30 of them broke through the combat air patrol to bomb and strafe the air strips and shipping in the harbor.  A 20-mm shell hit her deck spraying shrapnel among her 50-calibre machine gun crews, wounding the gunnery officer and five enlisted men, none seriously.  All were awarded the Purple Heart. The gun crews claimed hits, but no definite "kill" could be established because of the numerous other vessels that were firing at the enemy planes during the action.

Loaded with steel strips to be used for landing mats on airstrips, the FS-366 left Leyte on 9 January 1945 en route to the Lingayen Gulf beachhead.  As the weather cleared en route and detection by the enemy became easier as they approached the Southwest coast of Mindoro, a Kamikaze hurled up against the side of a liberty ship alongside the FS-366.  The liberty ship was holed amidships just above the waterline and great clouds of smoke poured forth.  She managed to keep going, however, and eventually made port. Constant enemy attacks at irregular intervals followed on the route to Lingayen Gulf, which was finally reached 13 January 1945 (D+4).  The FS-366 remained anchored in Lingayen Gulf on emergency standby, on guard each night for suicide swimmers with bombs on their backs and Q boats.

Proceeding to Nasugbu, south of the entrance to Manila Bay, a beachhead established by the 11th Airborne Division who were pushing inland toward the city of Manila, they returned to Subic Bay for cargo for Batangas in Southern Luzon, where our troops were still fighting.  They were with the first cargo ships to dock there and were warmly greeted by the natives.  The sane was true of Lemery and Taul where they stopped en route.  On 31 March 1945, the FS-366 entered Manila Bay where sporadic fighting was still in progress.  The city was in sad shape, the Japanese having destroyed the waterfront and docks and downtown section, where its stately modern buildings were almost completely reduced to rubble.  Proceeding soon to Cavite, they took a cargo of ammunition to Batangas, returning to Manila on 15 April 1945.  Toward the end of April they took another load of ammunition to the town of Legaspi on the eastern coast of Luzon and for the next few months hauled ammunition between Lingayen, Subic Bay, Manila, Batangas and Legaspi.  Late in May 1945 the FS-366 entered a floating drydock near Guinan for a long needed overhaul and paint job.  In July 1945 she carried a cargo of high-octane gas to Abulug, near Aparri, where our airborne troops had landed.  Thence, she proceeded to Damortis in Lingayen Gulf for another load of ammunition for Aparri . After several more runs to Aparri, San Fernando, Subic Bay, Manila, the FS-366 proceeded to Mindanao.  On her return to Manila her Coast Guard crew was taken off and she was decommissioned on 22 September 1945.  A Philippine crew relieved the Coast Guard men.

"Journal of LTJG Charles Mashburn" who commanded USS FS-366 throughout its voyages in the Pacific during World War II. 

FS-367

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-367 was commissioned April 29, 1944, with LTJG R.H. Greenless, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She reached her final destination in the Philippines on 30 December 1944. In Operation L-3, near San Jose, Mindoro Island, Philippines, she anchored 500 yards off Bulong Point midway between Blue and White beaches.  The USS Mariposa, Navy X-126, Liberty-type, converted oil tanker, dropped anchor about 300 yards away and some 800 yards from shore.  At 1530 Japanese planes, in a sudden and devastating attack of shipping in the harbor sunk or damaged 24 ships.  One crashed the USS Arturus, a PT-boat tender, which sank almost immediately.  A second made a low level strafing and bombing attack on a group of LSTs unloading at White Beach blowing the stern off one of them and than turned on the Mariposa, into which it crash dived.  The tanker immediately burst into flames and a number of the crew either were blown or jumped into the water.  The FS- 367 went to her assistance. At the same time a third Japanese plane made a low-level attack on the destroyers outside the harbor, straddling two destroyers with bombs and finally crashing into the USS Ganesvoort, which immediately began to burn and settle in the water, being assisted by two other destroyers, in a sinking condition.  Proceeding to assist the Mariposa, the FS-367 took several men aboard with her boarding net and James D. Ellis sighting a man struggling in the water and calling for help, dove into the water and supported him until both were picked up by an LSM.  The FS-367 stayed alongside the Mariposa until all survivors had been taken off.  About 1900 the FS-367 withdrew out of the line of fire of guns that were about to shell the Mariposa.  Later, this was cancelled and the Ganesvoort launched 2 torpedoes into her. Immediately thereafter a great amount of burning gasoline spread over the bay making the FS-367's anchorage unsafe.  As she was preparing to move, the Ganesvoort requested she come alongside and take off her crew.  By the time she had reached the destroyer, however, the gasoline had spread so widely that the Ganesvoort was in immediate danger of being engulfed.  The FS-367, instead of stopping to take off personnel, warped alongside the destroyer and began towing her to a safe anchorage.  While so occupied another alert sounded and a Japanese plane was shot down immediately overhead.  The FS-367 finally got the Ganesvoort to safety several hundred yards off White Beach.  The next day the Ganesvoort was abandoned by her crew in a sinking condition.  No casualties ware suffered by the FS-367.  She was decommissioned 24 September 1945.

