U.S. Coast Guard Awards


Coast Guard Medal
Award Citations, G-J


GAGE, Wayne Gilbert, Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  27 December 1970
Date of Award:  01 March 1971

Senior Chief Petty Officer GAGE is cited for heroism on the morning of 27 December 1970 while serving as Officer-in-Charge, U.S. Coast Guard Siuslaw River Station, engaged in the perilous rescue of three crewmen from the grounded fishing vessel HAROLD J, two miles south of Hecata Head Light Station, Florence, Oregon. Although hampered by hazardous conditions and darkness, Senior Chief Petty Officer GAGE, along with three other Coast Guardsmen, located the HAROLD J. Despite the heavy breakers, Senior Chief Petty Officer GAGE entered the surf and swam to the disabled vessel and made three separate trips to rescue the victims. Senior Chief Petty Officer GAGE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger to save the lives of these men. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


GALVIN, Kevin J., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  13 October 1982
Date of Award:  18 December 1982

Petty Officer GALVIN is cited for heroism on the day of 13 October 1982 while serving as coxswain of Coast Guard Motor Life Boat (MLB) 44315 engaged in a rescue operation at the entrance to the Merrimac River, Newburyport, Massachusetts.  Upon notification that a small boat had capsized mile north of the north jetty with 2 people in the water, the MLB was dispatched. Demonstrating exceptional seamanship, Petty Officer GALVIN guided the MLB across the river bar and headed into the 15-foot breaking seas. Arriving on scene Petty Officer GALVIN maneuvered his vessel as close as possible to people in the water, but due to the breaking seas and close proximity to the jetty, he made the decision to use a swimmer.  With Petty Officer GALVIN’s expert boat handling, he held the vessel into the breaking seas while his crewmen rescued the 2 survivors.  Petty Officer GALVIN’s seamanship, judgment, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Kallelis, John A.)


GATES, Lester K., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  07 September 1963
Date of Award:  ??

Citation not on file. 


GECK, Jack Ernest, Aviation Machinist’s Made Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  27 March 1973
Date of Award:  08 July 1974

Petty Officer GECK is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 27 March 1973 while serving as Sea Air Rotary Wing Evacuation Team (SARWET) aircrewman of Coast Guard HH-52A 1389 helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of two adults from the surf off Ocean Beach, California.  The helicopter, dispatched from Coast Guard Air Station, San Francisco, arrived on scene and observed a 25-foot sailboat capsized on the rocks and two persons foundering in the turbulent surf approximately 1,000 yards offshore.  Four persons had been aboard the boat when it capsized and two of them had managed to swim ashore. The other two survivors, who had been in the water at least 30 minutes, were without any type of personal flotation gear and were being inundated every 10 seconds by the high seas. The eight-foot seas and 30-knot winds precluded the helicopter from making a platform pickup and basket hoist rescue. Realizing that the survivors could not remain afloat in their weakened condition, Petty Officer GECK and a fellow Coast Guardsman volunteered and immediately jumped into the raging 51-degee water to assist the helpless victims. Although  disappearing completely beneath the breaking surf every 8 to 10 seconds, Petty Officer GECK and his companion kept the exhausted survivors afloat while the helicopter made a quick search for other possible survivors. When the helicopter returned, Petty Officer GECK aided the victims into the rescue basket for transportation to the nearest hospital facility. He and his companion were subsequently picked up by another helicopter which had arrived on scene.  Petty Officer GECK demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout this rescue mission.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty were instrumental in saving the lives of the survivors and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Dewey, Charles M.)


GEORES, Eric Godfrey, IV, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  23 September 1964
Date of Award:  22 October 1964

For heroism, on the evening of September 23, 1964, while serving as a crew member of the CG-40522, engaged in the perilous rescue of a twelve year old boy from the waters of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The CG-40522 was dispatched from Castle Hill Station to effect the rescue of the boy, who, as he stood watching the surging surf, had been swept from the rocks by a huge wave caused by Hurricane Gladys. The boy was unable to reach shore and was treading water to stay afloat. Upon arrival on the scene. the CG-40522 was maneuvered into the crashing surf and the boy was immediately located. A life ring was thrown from the boat and landed about a foot away from the boy. However, the exhausted lad was unable to grasp it. GEORES, realizing the boy’s plight, without hesitation, dived into the heavy surf, swam to the victim, and pulled him to the safety of the boat. GEORES demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring, in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


GIBBONS, Mark P. Boatswain's Mate First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Petty Officer GIBBONS is cited for extraordinary heroism on 30 October 1991 while serving as a member of the rescue team on board CGC TAMAROA during the daring rescue of four survivors from an Air National Guard (ANG) helicopter in what became known as "The Perfect Storm." The ANG H-60 was forced to ditch because it could not refuel from a C-180 tanker due to the violent turbulence caused by the worst weather in more than 100 years. When a USCG H-3F helicopter could not hoist the ANG crew because the force of the wind was so strong the basket did not go down to the water, but went almost straight back into the tail rotor, the TAMAROA became their only hope. Petty Officer GIBBONS volunteered to be a member of the rescue team knowing the grim fact that he could lose his own life if he were washed overboard. As the seas towered above the bridge of the TAMAROA and the weather buoys reported waves of 100 feet, the TAMAROA did not have enough power to fight the storm and make a controlled approach to the men in the water. By turning beam to the seas and using their power, the TAMAROA was able to approach the ANG crew, but at the cost of taking 55-degree rolls. The rescue team could not even walk out to the bow; they crawled on their hands and knees. For almost two hours, Petty Officer GIBBONS and the others held their breath, as they were completely submerged in 56-degree water as the waves crashed on deck. With an incredible display of team work, all survivors were snagged in a cargo net and hauled aboard the TAMAROA. If Petty Officer GIBBONS had not risked his life during the worst storm of the century, the survivors of the ANG H-60 would certainly have died. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

Petty Officer Gibbons was also awarded the Air Force Commendation Medal for this rescue.


GOODSPEED, Walter Lee, Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  16 January 1968
Date of Award:  20 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of January 16, 1968 while serving as crew member of the CG-30532 engaged in suppressing a massive gasoline fire in the Houston Ship Channel approximately one and one-half miles southeast of the Baytown-LaPorte vehicular tunnel. The CG-30532 was diverted from a fire at the Shell Oil Refinery to assist in fighting the fires resulting from the collision of the Liberian freighter CHRISTIANE and three gasoline-laden barges in tow of the tug BARBARA WAXLER. Upon arrival on scene, personnel of the CG-30532 assisted in extinguishing the fire on one barge, which was laden with over 17,000 barrels of high octane gasoline, and when re-flash occurred, suppressed it. When it was noted that heavy vapors and gasoline fumes were emanating from a damaged hatch over the hot deck of the barge, Seaman GOODSPEED, with total disregard for his own safety, voluntarily boarded the barge and assisted another Coastguardsman in opening the hatch cover and hauling a fire hose aboard to fill the open compartment with foam in order to reduce the danger of additional re-flash or explosion. This action resulted in the final extinguishing of the fire and in safeguarding the boats and personnel surrounding the barge. Seaman GOODSPEED demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Tanner, John R.)


