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U.S. Coast Guard Awards


Coast Guard Medal
Award Citations, R-S


RARAS, Manuel R., Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


RAY, Thomas A., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 May 1982
Date of Award:  18 October 1982

Petty Officer RAY is cited for heroism on 25 May 1982 when he secured a towing hawser to the 186-foot M/V WESTPRO and assisted in the tow of a disabled boat with four persons on board to safety.  The WESTPRO was burning out of control and grounded on the east breakwall of the Seward, Alaska boat harbor.  Following numerous explosions of dangerous chemicals that caused the evacuation of the north side of the City of Seward, Petty Officer RAY volunteered as a crewman of the small boat from USCGC CAPE JELLISON.  As the small boat was brought alongside WESTPRO, Petty Officer RAY secured the towing hawser to the burning ship and cut its anchor cable.  As CAPE JELLISON took WESTPRO in tow, Petty Officer RAY observed a disabled boat with four persons on board that was in danger of colliding with WESTPRO.  With complete disregard for his own safety, Petty Officer RAY secured a tow-line and the disabled boat was towed to safety.  Petty Officer RAY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and seamanship throughout this incident. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Alessandrini, John H.)


RECTOR, James Harold, Engineman First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  26 May 1968
Date of Award:  15 August 1968

For heroism on the morning of May 26, 1968 while serving as crew member of the [motor lifeboat] CG-44303, engaged in the perilous rescue of one survivor and the subsequent search for three other persons from the capsized pleasure craft YUM-YUM at Umpqua River Entrance, Winchester Bay, Oregon. Despite 35-knot winds and rough seas with 12- to 15-foot breakers which broke up the pleasure craft YUM-YUM.  The CG-44303 proceeded to the scene and upon arrival sighted the bow section in the surf and a survivor about 75 feet away repeatedly going under the surface.  As the CG-44303 was maneuvered alongside, surf broke over the decks and the victim disappeared under the port side. Seaman Petty Officer RECTOR leaned far over the side of the boat on the down roll and, although at times completely submerged, seized and held the survivor until he could be pulled to safety.  Learning that three other persons had been aboard the demolished craft, the CG-44303 then commenced a search for the missing men while maneuvering in breaking swells for approximately 30 minutes, grounding once, frequently rolling broadside and repeatedly being engulfed by the surf.  Petty Officer RECTOR was constantly on the alert for the survivors and skillfully assisted in the recovery of two victims.  Petty Officer RECTOR demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Friday, Robert G. and McAdams, Thomas D.)


REGER, Kristin, Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 24 July 2008
Date of Award: 20 October 2010

Official Citation PDF Icon


REHBERG, John Charles, Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USGC

Date of Action:  12 September 1971
Date of Award:  29 December 1971

Petty Officer REHBERG is cited for heroic conduct on the morning of 12 September 1971 while serving as Officer-in-Charge of the CG-44361, engaged in the perilous attempted rescue of seven persons from the waters of Coos Bay Entrance, Charleston, Oregon. When dispatched to assist in the rescue of survivors from two pleasure craft which had capsized in 10- to12-foot breaking seas along the Coos Bay South Jetty, Petty Officer REHBERG quickly proceeded to the scene. He skillfully maneuvered through the turbulent surf to the vicinity of the seven victims and, with outstanding seamanship, cleared the dangerous jetty rocks and placed a swimmer in the water to assist three of the victims alongside the boat for recovery. Realizing that his swimmer was too exhausted to retrieve a fourth victim, Petty Officer REHBERT again maneuvered the CG-44361 to a position in the heavy pounding seas to effect the rescue. He then proceeded to Coos Bay Station where the four victims were transferred to an ambulance. Petty Officer REHBERG demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in the spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Duke, Angus C., Forster, Mark H., and Grigsby, Danny L.  Gold Lifesaving Medals were also awarded to Eston L. White, Charles G. Mack, and Alton A. Edlund, civilians, for their respective roles in this rescue)  


REYNOLDS, James Dale, Boilerman Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  13 September 1971
Date of Award:  ??

Petty Officer REYNOLDS is cited for heroism on the night of 13 September 1971 as crewman of Coast Guard skiff CG-121505 engaged in the perilous rescue of six victims of the Perkiomen Creek flood in Montgomery County near Lower Indian Head Road in Oaks, Pennsylvania. Petty Officer REYNOLDS unhesitatingly accompanied another Coast Guardsman to the scene where heavy rains had caused flash flooding of the creek to an estimated 15 to 18 feet above normal with currents of 10 to 15 knots. He assisted in maneuvering the skiff through the flood waters, around trees and live power cables, to a house where four people were trapped on the rooftop and two more were stranded in trees. Despite darkness, with only a flashlight and candles held by the victims, Petty Officer REYNOLDS and his companion rescued three persons and took them to safety. They quickly returned to remove the two remaining victims from the roof along with a man found in a tree behind the house. Enroute to shore, the outboard motor failed and the boat broached and was swept into a telephone pole. The five occupants were thrown into the cold water and struggled to remain with the boat for three hours. During this period Petty Officer REYNOLDS used his belt to assist one of the victims from being swept away by the current while aiding and comforting all of them until help arrived. Petty Officer REYNOLDS demonstrated unusual initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout the entire rescue mission. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Eppert, Jack L. A Silver Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Lawrence M. Spedden, a civilian, for his role in this rescue).


RHODES, Michael A., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  28 January 1980
Date of Award:  29 April 1980

Seaman RHODES is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 28 January 1980 when he assisted in the perilous rescue of at least two persons following the collision between USCGC BLACKTHORN [WLB-391] and SS CAPRICORN in Tampa Bay, Florida.  Shortly after the collision and within 15 to 20 seconds after commencing a roll to port, BLACKTHORN capsized, thereby precluding a bridge command to prepare for and execute an orderly abandon ship. During this period, Seaman RHODES was on the mess-deck with a large number of the crew. As BLACKTHORN rolled over on her port beam and commenced taking on water, Seaman RHODES made his way forward through the flooding compartment to the starboard door leading to the buoy deck.  Standing on the port bulkhead, he undogged the watertight door and used his considerable strength to hold open the 130 pound door.  Instead of egressing from this extremely perilous situation, he remained in position until at least two of his shipmates were able to escape.  Then, as flooding of the messdeck continued, he fully opened the door and made good his own escape.  Seaman RHODES demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during this incident.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Miller, John S.; Flores, William R.)