 

FS-371

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-371 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, WI on August 1, 1944, with LT H. E. Melton, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, Mindoro, Pearl Harbor, etc., during the war.

 

FS-372

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-372 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, WI on 22 August 1944, with LT W. H. Bowden, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war including Leyte, Lingayen, etc.

 

FS-373

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-373 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, WI on 5 October 1944, with LTJG J. L. Barron, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 11 October 11, 1944, by LTJG W. H. Bosworth, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas.  This included Tacloban, San Fernando, etc.

 

FS-374

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-374 was commissioned on 5 October 1944.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas, including Tacloban, Batangas, Gaang Point, etc. during the war.

 

FS-383

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-383 was commissioned at Decatur, AL on 24 September 1944, with LTJG G. P. Kretzschman, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT H .A. Mister. He was succeeded by LT W. L. Stansell, USCGR, on 31 October 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Funafuti during the war.

 

FS-384

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-384 was commissioned 24 September 1944 at Decatur, AL with LT R. L. Young, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas, including Biak, during the war.  She was decommissioned 28 September 1945.

 

FS-385

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-385 was commissioned at Decatur, AL On 23 October 1944 with LT Peter Marcoux, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area during the war.

 

FS-386

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-386 was commissioned at Decatur, AL on 4 December 1944, with Lt. F. S. McVeigh, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.

 

FS-387

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-387 was commissioned 23 May 1944 at Los Angeles with LT J. L. Gray, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.

 

FS-388

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-388 was commissioned 2 June 1944 at Los Angeles.  Her first commanding officer was LT Homer H. Freed, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LTJG J. E. Emmett, USCGR, who was succeeded in turn by LTJG R. I. Cox, USCGR, on 23 April 1945, and by LTJG O. D. Springer, USCGR, on 24 November 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, etc. during the war.

 

FS-389

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-389 was commissioned 28 June 1944 at Los Angeles, CA.  LT C. N. Brown, USCGR, was her first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.

 

FS-390

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-390 was commissioned at Los Angeles, CA on 14 July 1944 with LT G. E. Oliver, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 28 September 1945 by LTJG John L. Murchison, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Manila, Batangas, etc.  She was decommissioned 15 October 1945.

 

FS-391

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-391 was commissioned at Los Angeles, CA on 28 July 1944 with LTJG Ted C. Larsen, USCGR, assuming command, relieving LT Thomas A. Buddy, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LTJG Henry P. Mistrey, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on 10 October 10, 1945, by LTJG George W. Litchfield, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-392

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-392 was commissioned at Los Angeles, CA on 8 August 1944, with LT J. A. Small, USCG, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT Philip G. Adams, USCGR. He was succeeded by LT E. R. Holden, USCGR, on 15 October 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  She was decommissioned 19 October 1945.

 

FS-393

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-393 was commissioned at Los Angeles, CA on 27 August 1944 with LT R. H. H. Nichols, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Hollandia, Manila, etc.

 

FS-394

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-394 was commissioned at Decatur, AL on 14 December 1944.  Her first commanding officer was LT H.J. Whitmore, USCGR.  He was succeeded by LT Henry J. Sandlasse, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by LTJG Kenneth R. Keeler on 12 September 1945.  LTJG C. F. Mashburn, USCGR became commanding officer on 29 September 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area.

 

FS-395

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-395 was commissioned at Ingalls Shipyard, Decatur, AL on 1 January 1945.  Her first commanding officer was LT J. R. Baylis, USCGR, who was succeeded on 14 September 1945, by LTJG B. G. Crawford, USCGR.  He in turn, was succeeded on 1 October 1945 by LTJG Melvin A. Alvey, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area.