GOWLER, Carl, Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 28 June 1966
Date of Award:

For heroism on the afternoon of June 28, 1966 while serving as crewman on board the CG 40563, engaged in the perilous rescue of three persons from a capsized boat in the surf off Westport, Washington.  Upon arrival, Petty Officer GOWLER swam over 600 feet to assist the survivors in four to eight foot breaking surf. When he reached the boat, an adult and a small boy were hanging onto the bow of the craft. One boy carried away by the seas was rescued separately. Calmly taking charge, helping and reassuring the father and the son, Petty Officer GOWLER directed the boy, who was weakening, to climb on his shoulders and wrap his arms around him. As a rescue helicopter landed in close proximity to the capsized boat, an extremely large breaker swept the adult survivor and Petty Officer GOWLER away from the craft, causing the boy to be torn away from his rescuer.  Petty Officer GOWLER, nearing the point of exhaustion, quickly retrieved the semiconscious lad and, holding the boy's hands together around his neck, swam to the helicopter which carried them to the safety of the beach.  Petty Officer GOWLER demonstrated initiative, fortitude and courage despite imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


GRAY, Michael D., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  28 January 1980
Date of Award:  29 April 1980 

Seaman Apprentice Gray is cited for heroism on the evening of 28 January 1980 when he attempted to save two of his shipmates following the collision between USCGC BLACKTHORN and SS CAPRICORN in Tampa Bay, Florida. Shortly after the collision, USCGC BLACKTHORN commenced a roll to port and then capsized, thereby precluding a bridge command to prepare for and to execute an orderly abandon ship. During this period, Seaman Apprentice GRAY was on the messdeck with a large number of the USCGC BLACKTHORN crew. As BLACKTHORN reached an inverted position and the messdeck flooded to within a few inches of the deck, Seaman Apprentice Gray saw one of the crewmembers climb though the engine room escape scuttle, located aft on the messdeck, which was now overhead. That crewmember located a flashlight and, shining it back down through scuttle into the darkened messdeck, shouted that he had found a way to escape, causing the remaining survivors to all rush toward the scuttle. Despite the fact that the delay could have cost him his life, Seaman Apprentice Gray, realizing that those men were proceeding into a trap, talked one man into returning to the messdeck and pulled another back. After diving beneath the surface of the nearly flooded messdeck to insure that the starboard door to the buoy deck was still open, he returned to his two shipmates and told them to form a chain with him by holding onto each other's belts, after which they would swim under water though the door to the buoy deck. During the escape, the man holding onto Seaman Apprentice Gray's belt lost his grip. When the two men failed to surface, Seaman Apprentice Gray had to be ordered by his commanding officer not to reenter the vessel as BLACKTHORN was in imminent danger of sinking. Seaman Apprentice Gray demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


GREER, Matthew C., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  5 January 1980
Date of Award:  29 April 1980

Petty Officer GREER is cited for extraordinary heroism on 5 January 1980 when he assisted in the rescue of two men from the grounded barge MICHAEL F in the turbulent surf near Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey. Upon notification of the grounding, Petty Officer GREER departed Coast Guard Station New Haven as coxswain of Coast Guard Motor Life Boat CG-44355 and proceeded to the scene despite heavy surf and a driving snowstorm. Arriving on scene, the barge was observed engulfed in 20-foot breakers, lying broadside to the surf, approximately 1-mile offshore. When he was informed that a desperate helicopter evacuation would be attempted, Petty Officer GREER volunteered to attempt a boat rescue. In the face of the mounting surf, Petty Officer GREER maneuvered CG-44355 to the inshore lee of the barge by tacking in and out of the surf to prevent capsizing in the shallow water. As the two crewmen, trapped in a leaking deckhouse of the 300-foot barge, were in danger of drowning, Petty Officer GREER approached the barge as two of his crewmen lashed themselves to the bow rail of CG-44355. Undaunted by the extreme peril facing him, Petty Officer GREER reached the barge on his second attempt. While he held the motor lifeboat to the side of the barge with full throttles, the trapped crewmen broke out of the deckhouse and waded through the waist-deep water. Upon reaching the barge railing, they vaulted the rail and were caught by the Coast Guard personnel tied to the bow of CG-44355. Petty Officer GREER then reversed the engines to clear the barge before the next wave hit. As the survivors were placed in the cabin of the boat, a wave approaching 25-feet lifted three-quarters of the motor lifeboat from the water and slammed it down. Despite this freak wave and the still turbulent seas, Petty Officer GREER cautiously piloted the boat seaward to safety. Petty Officer CREER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Langstaff, Eric M., Quinn, Daryl G., Truppa, Chris P., and White, Robert M.)


GRIFFITH, Richard John, Engineman Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  19 January 1968
Date of Award: 
??

For heroism on the morning of 19 January 1968 while serving as engineer of the CG-253072, attached to the USCGC ABSECON (WHEC 374), engaged in the perilous rescue of 16 persons from the disabled motor vessel OCEAN SPRINTER in the North Atlantic Ocean. The ABSECON, diverted from Ocean Station Delta to assist, assumed on-scene command and advised the crew of the stricken vessel of the evacuation plan. Due to the severity of the weather, winds over 40 knots, and seas constantly in excess of 20 feet, rescue operations were delayed awaiting daylight. At daybreak, despite heavy seas and freezing temperatures, the CG-253072, manned by volunteers, was dispatched from the ABSECON on three separate trips. Petty Officer GRIFFITH aided in bringing the boat through the heavy seaway to a position alongside the OCEAN SPRINTER from which the crew of the ship could enter the boat from a Jacob’s ladder. On the second and third trips the rescue boat, which was leaking excessively, had to be repaired and dewatered prior to return to the heavily listing ship.  All crewmen of the ship were rescued and evacuated to the ABSECON. Petty Officer GRIFFITH demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Hill, Robert E., Jones, Milton M., and Sheely, Clyde S.)


GRIGSBY, Danny Leon, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  12 September 1971
Date of Award: 
29 December 1971

Seaman GRIGSBY is cited for heroic conduct in the morning of 12 September 1971 while serving as a crewmember aboard CG-44361, engaged in the perilous attempted rescue of seven persons from the waters of Coos Bay Entrance, Charleston, Oregon. The CG-44361 was dispatched from Coos Bay Station to assist in the rescue of survivors from two pleasure craft which had capsized in 10- to 12-foot breaking seas along the Coos Bay South Jetty. As the CG-44361 was maneuvered through the turbulent surf to the scene, Seaman GRIGSBY, dressed in a wet suit, plunged into the 12-foot breaking seas to rescue the victims from the water. After reaching the first victim, and in spite of the severe sea condition, he held the man and successfully returned to the boat. Seaman GRIGSBY continued in his efforts until he had retrieved three victims, the last of whom was swept form his grasp while engulfed in a series of heavy breakers which completely submerged him as he was alongside the CG-44361. Though exhausted, he swam out and recovered the third victim. After returning to the boat, Seaman GRIGSBY later assisted in the recovery of the fourth victim and further assisted other crewmen with the victims while enroute to an awaiting ambulance. Seaman GRIGSBY demonstrated remarkable initiative, fortitude, and great ability in spite of imminent personal danger throughout the entire rescue operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Duke, Angus C., Forster, Mark H., and Rehberg, John C.  Gold Lifesaving Medals were awarded to Alton A. Edlund, Charles G. Mack, and Eston L. White, civilians, for their respective roles in this rescue)


GRIMO, Peter Frank, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  7 May 1960
Date of Award:  16 August 1960 

For heroism during the rescue operations following the shipwreck of the F/V MAUREEN F, while entering Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey on 7 May 1960. GRIMO, who was serving as Officer-in-Charge of the CG-36439 on routine inlet patrol, had positioned his boat near the south jetty, as an ebb tide from Barnegat Bay had precipitated an extremely rough sea condition on the bar. Observing traffic entering the inlet, GRIMO sighted the MAUREEN F as she arrived at the bar, and then suddenly broached and capsized, throwing all eight occupants into the ocean.  He immediately maneuvered the CG-36339 onto the bar; a distance of approximately five hundred yards, and in eight to ten foot breaking seas effected the rescue of four survivors of the disaster.  The four men, suffering from bruises, immersion, and exposure, were brought ashore where all received medical attention.  The CG-36439 then returned to the scene to continue the search for other survivors. GRIMO demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue operation.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.