RICE, Dominic L., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  08 February 1986
Date of Award:  07 August 1986

Petty Officer RICE is cited for extraordinary heroism on 8 February 1986 while serving as coxswain of a Coast Guard small boat.  On that afternoon, he was engaged in the rescue of 19 victims who had been thrown into the water from the fishing vessel MARY JANE, which had broached and heeled sharply as a result of 10-foot waves crashing over the vessel’s deck. Petty Officer RICE, who had just returned from a day of surfing, immediately took charge of a Coast Guard small boat and proceeded to the scene, bringing his surfboard along with him. Within minutes, the small boat was on scene.  Carefully maneuvering the small boat toward Bodega Rock, Petty Officer RICE spotted the survivors in the water, between Bodega Head and Bodega Rock, desperately battling 10 to 14-foot waves.  To reach the survivors quickly and to ensure the safety of his crew. Petty Officer RICE turned control of the Coast Guard Small boat over to a fellow crew ember, and without regard for his own safety, entered the water on his surfboard.  Petty Officer RICE located a young boy suffering from shock and hypothermia.  He quickly pulled him onto his surfboard and paddled him to safety.  Returning to the scene, Petty Officer RICE found an older man trying desperately to stay afloat.  He again pulled the victim onto his surfboard, and swam back to the awaiting rescue boat towing the victim behind him.  Petty Officer RICE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


RICHMOND, Patrick L., Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  11 September 1993
Date of Award:  06 October 1993

Seaman Apprentice RICHMOND is cited for heroism on the night of 11 September 1993 while engaged in the rescue of eight Haitian migrants from the capsized sailing vessel JACQUES IMMACULEE in the Caribbean Sea north of Haiti.  The 25-foot, rudderless, overloaded sailboat, bound for Miami, Florida, was found adrift with 46 Haitian migrants aboard.  A dark, moonless night coupled with six- to eight-foot breaking seas and winds gusting over 20 knots added to the severity of the situation.  Shortly after the first 12 migrants were safely transported to Coast Guard Cutter MOHAWK, a nine-foot wave struck the sailboat broadside causing it to capsize, tossing the remaining passengers into the sea.  Seaman Apprentice RICHMOND, as one of MOHAWK's rescue swimmers, entered the water from MOHAWK's Motor Surf Boat and began swimming for the capsized sailboat.  Fighthing the adverse conditions and swimming over 20 yards each way, Seaman Apprentice RICHMOND heroically assisted then frightened migrants, and swam them safely back to the Motor Surf Boat.  In two instances, Seaman Apprentice RICHMOND ferried two Haitian migrants back to the Motor Surf Boat at the same time.  Seaman Apprentice RICHMOND demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring, in spite of imminent personal danger, in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Manno, Lance, SN)


RIDER, Kenneth Roger, Lieutenant Junior Grade, USCG

Date of Action:  08 November 1959
Date of Award:  28 April 1960

For heroism during the fire fighting operations following a fire and explosion aboard the tanker AMOCO VIRGINIA at Hess Terminal Corporation on the Houston Ship channel, Houston, Texas, on 8 November 1959.  Lieutenant (junior grade) RIDER, being Officer of the Day at Captain of the Port, Houston, proceeded to the scene immediately following the explosion.  On arrival he found chaos and confusion.  He initially assumed and was subsequently designated On Scene Commander and functioned as such during the twenty hour duration of the fire . He continually exposed himself to danger above and beyond the call of duty, while calmly, steadfastly, and intelligently directing Coast Guard activities and assisting vitally the City of Houston Fire Chief.  On two occasions he boarded the furiously burning tanker to search for survivors of the ship’s crew, at great risk to his own life.  Lieutenant (junior grade) RIDER demonstrated initiative and fortitude in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


ROBINSON, Lyle D., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  21 August 1982
Date of Award:  09 October 1984

Petty Officer ROBINSON is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 21 August 1982 while serving as crewman on Coast Guard Utility Boat 41392 from Coast Guard Station Mare Island, when he rescued a man trapped in a gas-filled compartment of a ship. The man was unconscious, caught by the foot three decks down in the vessel GO GO RACER moored at Pacific Refinery, Hercules, California.  Without regard for his personal safety, Petty Officer ROBINSON entered the vapor-filled compartment twice; first to survey the situation, and again to place his own bio-pack breathing apparatus on the victim.  Petty Officer ROBINSON then exited the compartment without his breathing apparatus, barely reaching the main deck before almost succumbing go the deadly fumes.  Rescuers then removed the victim from the compartment, where he was evacuated to an area hospital by a waiting helicopter.  Petty Officer ROBINSON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent personal danger in the rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


ROGEAN, Edward J., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  08 August 1975
Date of Award:  18 October 1976

Seaman ROGEAN is cited for heroism on the night of 8 August 1975 while serving as the coxswain of a 13-foot Zodiac test boat during the rescue of the pilot of a downed aircraft in heavy seas off Race Point Light, Provincetown, Massachusetts.  Upon notification of the downed plane, Seaman ROGEAN and a rescue crew from Coast Guard Station Race Point proceeded to the scene and upon arrival were confronted with turbulent seas and high winds that severely hampered the launching of the rescue boat. After repeated attempts, the boat was launched and with no navigational equipment, Seaman ROGEAN skillfully maneuvered the boat toward the pilot’s cries for help.  Within minutes the gravely injured pilot was located clinging to the wreckage from the plane, and was swiftly brought aboard.  As Seaman ROGEAN piloted the craft toward shore, the violent seas capsized the boat, and the occupants were hurled into the sea.  Seaman ROGEAN, with complete disregard for his own safety, seized the victim as the boat was capsizing and shielded him with his own body, absorbing the full weight of the boat and its contents as it crashed on top of them.  After reaching the safety of shore, and insuring that the injured man received proper medical attention, Seaman ROGEAN attempted to return to the plane to search for another member of the aircraft.  This attempt was thwarted by the fierceness of the seas that prevented the boat from being launched. Seaman ROGEAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Kelley, David W.)


