U.S. Coast Guard Awards


Coast Guard Medal
Award Citations, N-Q


NASH, William G., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  18 May 1989
Date of Award:  06 March 1991

Petty Officer NASH is cited for heroism on 18 May 1989 while in charge of a Coast Guard contingent which coordinated and conducted rescue efforts in the community of New Caney, Texas.  As coxswain of a 12-foot Coast Guard utility boat assigned to Marine Safety Office Houston, Petty Officer NASH was directly responsible for the evacuation of 120 people from the flooded neighborhoods in an area where the water rose to more than eight feet above its normal level.  His efforts included removing residents from rooftops, portaging boats and equipment across the flooded, snake-infested waters on the interstate highways, and successfully coordinating relief and logistics efforts.  While picking up two individuals for evacuation, one of the passengers suddenly changed position, causing the utility boat to become swamped by the rushing flood waters and dumping all four occupants into the water. One person was physically incapacitated and struggled to remain afloat. In doing so, he inadvertently removed his lifejacket, placing himself in imminent danger of drowning.  Petty Officer NASH, in a determined effort to save the victim, battled the fast-moving current and dragged him to a nearby tree to await rescue.  The current was so strong that both were nearly swept away.  They clung to the trunk of the tree to avoid being swept further into the woods by the current. For nearly 30 minutes, they huddled together to maintain body heat until another boat could be launched to rescue them.  Petty Officer NASH demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


NELSON, Michael Bruce, Yeoman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  03 June 1972
Date of Award: 
19 December 1972

Petty Officer NELSON is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 3 June 1972 while on authorized liberty from Coast Guard Station Coos Bay, when he rescued a 12-year old girl from drowning in the turbulent surf at Bastendorf Beach, Charleston, Oregon. The girl and a friend were among a group of Girl Scouts on an outing at the beach and were both swept out to sea as they were wading and playing on a rubber air mattress. One girl managed to hold her position until bystanders from the beach threw her a rope and pulled her to safety. The other girl, meanwhile, was drifting further away from shore. Petty Officer NELSON, advised that a person was in the surf, immediately proceeded to the scene and sighted the girl approximately 100 yards offshore treading water and having great difficulty staying afloat in the breaking six to eight-foot surf. Without hesitation, he plunged into the cold water and swam through continuous rows of breakers using all the strength he could muster to reach the girl. After placing her on his back and securing her arms about his neck, to keep her from being torn away by violent action of the battering surf, Petty Officer NELSON continued fighting his way through the merciless breakers in an attempt to reach calmer water outside the surf line. Although becoming weaker with each breaker, he continued his efforts until arrival of a Coast Guard rescue boat. After being pulled to safety, Petty Officer NELSON, though weak, cold, and very tired, assisted in treating the young girl for shock while enroute to shore. Petty Officer NELSON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue mission. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Carignan, James L.  A Gold Lifesaving Medal was posthumously awarded to Betty R. Manock, a civilian, for her role in this rescue)


NELSON, Thomas Everett, Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  07 September 1963
Date of Award:  30 July 1964

For heroism, on September 7, 1963, while serving as crewman aboard the CG-44305, engaged in rescuing a woman who was trapped in the hull of an overturned cabin cruiser near Humboldt Bay, California. NELSON, aboard the CG-44305, proceeded to the scene about 350 yards offshore in the vicinity of twenty foot breakers. Two crewmen from the CG-36515 were already in the water attempting to dive under the cruiser to rescue the victim, who could be heard screaming and pounding on the hull. NELSON immediately dived into the water and attempted to enter the cabin cruiser. After several unsuccessful attempts, a line was secured to the capsized vessel and a strain was taken on it by the crew of the CG-36515. This temporarily righted the vessel. NELSON and another crewman quickly removed the woman before the vessel again capsized. Aboard the lifeboat, the unconscious woman was administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. She soon regained consciousness and was removed to a hospital. NELSON demonstrated fortitude, initiative, and daring in spite of ever-present personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Gates, Lester K., Hoffman, William R., and Walters, James P.)


