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Ingham

Historic Image Gallery


We hope that you enjoy this gallery of historic photographs of the Coast Guard cutter Ingham (WPG / WHEC-35).

Unless otherwise noted, the following are official U.S. Coast Guard images.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

"Coast Guard Cutter 'Samuel D. Ingham.'  Driving of First Rivet By Rear Admiral W. C. Watts, Comd't. of Navy Yard.  Navy Yard, Phila., PA. May 1 - 1935."; 1 May 1935; Photo No. 192-35-D.; photographer unknown.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

"U.S.S. 'Samuel D. Ingham' Entering At Havana Harbor-Nov. 12 1936."; 12 November 1936; no photo number; photographer unknown [postcard image].


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date; Photo No. 163; photographer unknown.

This photo dates from 1936-1937 and shows the Ingham's crew undergoing battle practice, in this case firing both of her main 5-inch 50-caliber main batteries.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

"Ingham, Lisbon"; 15 September 1941; photographer unknown; (copy of photo provided to USCG Historian's Office by Eugene Kiss). 

Ingham was assigned to the Navy on 1 July 1941 and was sent to relieve Campbell in Lisbon.  Here she is being painted gray--even her brass and teak decking--by her entire crew, officers included, before departing Lisbon for the U.S.  Eugene Kiss, a crewman of Ingham at that time, noted: 

". . .departing Lisbon with the ship blacked out at night.  Returning to Boston and having the ship completely overhauled including new armament, going from 3 bunks to 4.  The ship camouflaged painted.  We were aboard the whole time with welding all around us.  We were sent on convoy duty convoying to England where English corvettes met us outside England and escorted them the rest of the way.  We flew NO American flag and were on our third convoy when the captain came on the speakers and announced that Pearl Harbor was attacked by Japan and this was not a drill.  We were given the letter 'A' to wear on the American Defense Medal."


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date; Photo No. 1083; photographer unknown.

Ingham fitted out for escort of convoy and anti-submarine warfare.  Note her camouflage.  The 327-foot cutters' first North Atlantic victory came when the Ingham, under the command of CDR George E. McCabe, located a submerged U-boat while screening ahead of Convoy SC-112 the night of 17 December 1942. The Ingham attacked, laying depth charges at varying depths to create what McCabe called a "hammer effect."  Matte, in his journal, noted:

"During the 8 to 12 watch tonight, while on patrol 3 miles ahead of the convoy, we picked up screw-beats of a submarine while listening, ran in and dropped three 600-pounders [depth charges].  Then, getting contact on the U-boat again by echo-ranging we made another run and gave it a 10-charge barrage. . .There is a strong possibility that we sunk him without forcing him to the surface."*****

He was right, the U-626 went to the bottom with all hands.  The Ingham's crew also carried on their traditional Coast Guard duty of saving lives.  They rescued survivors from the torpedoed SS Henry R. Mallory, Robert E. Hopkins, West Portal, Jeremiah Van Rensseler and all hands of the Matthew Luckenback


A photo of the cutter Ingham

"U.S.C.G.C. W 35.  NAVY YARD, NEW YORK."; 28 May 1944; Photo No. F644C6169; photographer unknown.

From mid-1943 until mid-1944 she escorted convoys to the Mediterranean and back--as she appears in this photo--before being converted to an AGC (amphibious force flagship; also known as a Combined Operations Communications Headquarters Ship) in October 1944.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

USS Ingham, CG (WAGC-35); "U.S. Navy Yard, S.C. . .U.S.S. INGHAM, (W 35), Starboard Bow."; Photo No. 2878-44; 11 October 1944; photographer unknown.

After her conversion to an AGC, done in the Charleston Navy Yard between 1 August and 21 October 1944, Ingham was assigned to duty in the Pacific, and served throughout the campaign to liberate the Philippine Islands.  From 13-18 February 1945 she served as the flagship of the Mariveles-Corregidor Attack Group; 18 March 1945 she was the flagship for the landings on Tigbauanan, Panay; on 29 March 1945 she served at the landings on Negros Island; and in July 1945 she served as the flagship for the Balut Island Attack Unit.  Note how her camouflage has changed.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

Life on board after the conversion of the 327's could get cramped.  Commander Dean W. Colbert (with Dr. Robert M. Carter), wrote in his memoir of life on board Ingham:

". . .during major landings, we accommodated up to 360 persons onboard and there was literally standing room only. . .Mealtime was a carefully orchestrated operation.  Up to 1000 meals per day were prepared and served out of a galley roughly the size of a kitchen in a 4-bedroom house. . .It was a challenge by any standard, but Ingham's crew rose to the occasion.  Many of the 'black gang' . . .and other crew members had been on board during the worst of the U-boat campaigns in the North Atlantic.  As a whole, the crew was superb, especially the chief and first class petty officers.  They were a tremendously capable and reliable group."