HABEL, Joseph A. Chief Boatswains Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  25 January 2000
Date of Award:  12 June 2000 

Citation not on file.  Coast Guard Press Release (D-5) Number 114-00 stated:

"Chief Petty Officer Joseph A. Habel will receive the Coast Guard Medal. . .[on] Jan. 25, the Station Cape Charles crew performed a dangerous rescue of the crew of the tug Bay King.  They risked their own lives while exposing themselves to harsh weather conditions that exceeded the Coast Guard limits for a 41-foot UTB.  Waves as high as 18 feet and winds as strong as 70 knots pummeled their boat, in addition to driving snow and ice that created near-zero visibility.  To safely remove the crew from the tug, the boat crews had to recover them from the freezing water and bring them aboard the Coast Guard boat."


HADDOCK, Martin T., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


HARDIN, Eldon Clarence, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1964
Date of Award:  20 May 1965

For heroism, on 30 August 1964, while serving a crew member of the CG-36455, when he unhesitatingly entered the surging surf, with breakers 20- to 30-feet high, to rescue seven survivors of the charter boat BELUGA, which had capsized on Siuslaw River Bar, Florence, Oregon.  When advised of the accident, HARDIN manned the lifeboat and proceeded to the scene where all occupants of the demolished BELUGA were located foundering in the surf, approximately one-half mile from shore.  The CC-36455 was skillfully maneuvered into the immediate vicinity of the survivors and one man was pulled aboard safely. However, when the coxswain of the CG-36455 saw that the boat was endangering the lives of the persons in the surf, HARDIN volunteered to enter the water.  He immediately jumped into the 30-foot breakers and assisted six struggling survivors in their efforts to reach the safety of the shore. HARDIN demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger during this rescue.  His courageous actions most certainly contributed to the saving of the lives of the survivors.  HARDIN’s unselfishness and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Boswell, Richard B. and Filsinger, Gary D.)


HARGRAVE, Henry Marvin, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  05 August 1967
Date of Award:  02 November 1967

For heroism on the morning of 5 August 1967 while serving as coxswain of the CG-36531, engaged in the perilous rescue of three persons from a pleasure craft which capsized on the bar at Nehalem River, Oregon. Maintaining a safety patrol at the mouth of the river, CG-36531 arrived almost immediately at the scene of the capsizing. Petty Officer HARGRAVE skillfully maneuvered the lifeboat close to the north jetty, in extremely shallow water with swells and breakers up to 8 feet for a period of approximately 46 minutes while the only other crewmember swam to the survivors and brought them to the boat. He repeatedly assisted his crewmember by pulling the persons aboard the lifeboat and heaving lines to those in the water. After transporting the survivors to shore, Petty Officer HARGRAVE and his crewman returned to the scene and assisted in retrieving the capsized boat. Petty Officer HARGAVE demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Koplan, Richard M.)


HARSHFIELD, Richard A., Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

First Award

Date of Action:  04 July 1980
Date of Award:  02 February 1981

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Johnson, Robert W., Larue, Joe S., Michael, William R., Smith, Stephen R., and Terrell, Bruce W.)

Second Award

Date of Action:  20 September 1980
Date of Award:  02 February 1981

Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 20 September 1980 while serving as coxswain of surf rescue boat (SRB) 30201. During this period he was engaged in the rescue of personnel from the charter boat NANCY H which had capsized and broken up while attempting to cross the Tillamook Bay bar. Dispatched from Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay, Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD arrived on scene and spotted two persons in the debris-strewn 15-foot seas. Displaying expert seamanship, Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD maneuvered the SRB alongside the victims and assisted his crewman in recovering them from the water. At one point, as the second survivor was entering the SRB, a 20-foot breaker crashed over the boat and onto the stern. With the survivors safely on board, Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD quickly proceeded to safer water and assumed the duties of on-scene-commander. He immediately began directing two motor lifeboats and a Coast Guard helicopter while piloting his own SRB in the turbulent seas. Noting that one of the survivors he had rescued was suffering from shock and exposure, Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD ensured that proper medical treatment was being administered and returned to shore where medical authorities were waiting. Master Chief Petty Officer HARSHFIELD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Wilton, Ronald B.)


HAYWARD, Stanley E., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12 October 1996
Date of Award:  ??

Petty Officer HAYWARD is cited for heroism on 12 October 1996 while serving as crewman aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Utility Boat (UTB) 21550. The crew of UTB 21550 was on harbor safety patrol near the McKellar Lake area of the Mississippi River, Memphis Tennessee Harbor, when they witnessed a vessel capsize.  The seven occupants of the vessel were fishing when the boat was swamped by a 6-foot wave caused by a passing towboat and barge.  The UTB immediately diverted to the capsized vessel and spotted five of the victims clinging to the hull of the vessel, screaming that two small children hadn’t surfaced. Petty Officer HAYWARD immediately entered the water and swam through fuel oil, fishing line, and flotsam to the overturned boat.  He dove under the vessel, fought his way through the debris to the air pocket, and found the two small children.  Freeing the first child from entangling lines and wires, Petty Officer HAWARD brought the young victim to the surface. He immediately dove back under the boat and retrieved the second trapped victim.  Petty Officer HARWARD braved the strong river current and cold murky water and returned to the overturned vessel with a heaving line and life ring to aid the five adult victims, near panic and unable to swim.  Petty Officer HAWARD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(BM3 Robert C. Scott, USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” device for the role he played in this rescue)


HEATON, Tristan P., Aviation Survivalman Second Class, USCG  (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  04 April 1993
Date of Award: 
 

Petty Officer Heaton is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 4 April 1993 while serving as Rescue Swimmer aboard HH-65A helicopter CGNR 6504, engaged in the perilous rescue of a person trapped by pounding surf inside a sea cave at Cape Lookout, Oregon. Arriving on scene, Petty Officer HEATON was lowered to the base of a sheer, 200-foot cliff at the mouth of the cave to assess the situation. Observing a man trapped at the innermost reaches of the cave by 12-foot breakers of a flood tide, Petty Officer Heaton realized that immediate action was required. After briefing the aircraft commander via radio, showing total disregard for his own safety, he entered the boiling surf and swam to the victim. Arriving at the ledge, he calmed the man and told him of the rescue plan. After giving his survival vest to the victim, Petty Officer Heaton coaxed him into the surf for an attempt to swim to the mouth of the cave. Both men were repeatedly dashed against the vertical north wall of the cave, then forced under water by huge rollers. After several minutes, the victim was rendered unconscious, which added to Petty Officer Heaton’s burden. He continued fighting the strong tidal current and, at the pint of exhaustion, reached the helicopter’s rescue basket. Holding both the basket and victim, he was able to put the semiconscious victim inside. Once safely aboard the helicopter, despite debilitating fatigue, he administered aid to the victim enroute to the hospital. Petty Officer Heaton demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