ROGERS, Randall W., Machinery Technician First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  08 May 1985
Date of Award:  04 February 1986

Petty Officer ROGERS is cited for heroism for his efforts to combat a major engine room fire and attempts to rescue a trapped shipmate aboard USCGC CHASE (WHEC 718) on 8 May 1985.  At approximately 1330 that day, an explosive fire broke out forward of the main diesel engines.  Equipment was secured and the space evacuated, but one person was trapped in the engine room.  Hearing that a crew member was not accounted for, Petty Officer ROGERS left his standby billet on the mess deck in an attempt to find him. He searched the auxiliary machinery space but was driven back by the intense heat and smoke from the fire.  He proceeded to the control booth, via the mess deck scuttle, secured fuel valves and running machinery, and entered the burning engine room to set up ventilation equipment and enhanced the safety and efficiency of the fire-fighting parties.  Despite severe personal danger, he then searched the forward-upper level of the engine room, followed by the second level between the main diesel engines, and the aft-outboard of both reduction gears and the evaporator flat. Petty Officer ROGERS then entered the lower level of the engine room from the diesel oil pump room about the same time as the fire party put out the fire and joined him in his search, finding the body of the missing crew ember. Although he personally was unable to locate his missing shipmate, Petty Officer ROGER’s heroic efforts were an inspiration to others.  Petty Officer ROGERS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue attempt.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


ROMERO, Bernardino Silan, Chief Stewardsman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 April 1969
Date of Award:  08 December 1969

Chief Petty Officer ROMERO is cited for heroic conduct on 30 April 1969 while serving as a member of a fire-fighting party dispatched from USCGC COURAGEOUS (WMEC 623) engaged in extinguishing a fire aboard the gasoline and naphtha-laden tanker MOBIL APEX  in Limetree Bay, St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Disregarding his own safety, Chief Petty Officer ROMERO boarded the burning vessel, assisted in laying hoses and cooling the port superstructure to allow entrance to the blazing compartments and was instrumental in applying foam and water into the raging engine room fire of the MOBILE APEX. Chief Petty Officer ROMERO’s outstanding initiative, courageous perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty, in spite of imminent personal danger, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


ROSE, Christopher S.

Date of Action:  05 December 1993
Date of Award:  01 April 1994

Seaman Apprentice ROSE is cited for heroism on 5 December 1993 while assigned as crewmember aboard utility boat CG-41311, U.S. Coast Guard Station St. Inigoes, Maryland.  The crew responded to a distress call from the fishing vessel EL TORO II, a charter vessel with 23 persons on board, that was sinking approximately four nautical miles off Point Lookout, Maryland.  Braving frigid temperatures, seven-to-nine foot seas, gale force winds, and limited visibility, Seaman Apprentice ROSE, without hesitation or regard for his own well-being and wearing only an exposure suit, entered the water from the utility boat and assisted in the rescue of nine people from the freezing waters.  Upon noticing a person in a different raft whose face was being covered with water, Seaman Apprentice ROSE jumped from his raft to assist the victim by holding his head out of the water until he could be safely brought aboard the utility boat.  He then returned to the raft where the last survivor was clinging with fear, and began to pry his fingers loose from the lines.  Once all victims were safely on board the utility boat, Seaman Apprentice ROSE helped in the hoisting and evacuation of three critically hypothermic survivors.  During the return transit to Point Lookout, he turned his attention to the morale of his crew mates, using his enthusiasm to lift their spirits.  Seaman Apprentice ROSE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Beach, Eugene W., Machovec, Kirk A., and Montgomery, Tyrone M.  In addition, AE3 Thomas H. Parker, USCG, received the Air Medal and BM2 Michael D. Warner, USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” device for their roles in this rescue)


ROSEWAREN, John R., Aviation Machinists Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  01 September 1963
Date of Award:  15 May 1964

For heroism, on the afternoon of September 1, 1963, while serving as aircrewman of a Coast Guard helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of the occupants of a pleasure craft which had capsized in the turbulent surf off Peacock Spit, at the mouth of the Columbia River Bar, Ilwaco, Washington. The helicopter was on routine search and rescue patrol when advised of the accident by Cape Disappointment Lifeboat Station. Upon arrival in the area, ROSEWAREN directed the pilot to a position where a rescue of one survivor by hoist operation was effected in a matter of seconds. When another victim was sighted, face down and apparently unconscious in the water, ROSEWARN voluntarily climbed into the helicopter rescue basket and was lowered into the cold, turbulent seas in an attempt to rescue this person. While attempting to place the unconscious man in the rescue basket, he was overcome by a fifteen foot breaker which caused him to lose his grip on the basket and the victim. Upon surfacing he began swimming toward the helpless man but once again was thwarted by a large breaker which threw him onto the rocks. ROSEWAREN then progressed along the rocks looking for the survivors and a spot to reenter the surf to attempt another rescue. His determination to accomplish the rescue ceased only when the pilot of the helicopter placed the aircraft in front of him and directed him to return to the beach. ROSEWARN demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of ever present personal danger during the entire operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


ROSS, Aaron M., Marine Science Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  01 December 1982
Date of Award:  16 May 1983