NEILSEN, William A., Quartermaster Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  19 January 1968
Date of Award:  03 June 1968

Citation not on file.  

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: (Griffith, Richard J.; Hill, Robert E.; Jones, Milton M.; Sheeley, Clyde S.)


NIEMAN, Richard W., Electronics Technician Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  19-20 April 1997
Date of Award:   06 August 1997

Petty Officer NIEMAN is cited for extraordinary heroism while serving as crewman of Boat 314, Disaster Response Unit 1, Commander, Coast Guard Forces St. Louis, from 19 to 20 April 1997. During this period, Disaster Response Unit 1 was dispatched to Grand Forks, North Dakota to assist in the evacuation of people stranded due to flooding. On 19 April at 1400, Boat 314 began evacuating homes and buildings in the area. Two hours later, Boat 314 approached an apartment building on fire in the central business district. Concerned that people were trapped inside, Petty Officer NIEMAN, disregarding his own safety, jumped from the boat to the fire escape and conducted a search of the dark, burning building. Petty Officer NIEMAN conducted door-to-door searches of the adjacent apartment buildings, evacuating people to fire escapes for pick up by Boat 314. During one particularly hazardous evacuation, Petty Officer NIEMAN faced difficulty in gaining building access. Rather than abandon his effort, Petty Officer NIEMAN once again disregarded his own safety by entering the swift, frigid waters to force open the partially submerged door to the building. Upon entry, Petty Officer NIEMAN located six elderly people in desperate need of assistance. After escorting four people to Boat 314, Petty Officer NIEMAN carried the two remaining people through the turbulent, debris-choked waters to the boat. As his search continued, the fire spread, engulfing the central business district. Petty Officer NIEMAN continued searching as debris and burning embers rained down, singing his hair and melting his survival suit. Upon securing the search at 0200 on 20 April, Petty Officer NIEMAN had searched dark, burning, and flooded buildings for 12 hours, saving the lives of 195 people. Petty Officer NIEMAN’s dedication and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Note: BM2 James A. Leach, USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” for his role in this series of rescues)


NOLTE, William J., Aviation Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  10 November 2002
Date of Award: 
30 April 2003

Citation not on file.


NORSTOG, Jon Thorvald, Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  24 March 1968
Date of Award: 
05 November 1968

For heroism on the afternoon of March 24, 1968 while serving on board the USCGC BARATARIA (WHEC 381) and engaged in fighting a fire aboard ship in Unimak Pass, Alaska. Petty Officer NORSTOG attempted to slow an abnormally smoking ship’s service generator in order to prevent further damage and to adjust the governor speed control. Despite his prompt action, the generator burst into flames. Although aware that remaining near the blazing machinery was extremely hazardous, Petty Officer NORSTOG remained and activated a nearby extinguishing system to fight the fire. During this operation a low order explosion occurred which inflicted serious burns to his head, arms and hands. Petty Officer NORSTOG, caught in the dense smoke, which limited his vision and made breathing very difficult, persevered and was successful in stopping the main engine. He was subsequently assisted from his precarious position by a shipmate. Petty Officer NORSTOG demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger and materially contributed to averting a major conflagration aboard ship. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


OBEDIN, Harry Elis, Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  16-17 April 1962
Date of Award:  26 July 1962