HELMER, George Patrick, Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  29-30 April 1969
Date of Award:  
08 December 1969

Senior Chief Petty Officer HELMER is cited for heroic conduct during the period 29 April to 30 April 1969 while serving as Officer in Charge, USCGC POINT WHITEHORN (WPB 82364) engaged in fire fighting operations for the naphtha-laden tanker MOBILE APEX in Limetree Bay, St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Despite the numerous explosions and raging fires, Senior chief Petty Officer HELMER skillfully maneuvered the POINT WHITEHORN alongside the MOBILE APEX to place an investigation team from USCGC COURAGEOUS (WMEC 622) aboard the burning tanker and remained in this hazardous position until the team was safely removed. Senior Chief Petty Officer HELMER demonstrated unusual initiative, fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout the mission. His unselfish actions, remarkable courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Anderson, Peter J. and Sanders, Charles H.)


HENDERSON, James Hardy, Chief Damage Controlman, USCG

Date of Action:  17 December 1964 
Date of Award:   09 April 1965

For heroic conduct on 17 December 1964, while serving under the Captain of the Port, Chicago, Illinois, when he boarded the flaming, grounded, Barge NDT-103, loaded with aviation gasoline, in the face of constant danger of an explosion, to direct the fire fighting parties. The disaster occurred when the motor vessel CHIEF, with a large tow of barges, collided with the New York Central Railroad Bridge located at Depue, Illinois.  As a result of the collision, gasoline from one of the barges burst into flames setting the barge and the bridge on fire. Local fire fighting equipment was dispatched to the area, but none was equipped to handle a marine fire of this magnitude. HENDERSON, upon arrival on the scene, began directing the crews of two Coast Guard ships which were in the area. He continually exposed himself to danger above and beyond the call of duty, while calmly, steadfastly, and intelligently directing Coast Guard activities in this fire fighting operation. Despite adverse weather conditions, with near zero temperatures, he directed the fire fighting parties so that the fire was brought under control and extinguished. HENDERSON demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HENDERSON, Ronald A., Machinery Technician First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  03 June 1975
Date of Award: 
25 March 1976

Petty Officer HENDERSON is cited for heroism on the evening of 3 June 1975 while on authorized liberty from Coast Guard Organized Reserve Training Center, Miami Beach, Florida, when he rescued a man from a burning apartment at Miami Beach, Florida. Petty Officer HENDERSON, a resident of the apartment complex, was awakened by a commotion and upon arrival at the scene was informed of a fire in an upstairs apartment. After repeated attempts to determine the presence of occupants in the apartment failed due to the general state of confusion among other residents, Petty Officer HENDERSON immediately returned to his apartment to obtain a fire extinguisher and then proceeded directly to the scene of the fire which by now appeared to have completely engulfed the upstairs apartment. The fire extinguisher was expended to no avail. Realizing that time was of the essence, Petty Officer HENDERSON entered the apartment to search for possible occupants but was forced to retreat on three separate occasions due to the intense flames and smoke. Undaunted, Petty Officer HENDERSON proceeded to a rear entrance and was immediately confronted with extremely heavy smoke which made visual investigation nearly impossible. With great determination, he then commenced a search of the apartment with the flames from the raging fire providing the only source of light. Upon entering a rear bedroom, Petty Officer HENDERSOIN located a man, who appeared unconscious, crouched in a far corner. Attempts to remove the man were met with great resistance, as it became apparent that he was heavily intoxicated. Faced with the ever-increasing danger of the rapidly advancing fire, Petty Officer HENDERSON subdued the victim and carried him to safety. Reaching the rear entrance, they were met by another resident who, being a doctor, administered first aid to the victim. Until the arrival of the doctor on scene, Petty Officer HENDERSON acted single-handedly in combating the fire and rescuing the hapless victim. Petty Officer HENDERSON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HENNING, Thomas H., Chief Quartermaster, USCG

Date of Action:  26 July 1997
Date of Award: 
08 October 1997

Chief Petty Officer HENNING is cited for extraordinary heroism in his response to a fireworks explosion on the night of 26 July 1997. During the fireworks display at the Venetian Festival in Charlevoix, Michigan, an explosion occurred, propelling pieces of the launching trailer over a distance of 1200 feet, narrowly missing chief Petty Officer HENNING and his family. The shards of the METAl caused numerous injuries, including one fatality and several amputations. Chief Petty Officer HENNING acted quickly to safeguard his family, then immediately began attending victims. While fireworks continued to ignite, he remained in harm’s way, rendering first aid to two of the most seriously wounded victims. Chief Petty Officer HENNING quickly assisted a double amputee victim by applying a tourniquet to the arm, continuing to attend to the victim until he was relieved by a doctor. Chief Petty Officer HENNING then aided another injured man who was bleeding profusely from a laceration to his side abdominal area. He escorted the injured man to an ambulance where he proceeded to control the bleeding with a dressing and began treating the victim for shock. Chief Petty Officer HENNING stayed with the injured man until emergency medical personnel could take over. He is credited with saving the lives of at least two people. Chief Petty Officer HENNING continued to assist the local authorities by helping with crowd control and cleanup efforts. Instrumental in the fast, efficient reaction to this tragedy, Chief Petty Officer HENNING is to be commended. He unselfishly placed his own life in danger to render lifesaving aid to others. Chief Petty Officer HENNING demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in responding to this tragic accident. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


HICKS, Larry Allen, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  17 August 1969
Date of Award: 
24 December 1969

Petty Officer HICKS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 17 August 1969 while serving as coxswain of the CG-22316, engaged in the perilous rescue of four men from a capsized pleasure craft on the Nehalem River Bar, Wheeler, Oregon. Petty Officer HICKS skillfully maneuvered the CG-22316 into the heavy breaking surf to rescue the men trapped under the capsized boat and those clinging to its sides. After pulling one survivor aboard, he assisted another Coast Guard rescue boat in retrieving another man. Displaying exceptional courage and skill, he maneuvered his vessel to shield the capsized boat form the breaking surf and assisted the Coast Guardsman in the water who was reassuring the trapped men during the perilous passage through the breakers to safety. Petty Officer HICKS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring to save the lives of these four men. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal Citation: Bryan, John M.)