Petty Officer ROSS is cited for heroism on the evening of 1 December 1982 when he assisted in the rescue of an unconscious man from a burning vehicle moments before it exploded. Petty Officer ROSS and another Coast Guardsman, both assigned to Marine Safety Office St. Louis, were enroute to a Mississippi River cargo dock when they observed a late model sports car leave the roadway, strike a nearby highway sign, and burst into flames. Petty Officer ROSS radioed for help as his partner turned their vehicle around and headed for the wrecked car. Upon arrival at the scene almost half of the vehicle was aflame. Petty Officer ROSS unsuccessfully attempted to free the car’s lone occupant, while his partner concentrated on extinguishing the flames with a fire extinguisher from the Coast Guard vehicle. The driver’s door was jammed shut by the crash and the passenger side was in flames. Undaunted, Petty Officer ROSS tore off the car’s T-top and began lifting the driver through the roof; however, the steering wheel had pinned the man in his seat and no amount of effort could free him. Immediately, and with complete disregard for their own safety, using bare hands, the two men forced the door open. Working quickly, his partner held the steering wheel clear of the injured driver while Petty Officer ROSS pulled him form the burning wreckage.   As they carried the victim away from the vehicle it exploded and was completely engulfed in flames.  The two men then administered first aid to the driver, who had sustained cuts on the head, until the arrival of the fire department.  Petty Officer ROSS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Clukey, Wayne D.)


ROSS, Robert Mark, Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  12 August 1970
Date of Award:  27 January 1971

Seaman ROSS is cited for heroic conduct on the afternoon of 12 August 1970 while serving as crew number of CG-44234 engaged in the rescue of the operator of the fishing vessel ALICE which sank in 25 fathoms of water west of Table Bluff, California. Upon arrival on scene, Seaman ROSS boarded the vessel with a portable pump to begin dewatering operations. Six minutes later, before he could get the pump in operation, the vessel began to sink stern first. Seaman ROSS swam away from the sinking ship, however, he noticed that the operator was caught in the rigging and was going down with the vessel. With complete disregard for his own safety, Seaman ROSS immediately returned to the sinking vessel to assist him. By his quick and heroic efforts he was able to free the man who was trapped below the water in the rigging. Seaman ROSS’ unselfish actions, remarkable courage, and unwavering devotion to duty, in spite of imminent personal danger, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United State Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Hogue, Andy P.)


RUH, Steven M., Boatswain's Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action: 15 August 2006
Date of Award: 26 December 2006

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SALO, Steven L., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  15 November 1977
Date of Award:  27 February 1978

Petty Officer SALO is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 15 November 1977 when he assisted in the rescue of six Coast Guardsmen from drowning near the Columbia River Bar, Washington. Petty Officer SALO was serving as student crewmember on board Coast Guard Utility Boat 41332 when it capsized during a night navigational exercise. Overcoming the initial shock of being capsized and trapped inside the hull of the boat, Petty Officer SALO helped calm the crew and identify those present and missing. He then helped clear the debris floating among the survivors, took inventory of the survival equipment on hand, and began planning an escape route. After effecting his own escape, petty Officer SALO proceeded to encourage the remaining crewmen to make their escape by yelling to those still inside and again describing in detail the escape route. Upon the arrival of a Coast Guard helicopter, Petty Officer SALO, with complete disregard for his personal safety, grabbed the rescue basket six times, accepting the static electricity shock each time, and assisted his fellow crewmen into it, despite surging 18-foot breakers. With the other survivors safely in the helicopter, Petty Officer SALO, suffering from the onset of hypothermia and with no one to assist, was then hoisted to safety. Petty Officer SALO’s remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger resulted in the saving of the six crewmen and himself. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SANDERS, Charles Haley, Commander, USCG

Date of Action:  29 April-02 May 1969
Date of Award:  08 December 1969

Commander SANDERS is cited for heroic conduct during the period 29 April to 2 May 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer, USCGC COURAGEOUS (WMEC 622) and as On-Scene Commander during fire fighting operations for the gasoline and naphtha-laden tanker MOBIL APEX in Limetree, St. Croix, Virgin Island. Commander SANDERS, with unusual leadership and resourcefulness, was underway to assist the stricken vessel in less than two hours after being alerted. He quickly assumed On-Scene Commander responsibilities and after a brief but competent evaluation of the situation commenced making vital decisions to successfully combat the fires. His exceptional ability and dedication in directing the efforts of Coast Guard units and other assisting vessels during the dangerous operation contributed significantly to preventing further loss of life and property. Commander SANDERS’ outstanding initiative, heroic perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United State Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Anderson, Peter J. and Helmer, George P.)


SAUER, Dennis Wayne, Seaman, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  12 June 1966
Date of Award:  20 October 1966

For heroism on the afternoon of June 12, 1966 when he attempted to rescue two children from the treacherous surf, three miles south of Westport, Washington, near Twin Harbor State Park. SAUER was at the beach on authorized liberty from the USCGC NORTHWIND (WAGB 282) when advised that the children had been swept to sea. Disregarding the six to eight foot breakers, unusual tidal currents, and severe underflow, he immediately entered the turbulent surf in an attempt to rescue the children. SAUER perished in this gallant effort. His outstanding courage, intrepidity, initiative, and unselfish action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United State Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Van Loben Sels, Frederick)


SCANLON, Michael J., Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action:  06 June 1984
Date of Award:  ??

Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON is cited for heroism while directing the rescue of 64 Haitian refugees from a capsized sailing vessel on the afternoon of 6 June 1984.  Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON was conducting a routine Haitian Migrant Interdiction Operation boarding of a suspect vessel approximately 75 miles northwest of Cape Haitien, Haiti.  Shortly after boarding the vessel, Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON immediately began placing life jackets on the refugees, who were to be transferred to the motor surf boat. Soon thereafter, as the Haitians began to surge topside, the sailing vessel rolled dangerously to port, settled by the stern, and capsized, throwing Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON and approximately 80 refugees into the water.  Surrounded by the frightened refugees, struggling to stay afloat, Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON immediately removed his personal floatation device and gave it to three of the victims.  Later, when a rescue boat approached him, Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON, although extremely fatigued, while treading water in five to six-foot seas, waved the boat off. Without regard for his own personal safety, he directed the motor surf boat’s rescue of other personnel in the water, almost certainly saving the lives of many who would otherwise have perished.  Chief Warrant Officer SCANLON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(A Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Harold Boyce, and agent with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, for his role in this rescue).