For heroic conduct on April 16-17, 1962, while serving as Executive Officer of the USCGC TRAVIS (WSC-153), engaged in fighting a fire on board the Italian Motor Vessel ANDREA GRITTI, at Port Everglades, Florida. The TRAVIS, which was moored in Port Everglades at the time, was called upon to render assistance to the Captain of the Port, Miami, and to the local civilian fire-fighting organizations when the ANDREA GRITTI entered the port with a cotton and resin fire smoldering in No. 3 Hold. Shortly after his arrival at the scene, Lieutenant OBEDIN, then a Lieutenant (junior grade), found the fire had penetrated to the engine room. Further, the large quantities of water used in fighting the fire were causing the ship to take a heavy list to starboard, throwing the crew members into a state of panic and greatly hampering fire fighting and salvage operations. He organized and directed crew members of the TRAVIS in containing and combating the engine room fires by use of foam, and his personnel succeeded in extinguishing the fire and keeping re-flashes under control for approximately 14 hours. Lieutenant OBEDIN also supervised cutting a hole in the side of the ship to assist in dewatering the holds, and he led a team of men in removing a manhole on a fuel settling tank in which the fuel was boiling. He then used portable CO2 extinguisher to cool the boiling fuel. Lieutenant OBEDIN demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of ever-present personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


O’KEEFE, William, Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966

For heroic conduct on April 8, 1966, while serving on board the USCGC COOK INLET (WHEC 384), when he boarded the burning and abandoned Norwegian passenger vessel VIKING PRINCESS  to search for 40 missing survivors. When advised of the disaster, the COOK INLET departed Guantanamo Bay to assist the Norwegian ship, afire in the vicinity of Windward Passage. Upon arrival, finding the ship burning violently and apparently abandoned, O’KEEFE promptly volunteered as a member of a boarding party to search the vessel for survivors. Despite dense smoke and heat so intense that patches of paint on the outside were bursting into flame, he boarded and assisted in searching all accessible spaces above and below decks, including the infirmary areas and crew quarters. The boarding party remained aboard the flaming hulk for more than 20 minutes, executing a vigorous search until ascertaining that there was practically no chance that any living survivor remained aboard the VIKING PRINCESS. Thereafter, when warned that the fire was advancing under them along the lower decks, the boarding party withdrew. O’KEEFE demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Barnes, Robert S., Buechler, Albert C., Davies, Ronald J., Dinsmore, Robertson P., and Johnson, John R.)


OLSEN, Robert Darrell, Electronics Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  11 June 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of June 11, 1967, while serving as a volunteer swimmer from the Coast Guard Loran Station, Hawaii, engaged in the rescue of three survivors from a downed Cessna 172 which had crashed in the ocean approximately 500 yards off Upolu Point, Hawaii. The victims, two men and two women, although injured, had managed to climb out of the plane, which sank immediately in 80 feet of water.  When advised of the ditching and location of the plane, Petty Officer OLSEN and four teammates dived into the choppy, shark-infested waters and swam out to rescue the survivors. When the four occupants of the plane were located, one was unconscious, one was bleeding profusely from a head wound, and two other persons were in apparent shock. The rescuers then began assisting the survivors back to shore where they were treated by Coast Guard personnel. Petty Officer OLSEN demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Akana, Paul H. , Bennett, George G., Crisler, Lynn T., and Pearce, Robert)


ORTIZ, Gavino, Seaman Apprentice, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  4 August 2001
Date of Award:  26 July 2002

Seaman Apprentice ORTIZ is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon 4 August 2001 while rescuing seven swimmers caught in a riptide off the beach of South Padre Island National Seashore, Texas.  He arrived on scene at Beach Access Number 5, to a chaotic scene of local fire-rescue personnel shouting and pointing to five people in the water, 75-100 yards offshore in danger of drowning.  With two Coast Guard small boats unable to reach the group due to sandbars and a six foot breaking surf, he instinctively plunged into the water and swam toward the victims, using their cries for help as his reference to their location.  He recovered a 59 year-old man, placed him on a nearby tourist's inflatable mattress, and then recovered two other individuals nearby who were drowning.  One of the men slipped underwater, overcome by fatigue, forcing Seaman Apprentice ORTIZ to dive beneath the surface to recover him.  He then turned his attention to two other individuals who were drowning 20 yards further out to sea.  Quickly swimming to their location, Seaman ORTIZ dove beneath the surface to recover one of the men and revived the man with a stomach thrust while swimming him to the inflatable mattress.  Swimming to shore with the inflatable mattress and all five victims in tow, Seaman Apprentice ORTIZ then noticed a Cameron County Texas Parks Police officer exhausted and struggling in the surf line.  Pushing the raft through the surf line, he placed the officer amid the group and continued swimming to shore.  He then received a line from shore, attached it to the raft, and all six people were safely hauled onshore.  Although thoroughly fatigued, Seaman Apprentice ORTIZ again returned through the surf line in a 40-yard swim, recovered a fireman caught in a riptide and delivered him to safety.  Seaman Apprentice ORTIZ demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