HICKS, Michael W., Aviation Machinist’s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  01 October 1979
Date of Award: 
10 July 1980

Petty Officer HICKS is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 1 October 1979 while serving as the search and rescue aircrewman of Coast Guard HH-52A 1383 engaged in the perilous rescue of 3 persons who were thrown into the surf when their 14-foot boat capsized at Lost Creek Beach near Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Alerted by Coast Guard Air Station North Bend, the helicopter, which was at Newport, Oregon on another mission, quickly scrambled and arrived on scene within minutes. While conducting a search for the survivors, the aircrew received a report from the beach party that 2 of the 3 victims had struggled ashore. Utilizing vectors from the Coast Guard Station Yaquina Bay beach party, the search area was adjusted for current. Shortly thereafter, Petty Officer HICKS spotted the victim floating face-down in the surf. The aircraft commander decided against a water landing due to the 8 to 12-foot breaking surf. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Petty Officer HICKS, already wearing an exposure suit, volunteered to enter the frigid, 48-degree water from the hovering helicopter. After entering the water, he was able to recover the unconscious victim and struggle ashore despite the adverse water conditions. On the beach, with the surf breaking around him, Petty Officer HICKS immediately began administering emergency aid to the victim. When the shore party arrived and placed the victim on a resuscitator, Petty Officer HICKS monitored the victim’s vital signs. As the victim was being prepared for loading into the helicopter, his heart stopped. Petty Officer HICKS immediately commenced cardiopulmonary resuscitation while the victim was loaded into the aircraft and continued the exhausting CPR throughout the trip to the hospital. Upon relief of the patient, Petty Officer HICKS was himself treated for exposure. Petty Officer HICKS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HIGHTOWER, Morgan D., Apprentice Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  19 December 1971
Date of Award:  21 July 1972

Seaman HIGHTOWER is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 19 December 1971 while serving as a crewman aboard small boat Number One of USCGC MINNETONKA (WHEC 67), engaged in the perilous rescue of his shipmate from the waters of the North Pacific Ocean.  When CGC MINNETONKA small boat Number One was returning from boat drills, the coxswain began experiencing trouble with the control linkage and could not effectively control engine speed.  As a crewman was hauling the messenger line aboard, the engine control linkage failed to operate and he was directed to cast off the line.  While out-hauling the sea painter messenger, the crewman's foot became caught in the bight of the line and he was pulled into the ocean beneath the waves by the forward motion of the ship an the weight of the sea painter.  Seaman HIGHTOWER realized his shipmate's peril and, with complete disregard for his own safety, immediately dived into the ocean and reached his shipmate before he had been dragged too far beneath the sea.  When they came to the surface the other crewmen on the small boat cut the line and pulled both men aboard.  During the rescue operation both men were in grave danger of being struck by the small boat's propeller and being injured by the boat which was rolling quite heavily in the wind-swept seas.  Seaman HIGHTOWER demonstrated remarkable initiative, fortitude and great courage in spited of imminent personal danger throughout the entire rescue.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HILL, Robert Earl, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  19 January 1968
Date of Award: 
03 June 1968

For heroism on the morning of 19 January 1968 while serving as coxswain of the CG-253072, attached to the USCGC ABSECON (WHEC-374), engaged in the perilous rescue of 16 persons from the disabled motor vessel OCEAN SPRINTER in the North Atlantic Ocean. The ABSECON, diverted from Ocean Station Delta to assist, assumed on-scene command and advised the crew of the stricken vessel of the evacuation plan. Due to the severity of the weather, winds over 40 knots, and seas constantly in excess of 20 feet, rescue operations were delayed awaiting daylight. At daybreak, despite heavy seas and freezing temperatures, the CG-253072, manned by volunteers, was dispatched from the ABSECON on three separate trips. Petty Officer HILL skillfully maneuvered the boat through the heavy seaway to a position alongside the OCEAN SPRINTER from which the crew of the ship could enter the boat from a Jacob’s ladder. On the second and third trips the rescue boat, which was leaking excessively, had to be repaired and dewatered prior to return to the heavily listing ship. All crewmen of the ship were rescued and evacuated to the ABSECON. During this hazardous rescue operation, Petty Officer HILL, by his prompt actions, helped save the life of a fellow Coastguardsman who was thrown from the rescue boat. Petty Officer HILL demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Griffith, Richard J., Jones, Milton M., and Sheely, Clyde S.)


HINCHCLIFF, Ronald Lee, Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 March 1965
Date of Award: 
26 October 1965

For heroism on 25 March 1965 while serving aboard the CG-44324 when he assisted in the rescue of two persons from peril on Bodega Rock in Bodega Bay, California. The CG-44324 was dispatched from Bodega Bay Station and upon arrival on the scene located two men, one injured, stranded on a rock with 12-foot seas and 30-knot winds buffeting them. The men, who were the only survivors of a capsized outboard boat, had been washed onto the rock and were unable to help themselves due to shock and exposure.  HINCHCLIFF and another Coast Guardsman, dressed in wet suits, immediately jumped from the CG-44324 and swam 30 yards through heavy surf to Bodega Rock with lifejackets for the survivors. While the injured man was being towed on a rubber mattress by the Coast Guardsman and civilian swimmer, HINCHCLIFF remained on the rock with the remaining survivor despite the hazards of an incoming tide and roughening sea conditions. After a wait of nearly two hours, a Coast Guard helicopter hoisted both men to safety and took them to shore. HINCHCLIFF demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Note: A Silver Lifesaving Medal was also awarded to Robert F. Lange, a civilian, for his role in this rescue.)


HOAGLAND, Steven J. Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:   07 September 1989
Date of Award:   13 September 1989

Seaman HOAGLAND is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 7 September 1989 when he rescued two survivors trapped inside a cabin cruiser which capsized in 10-foot seas near Great Egg Inlet, New Jersey.  Dispatched to assist the distressed vessel, Seaman HOAGLAND arrived on scene to find two survivors clinging to the overturned hull, with a woman and a 5-year-old boy trapped inside.  As commercial divers were summoned to assist in the rescue, Seaman HOAGLAND entered the water to establish communications with the victims trapped inside.  He learned that a 4-foot air pocket, which provided the victims air to breathe, was decreasing rapidly.  As the air pocket diminished to only one and one-half feet, the overturned vessel drifted toward the surf line and sure disaster.  Informed that the commercial divers were still 15 minutes from arrival, and knowing that the victims would soon drown, Seaman HOAGLAND courageously volunteered to attempt the rescue.  Disregarding his own safety, he entered the cabin and located the victims.  Surfacing for air, he returned to find that the boy would not let go of the woman.  Undaunted, he dove again into the heaving hulk, and wrenched the frightened child free.  Seaman HOAGLAND then returned for the woman, only to have her become entangled in debris.  Displaying remarkable courage and composure, he calmly freed her, and, by his heroic action, saved two lives.  Seaman HOAGLAND demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


HOFFMAN, William R., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG 

Date of Action:  07 September 1963
Date of Award:  30 July 1964

For heroism, on 7 September 1963, while serving as coxswain of the CG-44305, engaged in rescuing a woman who was trapped in the hull of an overturned cabin cruiser near Humboldt Bay, California. HOFFMAN, when advised of the accident, proceeded to the scene about 350 yards offshore in the vicinity of twenty-foot breakers. Two crewmen from the CG-36515 were already in the water attempting to dive under the boat to rescue the victim, who could be heard screaming and pounding on the hull. HOFFMAN immediately dived into the water and, after several attempts, succeeded in getting under the cruiser, entered the cabin and located the woman in an air pocket. As he started out the door with the hysterical woman in his grasp, she pulled free and remained in the cabin. Upon surfacing, HOFFMAN called for a grapnel and line from the CG-36515 and secured it to the capsized vessel. A strain was taken on the line and the cabin cruiser was righted momentarily. HOFFMAN and another crewman quickly freed the unconscious woman before the boat again capsized and placed her aboard the lifeboat. Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation was administered to the victim, while the lifeboat was enroute to shore. She soon regained consciousness and was removed to a hospital. HOFFMAN displayed daring, fortitude, and initiative in spite of ever-present personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Gates, Lester K., Nelson, Thomas E., and Walters, James P.)