SCHLIMME, Matthew E., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  12 February 1997
Date of Award:  18 February 1997

Petty Officer SCHLIMME is cited for extraordinary heroism on 12 February 1997 while serving as a crew member aboard Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat CG-44363, attached to Coast Guard Station Quillayute River. Shortly before 1 o’clock in the morning, responding to a distress call from the sailing vessel GALE RUNNER, Station Quillayute River launched two rescue boats. The operator of GALE RUNNER reported that the vessel was dismasted, taking on water, and in danger of sinking 2 miles south of the Quillayute River entrance. Seas of up to 25 feet, combined with high winds and driving rain, created a situation of imminent danger for the two people aboard the GALE RUNNER.  Soon after crossing the treacherous bar in an attempt to reach the stricken sailboat, the motor lifeboat suddenly rolled over several times in the surf and confused seas. As a result of the repeated roll-overs, Petty Officer SCHLIMME was forcibly separated from his rescue craft and thrown into the churning ocean.  A Coast Guard HH-65 helicopter from Air Station Port Angeles was able to hoist to safety the two people from the GALE RUNNER as it crashed onto rocks. As a crew member of Coast Guard CG-44363, Petty Officer SCHLIMME willingly entered extreme ocean storm conditions and sacrificed his life while attempting to save the lives of the two people from the GALE RUNNER. Petty Officer SCHLIMME demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bosley, David A., Miniken, Clinton P., and Wingo, Benjamin F.  In addition, as a result of their actions in this rescue the following Coast Guardsmen received the Distinguished Flying Cross: AM3 Neal W. Amos, CDR Paul A. Langlois, and CDR Raymond J. Miller)


SCOGGINS, Joseph T., SNSS, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


SEIPP, Frank F. II, Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:   22 August 1976
Date of Award:  13 April 1978

Citation not on file.  

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Kaufman, Jeffrey L.)


SEXTON, Charles W., Machinery Technician First Class, USCG (Posthumous Award; Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  11 January 1991
Date of Award:  09 April 1991

Petty Officer SEXTON is cited for extraordinary heroism on 11 January 1991 while serving as emergency medical technician aboard Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat CG-44381.  The boat crew was responding to a distress call from F/V SEA KING, a 75-foot stern trawler with four persons on board, which was taking on water and in danger of sinking, four nautical miles northwest of the Columbia River Bar, with her decks awash and after compartment and engine room steadily filling up with water.  From the relative safety the motor lifeboat, Petty Officer SEXTON unselfishly volunteered to go aboard the foundering fishing vessel to treat the injuries of a SEA KING crew member who had fallen to the deck boat during a failed helicopter hoist.  He skillfully diagnosed the victim’s injuries, informed the flight surgeon of the extent of the injuries and provided first aid treatment.  Once the victim was stabilized, Petty Officer SEXTON turned his attention to assisting with the dewatering of the vessel.  The SEA KING required several dewatering pumps to remove the initial quantity of sea water from the engine room.  Then, hourly dewatering of the vessel was necessary to maintain proper trim aboard the vessel.  After more than 6 hours of this exhausting routine, with the worst of the treacherous bar crossing behind them, the SEA KING suddenly, without warning, rolled over, throwing victims into the churning seas and trapping Petty Officer SEXTON in the enclosed pilot house.  He went down with vessel, sacrificing his life while attempting to save the lives of the SEA KING’s crew members.  Petty Officer SEXTON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

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SHEALEY, Evart David, Engineman Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  13 September 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of September 13, 1967 while attached to the USCGC McCULLOCH [WHEC-386] as boat engineer of a 25-foot motor surfboat engaged in the hazardous rescue of five persons from the ketch VOILE D’OR which was disabled in the North Atlantic Ocean during hurricane Doria. After gale-force winds had thwarted previous pans to pass a towline to the rudderless ketch, Petty Officer SHEALEY and four other volunteers manned the rescue boat, which was launched in 35-foot seas to effect the rescue. As the small boat was maneuvered alongside the VOILE D’OR, the survivors, with tending lines attached, were urged to jump into the water.  Petty Officer SHEALEY, upon observing that an elderly lady was unable to help herself towards the boat, unhesitatingly jumped into the sea, swam to her assistance, and helped her into the rescue boat. After he was helped on board, he assisted in pulling the other four survivors to safety.  Petty Officer SHEALEY demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring despite imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SHEELY, Clyde Shannon, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  19 January 1968
Date of Award:  03 June 1968

For heroism on the morning of January 19, 1968 while serving as oarsman of the CG-253072, attached to the USCGC ABSECON (WHEC-374), engaged in the perilous rescue of 16 persons from the disabled motor vessel OCEAN SPRINTER in the North Atlantic Ocean. The ABSECON, diverted from Ocean Station Delta to assist, assumed on-scene command and advised the crew of the stricken vessel of the evacuation plan. Due to the severity of the weather, winds over 40 knots and seas constantly in excess of 20 feet, rescue operations were delayed awaiting daylight.  At daybreak, despite heavy seas and freezing temperatures, the CG-253072, manned by volunteers, was dispatched from the ABSECON on three separate trips. Seaman SHEELY aided in bringing the boat through the heavy seaway to a position alongside the OCEAN SPRINTER from which the crew of the ship could enter the boat from a Jacob’s ladder.  On the second and third trips the rescue boat, which was leaking excessively, had to be repaired and dewatered prior to return to the heavily listing ship.  All crewmen of the ship were rescued and evaluated to the ABSECON.  Seaman SHEELY demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Griffith, Richard J., Hill, Robert E., and Jones, Milton M.)