PADDOCK, Ronald Robert, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  04 July 1966
Date of Award:  20 February 1967

For heroism on the morning of July 4, 1966 while serving on board the CG-52312 when he entered the cabin of a capsized motorboat at the entrance to Yaquina Bay, Newport, Oregon, to rescue a woman. Two men from the overturned craft were quickly rescued by a Coast Guard boat, on inner harbor safety patrol, when it was ascertained that a third person was trapped inside the cabin. The CG-52312, on safety patrol outside the bar, arrived almost immediately. Seaman PADDOCK entered the water and attached a line to the overturned boat enabling the bow to be lifted out of the water. He then removed his life jacket and made his way through a small hatch to reach the woman whose life jacket was caught on a cabin fitting. While attempting to calm the hysterical woman, he freed the life jacket, removed her from the capsized boat, and pulled her to safety. Seaman PADDOCK demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


PEARCE, Robert Edward, Electronics Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  11 June 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of June 11, 1967, while serving as a volunteer swimmer from the Coast Guard Loran Station, Hawaii, engaged in the rescue of three survivors from a downed Cessna 172 which had crashed in the ocean approximately 500 yards off Upolu Point, Hawaii.  The victims, two men and two women, although injured, had managed to climb out of the plane which sank immediately in 80 feet of water. When advised of the ditching and location of the plane, Petty Officer PEARCE and four teammates dived into the choppy, shark-infested waters and swam out to rescue the survivors. When the four occupants of the plane were located, one was unconscious, one was bleeding profusely from a head wound, and two other persons were in apparent shock.  The rescuers then began assisting the survivors back to shore where they were treated by Coast Guard personnel.  Petty Officer PEARCE demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Akana, Paul H., Bennett, George G., Crisler, Lynn T., and Olsen, Robert D.)


PEPE, Andrew J., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  25 April 1982
Date of Award:  ??

Seaman PEPE is cited for extraordinary heroism on the night of 25 April 1982 while serving onboard USCGC MARIPOSA [WLB-397].  The ship was moored at Cleveland, Ohio and Seaman PEPE was making a phone call on the municipal pier when a young man walked by the phone booth and leaped into the frigid waters of Cleveland Harbor.  Seaman PEPE rushed to the edge of the pier and saw the man foundering in the water.  Not able to reach the man and finding nothing to throw to him, Seaman PEPE stopped a passing car and told the driver to call the police.  Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, Seaman PEPE entered the 40 degree water and swam toward the victim. Before Seaman PEPE could reach him, the victim sank under the water.  Seaman PEPE immediately dived, grabbed the man, and pulled him to the surface.  Looking for something to hang onto, Seaman PEPE swam toward some nearby debris.  Although losing his grip on the victim twice due to the onset of hypothermia, Seaman PEPE re-established contact each time and held onto the victim until the arrival of rescue personnel.  The victim was taken to a  nearby hospital and Seaman PEPE was treated for acute hypothermia.  Seaman PEPE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


PEREIRA, Donald D., Boatswain's Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  23 September 1964
Date of Award:  02 November 1964