HOGUE, Andy P.,

Date of Action:  12 September 1970
Date of Award:  10 September 1971

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Ross, Robert M.)


HOHL, Clifford F., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 May 1987
Date of Award: 
05 August 1987

Petty Officer HOHL is cited for heroism on 25 May 1987 while serving as Executive Petty Officer, USCGC POINT CARREW (WPB 82374). Demonstrating outstanding professional skills, Petty Officer HOHL directed deck crew operations and served as coxswain of POINT CARREW’s smallboat during two successive rescues. On two separate occasions, he transported a POINT CARREW crewmember to and from the distressed vessels under extremely hazardous wind and sea conditions, enabling the vessels to be towed to safety. Petty Officer HOHL demonstrated expert seamanship and extraordinary courage while navigating the smallboat to and from the second vessel in gale-force winds and 20-foot seas. After five attempts, despite being thrashed about wildly, he managed to get the smallboat alongside POINT CARREW, which was taking whitewater over her mast in the turbulent seas. Back onboard, Petty Officer HOHL took immediate control of deck operations. While hoisting the smallboat, POINT CARREW took a 50-degree roll, causing the deck force to lose control of the swinging smallboat. Petty Officer HOHL’s quick, decisive actions to warn his crew and order the smallboat dropped to the deck, prevented serious injuries and possible loss of life. Petty Officer HOHL demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during these rescues. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Fisch, Kenneth L. and Maclennan, Craig E.)


HOLBROOK, Jon Howe, Ensign, USCGR

Date of Action:  28 November 1969
Date of Award: 
17 May 1970

Ensign HOLBROOK is cited for heroism on the evening of 28 November 1969 while serving on temporary additional duty at Coast Guard Loran Station, Palau, Western Caroline Island, engaged in the perilous rescue of a fellow officer from the waters of the Pacific Ocean. When he and another Coast Guard officer were swept from a cliff by a huge wave and thrown into the sea with eight to ten foot swells, Ensign HOLBROOK saw that his companion was caught under a sharp coral ledge and was unable to escape. Recognizing the exhausted condition of his companion, Ensign HOLBROOK tried to pull him to safety but another huge wave threw them into the sea. Ensign HOLBROOK, while suffering multiple lacerations and with complete disregard for his own safety, swam to his drowning companion and assisted him to the beach. Ensign HOLBROOK demonstrated unusual initiative and fortitude in spite of extreme personal danger while saving his friend’s life. His remarkable courage, unselfish action, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HOLMES, Rick L.,

Date of Action:   20 March 1992
Date of Award:  11 June 1992

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Coker, William W.)


HOLT, Gregory C., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  28 November 1980
Date of Award: 
11 March 1982

Petty Officer HOLT is cited for heroism on the night of 28 November 1980 when he assisted in the apprehension of a man who was assaulting a young woman at the White Marsh Tennis and Recreation Club, Bowie, Maryland. The victim had been walking across an unlit parking lot to her car when she was attacked. Petty Officer HOLT and another Coast Guardsman were returning to their car when they heard the woman screaming. Without hesitation the two men proceeded to the scene. As they approached, the assailant released the woman and ran into a nearby wooded area. After seeing that proper treatment was rendered to the victim, Petty Officer HOLT, his fellow Coast Guardsman, and another man, without concern for their personal safety, entered the woods to search for the assailant. Without flashlights or knowledge of the area, the three men established contact with the suspect, and tracked him for over half and hour before trapping him in an open area. As the suspect tried to escape, Petty Officer HOLT, and the civilian with him, tackled the fugitive and restrained him until the arrival of the police. Later information revealed that this criminal was armed with a knife and had been charged on four previous occasions with assault but never convicted. The actions of Petty Officer HOLT interrupted a crime of violence and directly led to the apprehension and arrest of the assailant. Additionally, his testimony in court as to what took place that night was instrumental in securing a conviction for assault and attempted rape. Petty Officer HOLT demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this incident. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HORNE, Terrell E., III, Senior Chief Boatswain's Mate, USCG

Date of Action: 02 December 2012
Date of Award: 06 December 2012

Senior Chief Petty Officer HORNE is cited for heroism on 2 December 2012 while leading a boarding team from Coast Guard Cutter HALIBUT (WPB 87340) in counter-smuggling operations near Santa Cruz Island, California.  Shortly after midnight, Senior Chief Petty Officer HORNE deployed in HALIBUT's cutter boat with three other crew members to investigate a vessel loitering in the area without navigation lights.  Upon approaching the unlit vessel and identifying themselves as law enforcement officers, the vessel ignored commands to stop and instead rapidly accelerated directly toward them.  The boarding team immediately maneuvered to avoid the oncoming vessel and fired side arms in self-defense.  When impact with the oncoming vessel became unavoidable, Senior Chief Petty Officer HORNE, disregarding his own safety in order to protect a fellow crewmember, forcibly pushed the coxswain from the helm, directly exposing himself to the oncoming vessel.  The violence of the subsequent collision forcibly ejected him from the boat, and despite immediate recovery from the water and application of first aid by his shipmates, he succumbed to the severe injuries received during the incident.  Senior Chief Petty Officer HORNE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

Official Citation PDF document icon


HORNE, William, Electrician's Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action: 08 February 2009
Date of Award: 07 February 2010

Petty Officer HORNE is cited for heroism for rescuing five people from a pickup truck involved in an accident in Guam on 8 February 2009.  While off duty with his family, Petty Officer HORNE witnessed a major automobile accident along Route 3 in Dededo, Guam.  After stopping his vehicle, he saw a pickup truck on its side near an adjacent burning car.  Seizing the initiative and bringing order to the chaos unfolding around him, he directed an onlooker to retrieve a fire extinguisher from a local restaurant and then he approached the flaming vehicle to gauge the likelihood of survivors.  Assessing the catastrophic damage to the car and the unrelenting flames enveloping it, he made the decision to disengage from the car and direct his efforts toward rescuing the people trapped inside the pickup truck. Operating within mere feet of the car which was now burning uncontrollably and in danger of exploding, Petty Officer HORNE found the pickup's doors inoperable due to the contorted metal.  At great peril to his safety, he used the fire extinguisher to shatter the windshield and gain entry.  Hearing a voice within the pickup cry out for him to save the children first, Petty Officer HORNE removed the youngest child and handed her to a bystander.  He then extricated a 9-year old boy and placed him at a safe distance from the crash.  Another bystander assisted the third child, and Petty Officer HORNE returned again to assist the parents form the pickup truck.  He continued to protect those at the scene by controlling the growing crowd of onlookers and directing traffic until the arrival of the Guam Police Department and Guam Fire and Rescue.  Petty Officer HORNE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

Official CitationPDF document icon


HOULROYD, Thomas, USCG

Date of Action:  08 October 1993
Date of Award:  08 June 1994

Citation not on file. 

