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Taney

Historic Image Gallery


We hope that you enjoy this gallery of historic photographs of the Coast Guard cutter Taney (WPG/WHEC-37).

Unless otherwise noted, the following are official U.S. Coast Guard images.


A photo of the cutter Taney

"Coast Guard Cutter 'Roger B. Taney.'  Driving of First Rivet by Captain J. A. Furer, Manager, Industrial Dept., Navy York, Phila., PA.  May 1 - 1935."  Photo Number 142-35-F; photographer unknown.


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Roger B. Taney; her launching on 3 June 1936 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.   


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Taney, circa 1938/1939. 


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Taney, circa 1939.


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Photo taken from a scrapbook of Taney's "South Pacific Cruise" from 20 May to 20 June 1939.  The Coast Guard's task in the years leading up to the outbreak of war in the Pacific was to supply these isolated way-stations along the transpacific air routes and to relieve the American colonists who were stationed on these islands at stated intervals.  Here one of Taney's small boats lands supplies at one of the islands visited by the cutter. 


A photo of the cutter Taney

USCGC Taney (WPG-37); "Navy Yard Mare Island, Calif. 1940, CGC Taney."; no photo number; 1940; photographer unknown.

This photo shows Taney undergoing armament modifications in 1940.  One additional 5-inch gun was added in a tub aft, and two more 3-inch guns were added in raised platforms abaft the stack.  Slots were cut in her transom for the addition of depth charge tracks.  

Taney's pre-war career was spent entirely in the Pacific.  She was officially transferred to the Navy on 1 July 1941, and was based out of Honolulu where she survived the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  She immediately put to sea in search of enemy submarines


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); "U.S.C.G.C. WALNUT: 20 May 42 in background.  2 - 3"/50 dual purpose guns and 4 - 20mm machine guns."  Photo No. 1211-42; photographer unknown.

The Taney, inboard (foreground) of the buoy tender Walnut, undergoes a refit and the addition of anti-aircraft armament.  Taney, based at Honolulu, survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and then unsuccessfully searched for enemy submarines in Hawaiian waters immediately after the morning of 7 December 1941.  Walnut was based at Midway Island and survived a Japanese shelling attack there.


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); "Plan View, Amidships, Mare Island, Cal."; Photo No. 1155-44; 18 February 1944; photographer unknown.

Unique among the modifications to any of the 327-foot cutters was Taney's upgrades.  Here is an official Navy photo showing much of the additional armament.  The additional weaponry, including upgrades in electronics and fire control equipment, improved ASW gear and anti-aircraft armament was added in anticipation of duty on the Mediterranean convoys where Luftwaffe activity was intense.  No other 327 was fitted with this armament combination.


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); "Plan View, Aft., Mare Island, Cal."; Photo No. 1153-44; 18 February 1944; photographer unknown. 


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); "Shepard's Rest: A ship of the fighting U.S. Coast Guard, having shepherded another convoy across the North Atlantic, rests in a foreign port pending time for the return trip."; no date/photo number; photographer unknown.

A good profile photo of Taney after modifications.  No other 327-foot cutter received this armament package.  Her first assignment was as flagship for Task Force 66, escorting UGS-38, bound for the Mediterranean, in early April 1944.  German bombers attacked the convoy on 20 April 1944 soon after the vessels cleared Gibraltar.  Three ships from the convoy were lost, including the SS Paul Hamilton, which all 580 persons on board were killed, and the destroyer USS Landsdale (DD-246).


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); no caption/photo number; 1944; photographer unknown.


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WPG-37); "Taney, 327-foot Coast Guard combat cutter, is shown here wearing battle gray while on convoy escort duty in the Atlantic."; no  photo number; date/photographer unknown. 

After escorting convoys through the Mediterranean, Taney underwent conversion to an AGC in the Boston Navy Yard between 10 October 1944 and 29 January 1945  and served in the Pacific.  She served as a combat information center for the invasion of Okinawa in April, 1945.


A photo of the cutter Taney

USS Taney, CG (WAGC-37); no caption/photo number; 1945?; photographer unknown.

While serving as the combat information center off Okinawa, suicide air attacks became increasingly common.  Taney's gunners were credited with numerous kills and assists.  During the month of June, for example, at least 288 enemy planes attacked the ships in Taney's vicinity, and at least 96 of these were destroyed.  She survived a typhoon in mid-July and more suicide attacks.  The end of the war found Taney still off Okinawa.  After the war, Taney took part in the occupation of Wakayama, anchoring off the port city on 11 September.  While anchored there, Taney weathered another typhoon which swirled by on the 17th. She was, in fact, one of the few ships which stayed at her berth during the storm, her ground tackle holding well in the sticky clay bottom.

Departing Wakayama on 14 October, Taney returned to the west coast of the United States, via Midway, and arrived at San Francisco on 29 October.  Moving on for the east coast, Taney transited the Panama Canal and later arrived at her ultimate destination, Charleston, S.C., on 29 November, and she was then converted for peace-time operations.  


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Taney maintains surveillance of the Soviet refrigerator vessel Chernjakhovsk off northern California in May of 1965.


A photo of the cutter Taney

"The 327-ft. Cutter TANEY, based at Alameda, Calif., is one of the larger classes of Coast Guard cutters which perform rescues on the high seas, ocean station weather patrol, and many other duties at all points of the compass."; 1963; Photo No. 5710, see covering Release No. 50-63


A photo of the cutter Taney

"The Coast Guard Cutter TANEY WHEC 37 rushing to the aid of the Angelo Petri, a disabled wine tanker wallowing in a stormy sea just three and a half miles off San Francisco on a February day in 1960."  No photo number; photographer unknown.


A photo of the cutter Taney

No caption/date/number; photographer unknown.

Taney, circa early-1970s. 


A photo of the cutter Taney

"USCGC Taney (WHEC-37) with special storm tracking radar.  Replacing USCGC Gresham in manning of ocean station 'Hotel.'"  8 August 1973; Official U.S. Coast Guard Photo Number G-APA-08-08-73 (1); photographer: PA2 Baeten, USCG.

Taney is preserved as a museum ship by the Baltimore Maritime Museum in Baltimore Harbor, Maryland. 


Click here to return to the USCGC Taney's history.


Sources, and for more information, see:

1) Historical Section, Public Information Division, U.S. Coast Guard.  The Coast Guard At War, V: Transports and Escorts, Volume 1.  Washington, DC: U.S. Coast Guard, 1 March 1949.

2) Robert Scheina.  U.S. Coast Guard Cutters & Craft of World War II.  Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1981. (See especially pages 13-20).


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Last Modified 11/17/2014