For heroism, on the evening of September 23, 1964, while serving as Officer in Charge of the CG-40522, engaged in the perilous rescue of a twelve year old boy from the waters of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.  The CG-40522 was dispatched from Castle Hill Station to affect the rescue of the boy, who, as he stood watching the surging surf, had been swept from the rocks by a huge wave caused by Hurricane Gladys.  The boy was unable to reach shore and was treading water to stay afloat.  Upon arrival on the scene, despite darkness, PEREIRA, without hesitation, skillfully maneuvered the CG-40522 into the turbulent surf and approached within fifty feet of the lad.  A life ring was thrown from the boat to the boy.  However, due to his exhausted condition, he was unable to grasp it.  Immediately, upon realizing the boy's plight, PEREIRA directed a crewman to go to his rescue and within seconds the boat crew had the boy and his rescuer aboard the CG-40522.  PEREIRA then maneuvered the boat out into deep water and proceeded to shore where the boy was treated by medical authorities.  PEREIRA demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and great ability in spite of ever present personal danger during the entire rescue operation.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


PESCE, Michael C., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  06 September 1990
Date of Award:  17 January 1991 

Seaman PESCE is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 6 September 1990 when he rescued an injured woman trapped in the Edgewater breakwall at the entrance of Cleveland Harbor near Lake Erie. The woman was one of six persons thrown into the water when their sailboat ran aground and broke apart in a severe storm. Seaman PESCE was dispatched from Coast Guard Station Cleveland, Ohio to serve as rescue boat crewmember and to assist an officer of the Ohio Division of Watercraft in the rescue.  Upon reaching the scene, and after learning of the woman’s peril on the opposite side of the breakwall, Seaman PESCE, without thought or regard for his own safety, volunteered to leave the rescue boat and be placed onto the breakwall to effect the rescue.  Despite 50-knot winds and an 8- to 10-foot surf, and hampered by blinding wind-driven spray and rain, Seaman PESCE inched his way towards the woman in the eerie light of flares, searchlights, and lightning.  Repeatedly battered by the heavy surf, and twice washed from the breakwall, Seaman PESCE worked doggedly to free the woman, whose legs had been wedged into a narrow crevice, which kept her pinned underwater most of the time.  Undaunted when he lost his glasses and safety helmet, Seaman PESCE dove underwater in repeated attempts to free the trapped woman while the sailboat’s boom and rigging were being whipped dangerously back and forth over his head by the force of the waves. Finally, with the assistance of two other rescuers, Seaman PESCE was able to free the woman. Then with great difficulty, the three rescuers placed the injured woman into the rescue boat which rushed her to shore. Seaman PESCE remained behind, clinging precariously to the breakwater while awaiting the arrival of another rescue unit.  Although the rescued woman did not survive the ordeal, Seaman PESCE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Pritchard, Robert R.)


PETTEY, Richard S., Aviation Machinist’s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  23 February 1990
Date of Award:  17 January 1991

Petty Officer PETTEY is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 23 February 1990 when he rescued the driver of a burning oil truck on interstate 10 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Petty Officer PETTEY acted quickly and unhesitatingly, bravely responding to the rescue of the driver who was trapped in an 18-wheel tractor trailer carrying 80,000 gallons of waste oil. Petty Officer PETTEY and his wife were travelling along Interstate 10 when he witnessed the accident involving the fuel truck and four crushed automobiles. Without hesitation, he stopped his vehicle and immediately ran to the scene of the accident where he found the fuel truck and the four other vehicles engulfed in smoke and flames. Upon hearing cries of help from the truck driver, Petty Officer PETTEY approached the truck and attempted to pull the driver, who was pinned in the interior of his vehicle, to safety. As Petty Officer PETTEY and a second truck driver worked unselfishly and without regard for their own personal safety, a small explosion temporarily forced them back. Then, with a renewed sense of urgency, Petty Officer PETTEY returned to free the driver. He was soon overcome by smoke and was forced to retreat momentarily. Meanwhile, the second driver managed to pull the victim halfway through a window of the twisted wreckage before he to was overcome by smoke. Petty Officer PETTEY immediately continued the rescue effort, and had no sooner finished freeing and carrying the driver to safety when the cab of the truck became completely engulfed in flames. Petty Officer PETTEY administered first aid and treated the victim for shock until relieved by paramedics. Without Petty Officer PETTEY’s decisive and immediate actions, the truck driver would have perished. Petty Officer PETTEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