(Note: LTJG Mark L. Collier, USCG, received the Air Medal for his role in this rescue)


HOWELLS, Sean H., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12-13 March 1980
Date of Award: 
20 November 1980

Petty Officer HOWELLS is cited for heroism on 12 and 13 March 1980 while engaged in a search and rescue case near the Columbia River Bar. Petty Officer HOWELLS was dispatched from the Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment as lee coxswain on Coast Guard Motor Life Boat (MLB) 44309 to escort the fishing vessel MISS KIM which was low on fuel and experiencing difficulty in crossing inbound over the Columbia River bar. Enroute to the stricken vessel, MLB 44309 encountered moderate weather conditions with seas 6 to 8 feet and winds 20 to 25 knots. Upon reaching the Bar, a very intense low pressure front began passing through the area. This caused a rapid deterioration of conditions and the seas built to 20 to 25 feet with steady winds of 60 to 65 knots gusting to 80 knots. The sea conditions soon incapacitated the assigned heavy weather coxswain and Petty Officer HOWELLS immediately assumed command. He then requested medical evacuation for the disabled coxswain and provided Station Cape Disappointment with invaluable on-scene information concerning weather conditions and possible solutions to prevent the loss of MISS KIM and the two persons on board. Shortly thereafter a Coast Guard Helicopter arrived and evacuated the coxswain and the two persons onboard MISS KIMMLB 44309 had been joined by MLB TRIUMPH by this time and both boats proceeded back to the Columbia River bar as nothing more could be done for MISS KIM. Reaching the bar, they found conditions virtually impossible and the two boats were directed to remain offshore rather than chance capsizing on the treacherous bar. Over the next 10 hours Petty Officer HOWELLS maintained control of the MLB despite 12 to15 foot seas, winds of 30 to 40 knots gusting to 60 knots, intermittent squalls with the air temperature of 46 degrees and sea temperature of 48 degrees.  Finally, on the morning of 13 March, Petty Officer HOWELLS, totally exhausted, moored his boat and returned his crew of two to the station.  Petty Officer HOWELLS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this case. His courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


HUELLE, James M., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


HUFFMAN, James B., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  16 September 1990
Date of Award:  07 November 1991

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Klaczkiewicz, Michael and Trahan, Leo J.  A Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Jean L. Colby, USCG Auxiliary, for her role in this rescue.)


HUGHES, Richard L., Aviation Machinist’s Mate Third Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  08 June 1997
Date of Award:  ??

Petty Officer HUGES is cited for heroism on the evening of 8 June 1997 while serving as flight mechanic aboard Coast Guard HH-65-A helicopter, CGNR 6549. The aircrew was engaged in the perilous rescue of five survivors from the Canadian-registered sailing vessel EZARA II which was disabled 57 miles west of Cape Mendocino, California.  Two helicopters and the Coast Guard cutter EDISTO [WPB-1313] responded from Group/Air Station Humboldt Bay to a distress call from the sailboat. A rudder casualty made the vessel difficult to control in turbulent conditions, which included 20-foot seas and winds of more than 45 knots.  With weather deteriorating and seas building to 25 feet and higher, the EZRA II was knocked down four or five times.  After the sailboat was hit broadside by a wave, knocking out cabin windows and causing injury to the crew, the master and crew of four abandoned their vessel and entered their life raft.  Helicopter 6549 arrived on scene with EDISTO and made preparations to approach the raft. During the helicopter's instrument-guided approach to a hover, sight and communications were lost.  After immediate efforts to contact and locate the aircraft and its crew yielded no response, EDISTO maneuvered alongside the raft and was able to recover the crew of EZRA II.  As the flight mechanic aboard the helicopter, Petty Officer HUGHES willingly encountered extreme ocean storm conditions and sacrificed his life while attempting to save the lives of five persons from the disabled sailing vessel.  Petty Officer HUGHES demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Caines, James G.)


INESS, Robert Albert, Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  10-22 February 1972
Date of Award: 
20 June 1972

Petty Officer INESS is cited for heroism in the performance of duty while serving aboard USCGC KLAMATH [WHEC-66] during the period 10 to 22 February 1972 engaged in rendering assistance to the Japanese freighter TENZAN MARU which was flooding and in danger of capsizing in the North Pacific Ocean, approximately 720 miles southwest of Kodiak, Alaska.  Disregarding his own safety, Petty Officer INESS voluntarily boarded the distressed vessel and frequently entered the partially flooded number two hold to make repairs, and assisted in installing shoring in an effort to strengthen the damaged frames which weakened the shell plating.  Shoring was installed and repaired constantly throughout the 13-day period under hazardous conditions of flooding, free surface effect, shifting cargo, and the threat of complete structural failure.  Though exposed to great personal danger, Petty Officer INESS’ untiring efforts, outstanding perseverance, and damage control abilities greatly contributed to the completion of the hazardous mission enabling the TENZAN MARU and her 34 crew members to reach San Francisco Bay without loss of life or further serious damage.  Petty Officer INESS’ unselfish actions, remarkable courage, sound judgment, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Azevedo, George A. and Soland, James G.)


Jackson, Angela J., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  09 May 1999
Date of Award:  28 August 2000

Citation not on file.  Coast Guard Press Release (D-14) Number 102-00 stated:

"Angela Cruz, the former Angela Jackson. . .received the Coast Guard Medal for her heroic rescue efforts following a landslide at Sacred Falls State Park, O'ahu, Hawaii, which occurred May 9, 1999.  At the time, Cruz was stationed as a seaman on the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, homeported in Honolulu.  She and three other Jarvis crewmembers were hiking in the park when the landslide occurred, dumping tons of rocks on dozens of hikers and campers.  The catastrophic event killed eight people and injured many others.  The four Jarvis crew members demonstrated a total disregard for their own personal safety by re-entering the landslide area to offer assistance.  Cruz gave first aid to a child whose foot had been nearly amputated by the falling rocks.  She then assisted an injured woman whose wrists were crushed by carrying the woman's nine-year-old child, who had a serious head injury, more than two miles from the falls area to assistance.  Cruz then headed back up the trail and picked up an injured two-year-old child and carried him more than a mile to safety.  She was honored with the Coast Guard Medal, one of the highest medals awarded during peacetime, as a result of her extraordinary heroism and courage."

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Cruz, Astrubal J.; Culnon, William R.; Williams, Jolyn)  


Jackson, Robert D., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


JAMES, Carol A., Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1991
Date of Award: 
09 October 1991  

Seaman Apprentice JAMES is cited for heroism on the night of 30 August 1991 while serving as a crewmember of Utility Boat CG-41439.   During this period, Seaman Apprentice JAMES was engaged in maintaining a safety zone around a barge being used as a platform for a fireworks display at Northeast Harbor, Maine.  During the display, sparks from the launched fireworks ignited stockpiled pyrotechnics on the deck of the barge, resulting in a tremendous explosion.  The explosion forced three persons into the water; another person was apparently unconscious and was ablaze, and a fifth person remained on the barge, sheltered behind a 55-gallon drum.  Seaman Apprentice JAMES quickly grabbed a life ring and threw it overboard towards one of the persons in the water, then tossed a heaving line to another as CG-41439 maneuvered closer to the burning barge.  She helped pull the survivors safely onboard the boat and then without regard to her own safety, she leaped aboard the still burning barge to assist in the evacuation of the two persons from the barge onto the small boat.  When a second, more powerful explosion occurred, Seaman Apprentice JAMES rushed to the aid of a wounded crewmember, and after determining the extent of his injury, assisted him back to the well-deck.  When CG-41439 arrived at Northeast Harbor, she assisted in transferring the survivors to medical authorities.  Seaman Apprentice JAMES demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.   His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Baker, Brian P., Bowen, Robert A., Depuis, Paul J., and Sherwood, Bruce E.)