Crewmen of the Ingham

No caption/date/photo number (not an official U.S. Coast Guard photo).  

Mr. Frank Salvucci, Jr., whose father served aboard Ingham during the war, provided this photo of his father and his shipmates.  He noted: "My father told me that [this] photo was taken by the ship's photographer who's nickname happened to be 'Photo.'  The importance of the group photo is in that all of the individuals were from Massachusetts.  My father is the one in the center with the beard. . .The photo was published in a major Boston newspaper back in the 1944 time frame.

Note: Not an official U.S. Coast Guard photo.


A photo of the Ingham

No caption/date/photo number (not an official U.S. Coast Guard photo).  

Mr. Frank Salvucci, Jr., whose father served aboard Ingham during the war, provided this photo of the Ingham in Formosa sometime in 1944.

Note: Not an official U.S. Coast Guard photo.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

Ingham, after most of her added wartime armament was removed and she was converted for peace-time duty, circa 1946.  The surviving 327's remained in service through the next thirty years and in the case of Ingham, until 27 May 1988.  Her active-duty career spanned a total of almost 52 years!  She has been preserved as a museum ship at Patriot's Point Naval and Maritime Museum in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. 


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

The Ingham, circa 1950, fitted out for ocean station/weather patrol operations.  She still carries a 5"-38 caliber main battery, 40 mm anti-aircraft cannons, and ASW depth charge projectors.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

The Ingham, circa 1965.  She still carries a 5"-38 caliber main battery and ASW depth charge projectors but her 40 mm anti-aircraft cannons have been removed.  


A photo of the cutter Ingham

"CGC Ingham (WHEC-35), Chespeake [sic] Bay."; 22 May 1968; Photo No. 052268-01; photo by 'Conway.'

This photo shows Ingham just prior to being deployed to Vietnam.  Note her new "racing stripe," which was authorized for all Coast Guard cutters in 1967.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

The Ingham, circa 1968, undergoing an UNREP, short for "Underway Replenishment" in the waters off Vietnam.  She spent a total of 12 months on this deployment and steamed for over 60,000 miles.  During her deployment, she received a total of 58 underway replenishments and replenished many Navy Swift boats and Coast Guard 82-foot patrol boats herself.  She participated in Operation Sea Lords and Operation Swift Raiders, earning an unprecedented two Presidential Unit Citations, the only cutter to be so honored.  She had conducted dozens of naval gunfire support missions, firing on Viet Cong positions in support of ground troops ashore.  


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photographer unknown.

[The Ingham returning home to Norfolk from her Vietnam deployment on 2 May 1969?]  


A photo of the cutter Ingham

No caption/date/photo number; photo by Kathi Boatman.


A photo of the cutter Ingham

Original caption stated: "Presently based at Portsmouth, Virginia, the Coast Guard cutter INGHAM is one of the 327-ft. 'Secretary Class' of cutters built in 1936.  Early in her career she operated on the Bering Sea Patrol out of Seattle and Port Angeles, Wash.  During World War II she engaged in convoy escort duties in Greenland waters and the North Atlantic, making a number of trips to Casablanca and Bizerte.  She saw combat duty in the Caribbean and later in the Pacific campaign areas.  In 1968, while assigned to combat duty in the Vietnam War, she also dispensed medical assistance to So. Vietnamese villages.  Her peace-time duties have included search and rescue operations, law enforcement, ocean station patrol, among others."; 18 July 1978; Photo No. G-BPA-07-18-78 (01); photographer unknown.


Retired cutter Ingham in Key West, 2010

Ingham after a refit and sporting new paint at her new home-port in Key West, Florida, where she resides as an active museum ship with the "U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham (WPG-35) Maritime Museum & National Historic Landmark".  Photo provided courtesy of Bill Verge, Director.

Click here to return to USCGC Ingham's history.


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Last Modified 10/28/2014