SHERWOOD, Bruce E., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1991
Date of Award:  09 October 1991

Petty Officer SHERWOOD is cited for heroism on the night of 30 August 1991 while serving as engineer and emergency medical technician (EMT) of Utility Boat CG-41439. During this period, Petty Officer SHERWOOD was engaged in maintaining a safety zone around a barge being used as a platform for a fireworks display at Northeast Harbor, Maine. During the display, sparks from the launched fireworks ignited stockpiled pyrotechnics on the deck of the barge, resulting in a tremendous explosion. The explosion forced three persons into the water; another person was apparently unconscious and was ablaze, and a fifth person remained on the barge, sheltered behind a 55-gallon drum. Petty Officer SHERWOOD immediately activated the fire pump and grabbed a heaving line to throw to the men in the water as CG-41439 maneuvered closer to the burning barge. Noticing a man lying face down on the barge, apparently unconscious, Petty Officer SHERWOOD grabbed the EMT kit and, without regard to his own safety, leaped aboard the barge to assist the injured man.  He quickly got him to his feet and aboard CG-41439, where he treated him and the other four survivors. When a second explosion occurred, Petty Officer SHERWOOD used his body to shelter his patients from the flying debris and then examined the wounds sustained by one of his own crewmembers. He tended to the survivors’ wounds and their immediate needs until the boat reached Northeast Harbor, where medical authorities were waiting. Petty Officer SHERWOOD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Baker, Brian P., Bowen, Robert A., Dupuis, Paul J., and James, Carol A.)


SHIRAI, Thomas T., Seaman Recruit, USCG

Date of Action:  28 February 1984
Date of Award:  04 May 1984

Seaman Recruit SHIRAI is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 28 February 1984 while serving as a search and rescue watchstander at Coast Guard Station Sheboygan, Wisconsin. After receiving a report of a woman in the water outside of the Sheboygan North Breakwall, Seaman Recruit SHIRAI and his fellow watchstanders rushed to the scene. The woman was floating on the surface of the water some forty feet from the breakwall. At great personal danger to himself, Seaman Recruit SHIRAI swam to the aid of the victim and carried her back to the breakwall. He then waited until a wave crested, at which time he was able to lift the woman and pass her to other Coast Guard and police personnel who were assisting. It was only through the heroic and unselfish efforts of Seaman Recruit SHIRAI that the woman’s life was saved. Seaman Recruit SHIRAI demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


SIEBRANDS, Alda,   Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  05 March 1994
Date of Award:  17 September 1994

Citation not on file. 


SIMMONS, Gregory Charles, Aviation Electronics Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  31 March 1973
Date of Award:  19 July 1973

Petty Officer SIMMONS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 31 March 1973 while serving as Sea Air Rotary Wing Evacuation Team (SARWET) aircrewman of Coast Guard HH-52A 1409 helicopter during the rescue of a 12-year old girl who had been trapped beneath a cabin cruiser which had capsized in heavy seas and high winds while attempting to return to McAvoy Harbor in Suisun Bay near Port Chicago, California.  The helicopter was diverted from a patrol flight to assist and upon arrival on-scene was advised that a young girl had been trapped for over two hours inside the overturned boat’s cabin.  After evaluation of the sea and wind conditions, Petty Officer SIMMONS was deployed to the scene and made several attempts to dive under the boat but was unsuccessful due to the buoyancy in his wet suit and the amount of freeboard underwater.  The helicopter then attempted, unsuccessfully, to tow the boat to shallow water. As concern mounted for the girl’s safety, the helicopter’s copilot entered the cold water, secured assistance from a nearby pleasure boat, and set up a towline between the boat and the capsized vessel, which finally resulted in the righting of the cruiser.  Petty Officer SIMMONS located the young girl entangled in lines and debris and caught beneath the steering wheel of the boat.  Assisted by the copilot, he freed the girl through the broken windows of the now upright cabin cruiser, and after her head was supported began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until free breathing was restored.  Once the girl was revived, she was transferred to a Coast Guard boat for delivery to medical authorities.  Petty Officer SIMMONS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring during the exhausting hour and a half in the water during his rescue mission, which resulted in saving the girl’s life. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SINCLAIR, Terry William, Lieutenant Junior Grade, USCG

Date of Action:  12 April 1970
Date of Award:  27 October 1970

Lieutenant SINCLAIR is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 12 April 1970 as copilot of Coast Guard HH-52A 1386 helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of a survivor from an aircraft crash in the surf near Point Ano Nueva, California. Upon reaching an area 250 yards offshore, the survivor was sighted in the water. Although hampered by 6 to 8-foot seas and 10 to 12-foot waves, which prevented water landing, the helicopter was maneuvered into a hover over the helpless victim, and Lieutenant SINCLAIR was lowered inside the rescue basket. Upon reaching the unconscious man with remarkable effort, Lieutenant SINCLAIR succeeded in securing him into the basket.  While the critically injured man was safely hoisted aboard the helicopter and flown to safety, Lieutenant SINCLAIR remained in the water. Lieutenant SINCLAIR was later retrieved by the helicopter.  His outstanding initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger were constantly demonstrated throughout this mission.  Lieutenant SINCLAIR’s unselfish actions, remarkable courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SINK, Rusty L., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  10 May 2003
Date of Award:  15 August 2003 