 

FS-396

The Coast Guard manned Amy FS-396 was commissioned at Decatur, AL on 18 January 1945.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG E. H. Bowler, USCGR, who was succeeded on 29 October 1945, by LT R. H. Johnson, USCGR.  She was assigned, to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She departed Manila 28 January 1946, for duty in the Marshall Islands, having been transferred from Coast Guard AF WESPAC to Administration Commander, Coast Guard Activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier on18 January 1946.

 

FS-397

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-397 was commissioned at Decatur, AL on 20 February 1945.  Her first commanding officer was LTJG E. Roswell, USCG, who was succeeded on 9 September 1945, by LTJG Arthur N. Froedman, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  On 14 February 1946, as the FS-397 was departing Manila for the Phoenix Group, it had been recommended she be ordered to Honolulu for refrigerator repairs and it was so directed.  She departed Manila on 6 February 1946, for Pearl Harbor, via Okinawa to conduct a survey of LORAN equipment and to salvage if possible, the equipment abandoned by Unit 211 when it departed Okinawa.  On 1 February 1946 she was assigned to the Phoenix LORAN Group and assigned to DOGO, 114th ND, for operational and administrative control.  On the same date she was released from control Coast Guard AF WESPAC and transferred to Administrative Commander, Coast Guard Activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier.  She departed Okinawa February 28, 1946, for Guam, expecting to arrive 6 March 1946.  She departed Guam on 16 March 1946, expecting to arrive at Eniwetok on 20 March for fuel and water en route to Honolulu. She departed Eniwetok on 27 March 1946, for Honolulu, expecting to arrive on 5 April 1946.

 

FS-398

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-398 was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area.

 

FS-399

Commissioning of the Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-399 took place on 1 January 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area at Noumea, Guadalcanal, Wake, etc.

 

FS-400

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-404 was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area including Noumea, Guadalcanal, Wake, etc.

 

FS-404

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-404 was commissioned at San Francisco, CA on 24 October 1944. LTJG R. S. Hall, USCGR, was her commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  She was decommissioned 31 October 1945.

 

FS-405

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-405 was commissioned at San Francisco, CA on 23 November 23 1944, with ENS F. D. Statts, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 12 September 1945, by LTJG David Mitter, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-406

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-406 was commissioned at San Francisco, CA 30 December 1944, with LT E. F. Chandler, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Biak, etc.

On July 1, 19145, the FS-406 was in the Northeast Sulu Sea bound for Iloilo, Panay Island from Cebu, Philippines. She moored at Muala Pier, Panay Island at 1215 on that day loading 35 tons of empty oil drums for shipment to Tacloban, and departing the same date, anchoring off Maripipi Island for the night and proceeding through Junanbatas Channel, the FS-257, ahead of her, ran aground.  The FS-406 stood by and rendered assistance towing her off the beach at 1200 and then proceeding to Tacloban Harbor.  On the 5th she stood out of Tacloban Harbor for White Beach, Leyte Island and after unloading her cargo by barge returned to Tacloban.  On the 14th having loaded 325 tons of miscellaneous cargo she left Tacloban bound for Batangas, anchoring on the night of the 15th on the lea of BilhirIn Island and arriving at Batangas on the 17th. On the 22nd with a return load she left Batangas for Manila arriving at anchorage on the 23rd and docking on the 25th.  On the 31st she was loading 300 tons of miscellaneous cargo for Puerta Princessa, Palawan Island. During July, 1945, she steamed 703.8 miles, making a total of 17,535.3 miles steamed since her commissioning.

