Coast Guard History

Frequently Asked Questions



Art Coulter

Defenseman Art Coulter played nearly 500 NHL games for the Chicago Black Hawks and New York Rangers during an exemplary career. An athlete of exceptional strength and endurance, he was fiercely devoted to the concept of teamwork.

The native of Winnipeg, Manitoba began making a name for himself in his hometown with the senior Pilgrims. He gained two and a half years of professional experience with the Philadelphia Arrows of the Can-Am League. He excelled at both ends of the ice and demonstrated a willingness to mix it up with the opposition by leading the league in penalty minutes in 1930-31.

After playing the last 13 games of the regular season and two playoff matches for Chicago in 1931-32, Coulter became a regular the next year. His physical play and ability to handle the puck made Coulter a perfect defense partner for burly Taffy Abel. The solid duo played a key role on the Hawks' inaugural Stanley Cup win in 1934.

Coulter was placed on the NHL second all-star team in 1935 but found himself traded to the Rangers for Earl Seibert midway through the next season. His solid defensive play and competitive zeal pleased the New York management and fans. Prior to the 1937-38 season, Coulter succeeded Bill Cook as captain and was selected to the second all-star team three straight years beginning in 1938. In 1939 he took part in the Babe Siebert Memorial Game and the next year he helped the Blueshirts win their third Stanley Cup. Coulter set a career high with 19 points the following season and was one of the most popular players on Manhattan.

The veteran defender joined the Canadian Armed Forces during World War II and spent two seasons with the Coast Guard Cutters when they played out of the Eastern League. Coulter was one of the top attractions in the league and was placed on the first all-star team in 1943. He was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1974.


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Last Modified 10/10/2012