JENKINS, James Caldwell, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  19 December 1961
Date of Award: 
17 September 1962  

For heroism, on the night of December 19, 1961, when he rescued a man from drowning in the Atlantic Ocean, approximately eleven miles east of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. JENKINS, who was serving on board the USCG Patrol Boat CG-95321, [later named Cape Cross] had been assisting on deck during rescue operations following the sinking of the F/V BARBARA AND GAIL. After four survivors had been brought aboard the CG-95321, a fifth survivor was spotted in the extremely rough seas. The victim was thrown a line and pulled to the starboard net. However, the man, suffering from immersion in the frigid water, exposure, and exhaustion, lost his grasp on the net and began to drift beneath the hull of the vessel. JENKINS, perceiving the man’s plight, immediately grabbed a line and plunged into the water to assist. He promptly located the foundering survivor, commenced supporting him, and towed and ultimately placed him into the rescue net on the port side of the vessel, where he was brought aboard the CG-95321. JENKINS demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during the rescue. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


JENSEN, Howard Anton, Quartermaster Third Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  07 October 1971
Date of Award:  30 November 1971
 

Petty Officer JENSEN is cited for heroism on the morning of 7 October 1971 while serving in USCGC LILAC [WLM-227] when he attempted to rescue a shipmate who was in danger of drowning in Delaware Bay, New Castle, Delaware, while the ship was conducting aids to navigation operations in the lower Delaware River area. Two crew members from LILAC were observed in the water attempting to retrieve a gangplank which had fallen into the bay. When one of the men called for help, Petty Officer JENSEN left the ship, ran to the dock, unhesitatingly dived into the water and swam toward the distressed man. Although the victim had disappeared beneath the water, Petty Officer JENSEN searched and pulled him to the surface, allowing him to catch his breath. While helping his drowning shipmate, Petty Officer JENSEN became completely exhausted. His gallant efforts in the swift current enabled a life to be saved only at the ultimate sacrifice of his own. Petty Officer JENSEN’s outstanding courage, intrepidity, and unselfish actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


JOHNSON, Albert Raymond, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  18 August 1957
Date of Award: 
18 March 1958

For heroism during the rescue operations following a violent explosion in the Oswego Water Works Tunnel, at Oswego, New York, on the evening of 18 August 1957, Albert R. JOHNSON volunteered with two other men to attempt the rescue of three construction workers trapped somewhere in the 6,200 foot tunnel under Lake Ontario.  Other workers had made several rescue attempts but were forced to withdraw because of fumes, lack of oxygen, and the distance involved. With the aid of Coast Guard OBA equipment, JOHNSON and two other members of the rescue party entered the gas and smoke filled tunnel.  Loose rock, water seepage, and toxic gas added to the hazards.  JOHNSON and the others had proceeded approximately 5,800 feet underground when they located the bodies of the victims, apparently killed by the explosion. JOHNSON demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue operation.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Leyda, Earl H.)


JOHNSON, John Emil, Chief Damage Controlman, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966

For heroic conduct on April 8, 1966, while serving on board the USCGC COOK INLET [WHEC-384] when he boarded the burning and abandoned Norwegian passenger vessel VIKING PRINCESS  to search for 40 missing survivors.  When advised of the disaster, the COOK INLET departed Guantanamo Bay to assist the Norwegian ship, afire in the vicinity of Windward Passage. Upon arrival, finding the ship burning violently and apparently abandoned, JOHNSON promptly volunteered as a member of a boarding party to search the vessel for survivors.  Despite dense smoke and heat so intense that patches of paint on the outside were bursting into flame, he boarded and assisted in searching all accessible spaces above and below decks, including the infirmary areas and crew quarters.  The boarding party remained aboard the flaming hulk for more than 20 minutes, executing a vigorous search until ascertaining that there was practically no chance that any living survivor remained aboard the VIKING PRINCESS.  Thereafter, when warned that the fire was advancing under them along the lower decks, the boarding party withdrew. JOHNSON demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Barnes, Robert S., Buechler, Albert C., Davies, Ronald J., Dinsmore, Robertson P. and O’Keefe, William)


JOHNSON, Robert W., Machinery Technician First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  04 July 1980
Date of Award:  02 February 1980

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Harshfield, Richard A. [1st award], Larue, Joe S., Michael, William R., Terrell, Bruce W., and Smith, Stephen R.)


JONES, Howard Robinson, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  20 September 1961
Date of Award: 
17 September 1962  

For heroism on the afternoon of September 20, 1961, while serving as coxswain of the CG-30474, engaged in fire fighting operations following a fire and explosion aboard the USNS POTOMAC, a tanker discharging a cargo of aviation fuel at Morehead City, North Carolina. The CG-30474 was dispatched to the scene of the disaster by the Officer of the Day, Fort Macon Lifeboat Station.  Despite great chaos and confusion and in the face of violent explosions and flying METAl from the ship, JONES skillfully maneuvered his boat in the blazing waters to the stern of the POTOMAC.  When directly under the stern, he effected the rescue of five crewmen. After delivering these survivors to shore for hospitalization, JONES again maneuvered the CG-30474 to the scene and subsequently picked up one of the two known missing crewmen.  The entire operation was conducted in the face of hazardous conditions created by the frequent flare-ups and low-level explosions.  JONES demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger while persevering in his search for survivors.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Cost Guard. 

(Note: A Silver Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Arthur K. Lewis, a civilian, for his role in this rescue.)


JONES, Milton Marshall, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  19 January 1968
Date of Award: 
03 June 1968

For heroism on the morning of January 19, 1968 while serving as crewman of the CG-253072, attached to the USCGC ABSECON (WHEC 374), engaged in the perilous rescue of 16 persons from the disabled motor vessel OCEAN SPRINTER in the North Atlantic Ocean.  The ABSECON, diverted from Ocean Station Delta to assist, assumed on-scene command and advised the crew of the stricken vessel of the evacuation plan.  Due to the severity of the weather, winds over 40 knots and seas constantly in excess of 20 feet, rescue operations were delayed awaiting daylight. At daybreak, despite heavy seas and freezing temperatures, the CG-253072, manned by volunteers, was dispatched from the ABSECON on three separate trips.  Seaman JONES aided in bringing the boat through the heavy seaway to a position alongside the OCEAN SPRINTER from which the crew of the ship could enter the boat from a Jacob’s ladder.  On the second and third trips the rescue boat, which was leaking excessively, had to be repaired and dewatered prior to return to the heavily listing ship. All crewmen of the ship were rescued and evaluated to the ABSECON.  Seaman JONES demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Griffith, Richard J., Hill, Robert E., and Sheely, Clyde S.)


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