Petty Officer SINK is cited for heroism during the rescue of an 80-year old woman from her completely submerged automobile in the Cape Fear River near Southport, NC, on the morning of 10 May 2003.  As the woman attempted to park her car by a wharf, the brakes failed, causing the vehicle to plunge over the edge and into the water.  The car immediately sank beneath the surface where she was trapped inside and unable to escape.  Petty Officer SINK and two other crewmembers had just departed an adjacent pier for a Homeland Security patrol when they heard a loud crash behind them.  Just as they looked over their shoulders, a call came over the marine band radio notifying them of the incident.  They immediately turned around and moored the small boat.  Petty Officer SINK and one other crewmember, without the aid of additional rescue gear, quickly entered the water and created an ad hoc plan to extricate the woman from the vehicle.  They made repeated free dives, courageously attempting to remove her from the car.  After several unsuccessful attempts to open the car, they finally managed to force the driver's side door ajar.  With zero visibility in the murky water, Petty Officer SINK decided it was too dangerous to swim into the car to unlatch the seat belt.  On his next ascent for air, he obtained a knife from a bystander and handed it to his crewmember, who cut her free from the seat belt.  She was unconscious as she floated to the roof of the car.  After several more dives, Petty Officer SINK and his fellow crewmember finally pulled her out of the vehicle and to the surface.  They then towed her in a swimmers carry position to the pier where she was provided life saving first aid that eventually revived her.  Petty Officer SINK demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Carawan, Jacob)


SKARVOLD, Gary Lee, Engineman Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  02 December 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of December 2, 1967 while serving at the Coast Guard Station, Neah Bay, Washington, when he assisted in the perilous rescue of a fellow Coastguardsman from the treacherous waters of Neah Bay and assisted in averting the destruction of the CG-44364, which had been set adrift by violent waves. Petty Officer SKARVOLD, advised that a fellow Coastguardsman had been washed off the pier by a large wave, donned a wet suit and accompanied by another member of the crew, entered the frigid water to assist. Despite hazards of almost total darkness, 15 to 20-foot waves, and floating debris, the rescuers reached the distressed man and attempted to pull him to shore. Thwarted in this plan by the waves and treacherous currents, the rescuers remained with the victim until a fishing boat picked them up. Later that morning when the CG-44364 was set adrift in the bay, Petty Officer SKARVOLD immediately volunteered to be lowered from a helicopter hovering at an altitude of 40 feet to the surging deck of the CG 44364 to assist in taking the CG-44364 in tow for mooring in sheltered waters. Petty Officer SKARVOLD demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Eichhorn, Charles S.)


SMITH, Mark Anthony, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  20 January 1975
Date of Award:  16 April 1975

Seaman SMITH is cited for heroism on the morning of 20 January 1975 while serving aboard USCGC ANVIL (WLIC-642) when he rescued a drowning man from the surging tide waters in Miami Harbor at Meloy Channel Bridge, Miami, Florida. While working on the bridge of the ship, Seaman SMITH observed the man splashing in the water just north of the bridge and hastily proceeded up the sea wall of Causeway Island to investigate. Hearing the victim’s cries for help, Seaman SMITH quickly evaluated the drowning man’s dilemma and determined a means of rescue of the foundering man. Due to the swift running tide and long swim, Seaman SMITH realized he would need assistance in saving the victim. Hastily returning to the ship, he seized a life ring, and with his shipmates following closely, returned to the distress scene and dived into the water. Swimming as rapidly as he could while towing the life ring, Seaman SMITH kept his eyes steadily on the victim who was in a state of panic and had disappeared and resurfaced several times. Within minutes he arrived at the victim’s side and cautiously extended the life ring, staying clear of the man’s frantic grasping. When the man had calmed sufficiently, Seaman SMITH moved closer and assisted in placing the life ring over the victim’s head and under his arms. Throughout the water rescue, Seaman SMITH talked with the victim, reassuring and relaxing him, while waiting for assistance. Shortly thereafter, a Coast Guard rescue boat arrived on scene and both men, completely exhausted, were pulled from the water and ferried to safety. Seaman SMITH demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout the rescue. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty were instrumental in saving a life and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SMITH, Stephen R.,   Boatswains Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  04 July 1980
Date of Award:  02 February 1981

Citation not on file. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Harshfield, Richard A. [1st award], Johnson, Robert W. Michael, William R., Terrell, Bruce W., and Larue, Joe S.)


SMYTHE, Albert E., II, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  18 August 1990
Date of Award:  23 May 1991

Citation not on file. 


SNIDER, Kenneth J., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  22 December 1973
Date of Award:  30 May 1975

Seaman SNIDER is cited for heroism on the night of 22 December 1973 while serving as a crew member of Coast Guard Utility Boat 40420, assigned to the U.S. Coast Guard Station, Port Isabel, Texas when he rescued a drowning crewman from the sinking fishing vessel ORIENTAL CLIPPER off the entrance jetties to Brazos Santiago Pass, Texas. The man was one of three crew members of the ill-fated fishing vessel which struck the jetty on Boca Chica during a storm and began sinking. Two of the crew reached the relative safety of the jetties, the third crewman had climbed the mast seeking safety. As soon as the distress message was received, CG-40420 was dispatched to assist. Upon arrival on scene, Seaman SNIDER saw the crew member slip from his precarious perch on the mast of the stricken vessel, fall into the cold water, and disappear. Realizing the man’s plight and that the coxswain could not maneuver the boat close enough to rescue the man, Seaman SNIDER immediately dived into the swirling waters and swam toward the area where the man had submerged. Despite six to eight-foot seas, cold air and water temperatures, 20-knot winds, and oil from the wreck which caused momentary blindness, Seaman SNIDER struggled on in his attempt to reach the survivor, who had surfaced again. Finding his tending line was not long enough, Seaman SNIDER without hesitation cast off his safety line and was able to reach the drowning man and pull him to the Coast Guard boat where both were safely pulled aboard. Seaman SNIDER’s initiative, fortitude and daring, in spite of imminent personal danger, resulted in saving the man’s life. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


SOLAND, James G., Lieutenant Junior Grade, USCG

Date of Action:  10-22 February 1972
Date of Award:  20 June 1972

Citation not on file.  

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Azevedo, George A. and Iness, Robert A.)