On 16 September 1945, while anchored at Hagushi, Okinawa with the steering assembly disabled by a typhoon on 11 September 1945, while en route from Tacloban to Hagushi, a report of another typhoon which would pass close to the east of Okinawa was received.  At 1300 on the 16th T.C. 95.5.2 cleared the harbor to weather the typhoon at sea, but small ships such as FS-, LT-, and several Navy tankers and Liberty ships remained at anchor an the harbor.  By 1100 on the 16th the wind had reached 25 knots coming from NE and the barometer read 29.148.  Sea watches were set and anchor chain veered to 100 fathoms in 15 fathoms of water 1 mile off shore.  The engines were started and kept warm until she got underway, at 0410 on 17 September 1945.  A jury steering gear was set up.  By 1900 on the 16th the wind had reached 70 knots from the NE and the barometer read 28.87.  The ship was rolling 15 degrees, but the anchor did not appear to be dragging.  By 2200 the wind had shifted and was coming from the NW at 70 knots while the barometer read 28.52.  By 0200 on the 17th the wind had again shifted to WNW with velocity at 70 knots, there being no protection from land with the wind from that direction.  The ship was rolling and pitching and the anchor dragged slightly.  By 0300 on the 17th, the barometer had risen to 28.81. At 0410 in a deep pitch of the ship the stern came down on a reef and the ship immediately got underway at flank speed, the stern hitting the reef again at 0413 and the anchor windlass being unable to take in the chain because of the heavy strain on it.  The anchor chain, being welded in a pad-eye in the chain locker could not be slipped and they proceeded dragging the port anchor and maneuvering among ships anchored in the harbor with the use of engines.  At 0600 she dropped back on her anchor about 1.5 miles off shore with both engines slow ahead.  The wind and sea were still from the WNW with wind velocity at 70 knots, but the barometer had risen to 29.06.  The ship was pitching heavily and rolling more than 40 degrees.  At 0730, having taken in the port anchor, she proceeded WNW heading into the wind, a difficult operation with the jury rig steering, necessitating constant use of the engine for steering.  At 0900 a visual message was sent to Navy tug #28 to stand by for assistance, the jury rig being inefficient for steering and there being heavy vibration from a bent propeller blade.  At 1100 on the 17th the wind had decreased to 40 knots from the WNW and the barometer had risen to 29.40.  She had proceeded pitching and rolling to Naha Harbor with Navy tug #28 standing by.  She entered Naha Harbor at 1300 as wind decreased to 30 knots and barometer rose to 29.44.  On the 18th an examination of hatches showed only a slight shift cargo in No. 1 hold, consisting of 90 tons of engineering supplies, but due to a shift in No. 2 hold the ship had a port list of 2 or 3 degrees, which could not be taken off with the starboard fuel and water tanks topped.

On 8 October 1945, while anchored in Naha, Okinawa, with the steering assembly still disabled and port propeller damaged from previous typhoons, a report was received that a typhoon would pass close to Okinawa.  All hatches ware secured and the chain veered to 60 fathoms port and 30 fathoms starboard.  By 0800 on 9 October 1945, the wind had reached 25 knots and the barometer read 29.02. By 1300 the wind was 80 knots and the barometer 28.64.  At 1355 the anchor was noticed to be dragging and at 1400 preparations were made to get underway to take the strain off the anchor chain.  Due to high wind velocity and inefficiency of bent propeller she was unable to make headway and prevent dragging the anchor using flank speed on both engines.  At 1410, with her anchors still dragging, the ship was bearing down on a coral reef when it struck at 1425.  By 1515 the generators were out of operation due to lack of water pressure and at 1700 the wind had reached 150 knots with the barometer reading 28.70, the ship being high on the coral reef.  The water had risen to a depth of 2 feet above the deck plates in the engine room from holes in the hull.  By 10 October the water was over the main engines and generators in the engine room, the lazarette was flooded to within 12 inches of the weather deck and there was two feet of water in the after crew's quarters coming from fittings leading to the lazarette.  The vessel was eventually given up as lost.

 

FS-407

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-407 was commissioned at San Francisco, CA on 16 January 1945, with LTJG J.B. Rowell, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.

 

FS-408

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-408 was commissioned at Stockton, CA on 13 February 1945, with LTJG F. Roebuck, USCG, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated to the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Zamboanga, San Fernando, Tacloban, etc.  On 9 November 1945, LT Roebuck was relieved by Captain Carl C. Elliott, WTDTC.

 

FS-409

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-409 was commissioned 20 February 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean and Western Pacific area including Tinian, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.

 

FS-410

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-410 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.  She was lost in a typhoon at Okinawa on 9 November 1945.

 

FS-411

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-411 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area, Western Pacific area and Middle Pacific area, including Hawaii, Saipan, TInian, Guam, etc.

 

FS-524

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-524 was commissioned on 1 July 1944 with LTJG K. B. Kell, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  The Coast Guard crew was removed as she was decommissioned on 11 October 1945.