PINER, Billy W., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  28 August 1977
Date of Award:  16 February 1978

Petty Officer PINER is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 28 August 1977 while serving as engineer on board Coast Guard motor lifeboat CG-44350, when he rescued two persons form drowning near Ocean City Inlet, Maryland.  Petty Officer PINER, assigned to Coast Guard Station Ocean City, was participating in a routine patrol when a nearby small boat was swamped by the wake of a passing vessel.  Arriving on scene, the crew of CG-44350 rescued a two-year old child who was passed over by the man on the swamped boat.  Before the man and his wife could be brought safely on board, the small boat capsized throwing them into the water and trapping the woman under the boat.  Petty Officer PINER immediately entered the water, dived under the swamped craft, and brought the woman to the surface. Upon reaching the surface, the man stated that he was entangled in the anchor and fishing lines, was unable to free himself, and could not hold on to the capsized craft much longer.  Petty Officer PINER quickly placed the woman over the bow of the vessel, dived under the boat, and cut the lines from around the man’s legs.  Petty officer PINER then helped the two victims to safety on board the Coast Guard vessel.  Additionally, Petty Officer PINER retrieved the anchor line of the distressed craft and passed it to the crew of the rescue craft so that the capsized boat could be towed to shore.  Petty Officer PINER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


POROO, Jacob Lauri Arthur, Hospital Corpsman First Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  02 June 1968
Date of Award:  10 August 1968

For heroism on the morning of June 2, 1968 when he entered a burning cabin to attempt a rescue on Adak Island, Adak, Alaska.  When fire erupted about 3:30 a.m. engulfing the doorway of the old recreation building, Petty Officer POROO, together with seven other men, successfully escaped.  Hearing shouting and believing it to be a cry for help form a trapped companion, he unhesitatingly re-entered the flaming cabin to render assistance with complete disregard for his own safety.  Petty Officer POROO received second and third degree burns over 75 percent of his body before he finally left the burning building, assured that his companions were safe.  He then calmly gave sound medical advice to his injured companions until help arrived.  Petty Officer POROO later succumbed to his injuries.  His outstanding courage, intrepidity, and unselfish actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


PREI, Ronald Clarence, Fireman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 April 1967
Date of Award:  ??

For heroism on the evening of April 30, 1967 while engaged in searching for two teen-age boys reportedly stranded at the Duluth Entry North Breakwater Light, Minnesota.  Twin 16-year old boys and a brother had been seen running along the jetty challenging the 10 to 15-foot waves when witnesses observed a huge wave sweep one boy into the water.  When two boys were reported stranded at the light, Fireman PREI and two comrades volunteered to attempt the rescue.  Lashing themselves together, the three men proceeded, with hand lanterns as their only illumination, to the end of the breakwater.  Despite the high waves, winds gusting to 40 knots, driving rain, and 36 degree water, the rescue party diligently searched the breakwater and light but found no trace of the boys.  While returning to the beach a 20-foot wave swept the lead man off the jetty nearly causing the loss of all three men.  Fireman PREI’s prompt and efficient action prevented his companion and himself from being dragged over by the wave action.  Although hampered by numerous bruises, Fireman PREI and an injured Coast Guardsman managed to pull their teammate onto the beach where all efforts to revive him failed.  Fireman PREI’s courage, unselfish actions, perseverance and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Callahan, Richard A. and Culbertson, Edgar A.)