STEVENS, Elmer Allen, Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  23 June 1964
Date of Award:  20 May 1965

For heroism, on June 23, 1964, while serving as coxswain of CG-44303, when he rescued four persons and a shipmate from drowning on the Umpqua River bar, Winchester Bay, Oregon. STEVENS and his crew, on bar patrol at the time, safely escorted 25 fishing skiffs across the hazardous bar. However, five skiffs remained trapped outside the bar. The accident occurred when one of these boats was struck by a 30 foot breaker and capsized, throwing the occupants into the surf. Simultaneously, the CG-44303 was caught by a huge breaker and rolled 170 degrees, throwing a crew member overboard.  As soon as the CG-44303 righted herself, STEVENS skillfully maneuvered the boat to recover his shipmate and the four persons in the water. The survivors of the skiff were then transported to shore for medical care.  Thereafter, STEVENS returned across the Umpqua bar and, after taking the occupants aboard the CG-44303, he towed two more skiffs to shore.  By his perseverance, a total of 85 persons were assisted to safety, without serious casualty or injury. STEVENS demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and great ability in spite of ever present personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


STINSON, Joseph O., Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  10 July 1977
Date of Award:  23 December 1977

Petty Officer STINSON is cited for extraordinary heroism on the morning of 10 July 1977 while serving on board USCGC WESTWIND (WAGB-281), when he rescued a shipmate from drowning in the frigid waters of North Star Bay, Thule Air Force Base, Greenland.  Petty Officer STINSON was on deck when he observed a distraught shipmate jump from the flight deck into the icy water. Immediately alerting other crewmembers, Petty Officer STINSON, without regard for his personal safety, then jumped into the water and swam to the foundering man. Upon reaching him, Petty Officer STINSON supported him while swimming to a life ring which had been thrown into the water.  He then towed the hapless man to a ladder which had been rigged from the ship, and assisted the victim in climbing to safety.  Throughout the rescue, Petty Officer STINSON gave verbal encouragement and instructions to the man. Petty Officer STINSON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


STITZER, Dennis E., Boatswains Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  1 June 1968
Date of Award:  15 August 1968

For heroism on the afternoon of June 1, 1968 while serving as coxswain of the CG 52313, engaged in the perilous rescue of three men from the capsized pleasure craft MISS KISS at Grays Harbor Entrance, Westport, Washington.  Petty Officer STITZER, observing the 24-foot MISS KISS being overturned by a breaker and her occupants thrown into the turbulent water on the Grays Harbor Bar, skillfully maneuvered the CG 52313 toward the survivors.  Steering his vessel alongside two of the persons found clinging together, he directed his crew to pass life rings.  Despite constantly breaking surf up to 20 feet high which violently tossed the survivors and the rescue boat, both person in the water were held alongside by members of his crew until the efforts of all hands were successful in pulling them to safety.  A third survivor was located floating 300 yards ahead of the boat and was assisted alongside where he clung to the lifeline on the hull.  Petty Officer STITZER, recognizing the exhausted condition of his crew and despite a severely cut right eye, reached over the side of the boat and with his crewmen holding his feet pulled the man almost single-handedly aboard the CG 52313.  Petty Officer STITZER demonstrated initiative, fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish action and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 


SULLIVAN, Shawn D., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Official Citation PDF Icon


SWANK, William R., Boatswains Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  18-19 December 1978
Date of Award:  14 May 1980

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Kleuskens, Jeffrey A., Vennie, Mark L., and Weaver, Charles C.)


SWANSON, Shane W., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


SZEROKMAN, James F., Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action:  05 August 1984
Date of Award: 12 December 1984

Chief Warrant Officer SZEROKMAN is cited for heroism on the evening of 5 August 1984 when he saved the life of a drowning teenage boy in Lake Washington, Seattle, Washington.  As the Seafair Hydroplane Races concluded, hundreds of boats which had been moored within viewing distance of the races began to exit through the narrow channel at the east end of the Mercer Island Bridge.  Chief Warrant Officer SZEROKMAN, who was on liberty at the time and among those exiting through the narrow channel, observed the dangerous conditions: several minor collisions, the free-for-all attitude of most boat operators, and people in numerous small canoes and rafts in the middle of the channel.  Realizing some kind of emergency was inevitable, he decided to remain nearby to render assistance.  A large yacht passed within inches of a canoe causing a teenage boy, who was wearing no personal flotation device, to fall overboard. Chief Warrant Officer SZEROKMAN immediately maneuvered his boat against the flow of boat traffic to the vicinity of the canoe until he sighted the boy, floating face down, 18 inches under the water.  After positioning his boat, and without regard to the imminent personal danger, he jumped into the water and pulled the unconscious boy to the surface.  At one point, he had to release the boy and fend off a passing vessel that did not see them.  After getting the boy into his boat he immediately began CPR. A Coast Guard 41-foot utility boat arrived with emergency medical technicians who subsequently revived the young man, and he was then evacuated to a nearby hospital by Coast Guard Helicopter. The heroic actions of Chief Warrant Officer SZEROKMAN resulted in the saving and complete recovery of the teenager.  Chief Warrant Officer SZEROKMAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


SZYDLOWSKI, Frank Frederick, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1966
Date of Award:  14 April 1967

For heroism on the evening of October 30, 1966 while serving as a crew member of the CG-40581, engaged in the perilous rescue of three persons from the tug VINDEX, which was grounded in the heavy seas off Three Mile Harbor, East Hampton, Long Island, New York.  The CG-40581 was enroute to Montauk Coast Guard Station when a signal light was sighted on the tug.  All attempts to maneuver alongside the VINDEX were thwarted by the heavy eight to ten foot seas, shallow water, and gale-force winds gusting to 58 miles per hour.  The CG-40581 then proceeded into Three Mile Harbor to attempt a rescue from the beach. Seaman SZYDLOWSKI immediately donned a wet suit and entered the pounding surf to swim to the stranded boat.  Despite darkness, turbulent seas, and being adjacent to dangerous breakwater conditions, he reached the VINDEX and located the three frightened men, cold and suffering from exposure.  He quickly insured that they were properly fitted into life preservers and then guided them in swimming through the violent breakers and seas to the safety of the shore.  Seaman SZYDLOWSKI demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


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