 

FS-525

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-525 was commissioned on 16 August 1944 with LTJG George C. Steinemann, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific, and Western Pacific areas, including Milne Bay, Hollandia, etc.

 

FS-526

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-526 was commissioned at New Orleans, LA on 6 September 1944 with LT Francis M. Holbrook, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Mindoro, etc.  She was turned over to the Philippine government after the war.

 

FS-527

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-527 was commissioned at Chicago, IL on 14 October 1944, with LT Gil K. Phares, USCGR, as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  On 1 August 1945, she was moored at Tacloban, Leyte loading food and ordnance supplies for the Army Base at Agusun, Macjalar Bay, Mindanao for which she departed next day, arriving on the 3rd. Unloading, begun on the 4th, was completed on the 7th and she departed Macajalar Bay on the 9th returning to Tacloban on the 10th.  On the 26th she began loading supplies for the Army Base at Cebir City, Cebu, for which she departed on the 28th, anchoring there on the 30th.  Such a month's routine was typical of the activity of the FS vessels in this area.

 

FS-528

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-528 was commissioned at Chicago, IL on 15 November 1944, with LT W. E. Ehrman, USCG, as first commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.  On 25 November 1945 Captain Bjorn Krogaeth assumed command of FS-528 as her Coast Guard crew was removed.

 

FS-529

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-529 was commissioned at Chicago, IL on 28 December 1944, with LTJG J. W. Harrison, USCG as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Funaafuti, Langemak, etc. She was decommissioned 25 September 1945.

 

FS-546

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-546 was commissioned at Los Angeles, CA on 27 September 1944 with LTJG C.A. Brown, USCGR, as her first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT Charles L. King, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded in October 1945 by LTJG Richard Herpers, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, etc.

 

FS-547

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-547 was commissioned 14 October 1944 at Los Angeles, CA with LT E. M. Harrison, USCGR as commanding officer.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  On 11 April 1945, the FS-547 was sent from Manila to San Jose, Mindoro, being loaned out by USASOS for an indefinite period. Her duties were to deliver rations, fuel and equipment to units of the Philippine Army, formerly guerrillas, located at various ports in the Visayan area, to ports administered by the P.C.A.U #7, to transport Philippine Army troops from time to time and make any and all incidental trips which the 8th Army saw fit to set up.  They ran one main monthly supply trip about the second week of each month that required about a week or ten days, to which three to five extra trips were added, all of shorter duration. The usual itinerary was from Margarin Bay (port of San Jose, Mindoro) to Romblon, Romblon Island, to Balanacan (Port of Boac, Marinduque, Island) to Calapan (Capital of Mindoro Province) to Lubang, Lubang Island and back to Mangarin Bay.  Two to four days were spent at their base port, ordinarily to perform ship maintenance and repair as well as to procure ship's rations and supplies.  She was decommissioned 27 October 1945.

 

FS-548

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-548 was commissioned 2 November 1944 with LTJG N. R. Samuelson, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded on 11 September 1945 by LTJG James E. Warren, USCGR.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Leyte, etc.

 

FS-549

The Coast Guard-manned Army FS-549 was commissioned 29 November 1944 at Los Angeles, CA with LTJG A. B. Freedy, USCGR, as first commanding officer.  He was succeeded by LT Thomas D. Miller, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by LT Israel Trestman, USCGR, on 16 November 1945.  She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.  On 2 July 1945, the FS-549 fouled a line in her propeller in Taloma Bay, Mindanao while assisting the FS-550 that had grounded and was unable to pull herself clear.  She was pulled off by the LT-636, Coast Guard-manned. No serious damage resulted.  On 24 November 1945, Master Manuel de Sequera assumed command as her Coast Guard crew was removed.

 

FS-550

The Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-550 was commissioned 21 December 1944 at Los Angeles, CA with LT J. F. Anderson, USCGR, as commanding officer.   She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. During a sudden squall on 2 July 1945 in Taloma Bay, Mindanao, the FS-550 dragged her anchor and went aground.  The FS-549 in an effort to assist her fouled her propeller and was unable to pull herself clear.  The LT-636, Coast Guard-manned, anchored off FS-549, then secured to the dock and clear of the bottom, and towed her to safe anchorage; then anchored off the FS-550 and pulled her clear to a safe anchorage.  No serious damage resulted. She was decommissioned 24 September 1945.


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