PRITCHARD, Robert R., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  06 September 1990
Date of Award:  17 January 1991

Seaman PRITCHARD is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 6 September 1990 when he rescued an injured woman trapped in the Edgewater breakwall at the entrance of Cleveland Harbor near Lake Erie. The woman was on of six persons thrown into the water when their sailboat ran aground and broke apart in a severe storm. Seaman PRITCHARD was serving as a crew member aboard a Coast Guard 41-foot utility boat (CG-41487) attached to Coast Guard Station Cleveland, Ohio. When CG-41487 arrived on scene, the sailboat had just run aground. When a report was received that a woman was wedged in the breakwall, Seaman PRITCHARD, without concern for his personal safety, volunteered to be placed on the breakwater by the crew of an Ohio Division of Watercraft rescue boat. Despite 50-knot winds and an 8- to 10-foot surf, and hampered by blinding wind-driven spray and rain, Seaman PRITCHARD inched his way towards the woman in the eerie light of flares, searchlights, and lightning. Repeatedly battered by the heavy surf, Seaman PRITCHARD worked doggedly to free the woman, whose legs had been wedged into a narrow crevice which kept her pinned underwater most of the time.  He dove underwater in repeated attempts to free the trapped woman while the sailboat’s boom and rigging were being whipped dangerously back and forth over his head by the force of the waves.  Finally, with the assistance of two other rescuers, Seaman PRITCHARD was able to free the woman.  Then with great difficulty, the three rescuers placed the injured woman into the rescue boat which rushed her to another rescue unit.  Later, when he tried to inspect the sailboat’s hull for other victims, Seaman PRITCHARD was washed over the breakwater. Fortunately, he was rescued, and the search was suspended due to increasingly severe weather.  Although the rescued woman did not survive the ordeal, Seaman PRITCHARD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Pesce, Michael C.)


PURSEGLOVE, Neale Patterson, Yeoman First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  03 October 1965
Date of Award:  17 August 1967

Fore heroism on the morning of October 3, 1965 when he rescued a woman and her infant daughter from an overturned burning automobile near Akron, Ohio.  Struck by a passing vehicle, the car was forced down an embankment where it overturned, throwing two occupants clear, and caught fire.  Petty Officer PURSE-GLOVE immediately stopped his automobile, ran to the burning wreck, and pulled a woman passenger to safety.  Then she advised that her one-year old daughter was still inside the burning car.  Petty Officer PURSEGLOVE, without regard for his own personal safety and the danger of a possible explosion, returned to the flaming vehicle, kicked out the back window, crawled inside, and pulled the infant to safety. Soon after the removal of the child, the automobile became completely engulfed inflames.  Petty Officer PURSEGLOVE demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


QUINN, Daryl G., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  05 January 1980
Date of Award:  29 April 1980

Seaman QUINN is cited for extraordinary heroism on 5 January 1980 when he assisted in the rescue of two men from the grounded barge MICHAEL F in the turbulent surf near Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey.  Upon notification of the grounding, Seaman QUINN departed Coast Guard Station New Haven as a crewman on board Coast Guard Motor Life Boat CG-44355 and proceeded to the scene despite heavy surf and a driving snowstorm.  Arriving on scene, the barge was observed engulfed in 20-foot breakers, lying broadside to the surf, approximately 1-mile offshore.  As the coxswain maneuvered CG-44355 closer to the hapless barge, Seaman QUINN braved the heavy surf and blinding snow while moving hand-over-hand along the rail toward the bow of the motor life boat.  Reaching the bow, he tied himself to the rail and waited as the motor life boat was brought alongside MICHEL F.  At that moment the two men who had been trapped in a leaking deckhouse of the 300-foot barge broke out of the deckhouse and waded through waist-deep water to the rail and vaulted over it into Seaman QUINN’s arms.  He then passed them to other Coast Guard personnel on the deck of CG-44355.  Seaman QUINN was then recovered from the rail as the motor life boat proceeded seaward to safety.  Seaman QUINN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Greer, Matthew W., Langstaff, Eric M., Truppa, Chris P., and White, Robert M.)  


 

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