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U.S. Coast Guard Awards


Coast Guard Medal
Award Citations, D-F


DAVIDSON, Gregg A., Health Services Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  11 December 1993
Date of Award:  01 April 1994 

Citation not on file.


DAVIS, George T., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12 November 1981  
Date of Award:  11 March 1982

Petty Officer DAVIS is cited for heroism on 12 November 1981 while serving as a crewman of the rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHI) from USCGC ALERT [WMEC-630].  On 11 and 12 November 1981 ALERT steamed through an intense storm to reach the sailing vessel HALCYON.  The HALCYON had been beset by heavy seas and high winds while sailing 200 miles off the coast of North Carolina.  By the time ALERT arrived the wind was over 50 knots and the seas were breaking at 30 feet.  Despite these impossible conditions, Petty Officer DAVIS volunteered to serve as a crewman of the small boat in an attempt to rescue the HALCYON’s sole occupant.  After the RHI was launched, Petty Officer DAVIS assisted the coxswain in locating HALCYON in the turbulent seas.  As the RHI was lined up for its approach to the foundering sailboat, a huge sea capsized and sank HALCYON, throwing the occupant into the sea and nearly capsizing the RHI.  Reacting immediately, the coxswain maneuvered the RHI into position so that Petty Officer DAVIS and the other crewman could pull the survivor to safety.  As the coxswain positioned the RHI next to the wildly tossing ALERT, Petty Officer DAVIS helped secure the RHI alongside the cutter so it could be hoisted onto the cutter.  ALERT then proceeded to the scene of the sailing vessel OUR WAY, arriving on the night of 12 November.  Petty Officer DAVIS again volunteered to serve as crewman of the RHI.  The RHI was again launched and maneuvered away from ALERT to the side of the best OUR WAY.  Upon arrival, the lone occupant was found fatigued to near incoherence.  Aside from the difficulties of operating in the heavy seas, Petty Officer DAVIS and the crew had to convince the man to leave his boat.  Once convinced, the man had to be physically assisted into the RHI.  The RHI was returned to ALERT where it was hoisted to safety. Petty Officer DAVIS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish action, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brereton, Richard J. and McDougle, Cameron E.)  


DAVIES, Ronald Judge, Lieutenant Junior Grade, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966 

For heroic conduct on April 8, 1966 while serving on board the USCGC COOK INLET [WHEC-384] when he boarded the burning and abandoned Norwegian passenger vessel VIKING PRINCESS in search for 40 missing survivors.  When advised of the disaster, the COOK INLET departed Guantanamo Bay to assist the Norwegian ship, afire in the vicinity of Windward Passage.  Upon arrival, finding the ship burning violently and apparently abandoned, Lieutenant (Junior Grade) DAVIES promptly volunteered as member of a boarding party to search the vessel for survivors.  Despite dense smoke and heat so intense that patches of paint on the outside were bursting into flame, he boarded and assisted in searching all accessible spaces above and below decks, including the infirmary area and crew quarters.  The boarding party remained aboard the flaming hulk for more than 20 minutes, executing a vigorous search until ascertaining that there was practically no chance that any living survivor remained aboard the VIKING PRINCESS. Thereafter, when warned that the fire was advancing under them on the lower decks, the boarding party withdrew.  Lieutenant (Junior Grade) DAVIES demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the Untied States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Barnes, Robert S., Buechler, Albert C., Disnmore, Robertson P., and O’Keefe, William)


DELZELL, George A., Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  29 May 1974  
Date of Award:  04 November 1975

Seaman DELZELL is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 29 May 1974 while serving aboard CG-40461, a Coast Guard utility boat assigned to Coast Guard Group, New Orleans, when he rescued a 38-year old man from drowning in the treacherous currents of the Mississippi River at New Orleans, Louisiana.  The utility boat had been directed to the scene in response to a call concerning an attempted suicide at the Hess Terminal. Upon arrival on scene, Seaman DELZELL observed a man in the water clinging to the barge with one hand and holding a knife with the other. Skillfully using a boat hook, Seaman DELZELL disarmed the man and then attempted to pull him into the utility boat. However, the man struggled frantically to escape, broke free, and disappeared beneath the surface of the water. Without hesitation, Seaman DELZELL immediately jumped into the treacherous currents of the Mississippi River in an attempt to locate the man and was instantly swept underneath the rake of the barge. In the turbulent waters beneath the barge, Seaman DELZELL finally located the victim and succeeded in bringing him to the surface. The man continued his struggle to escape and extricate himself from Seaman DELZELL’s grasp, but to no avail, as he was held fast until the CG-40461 was maneuvered alongside to provide assistance in the rescue. During the ensuring 30 minutes the crew of the CG-40461 worked diligently, encountering great difficulty due to the extremely emotional state of the victim, before they finally succeeded in subduing him and getting him aboard the utility boat. During the entire period, Seaman DELZELL managed to keep the struggling man afloat and his head out of the water. Seaman DELZELL demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent danger in this rescue mission. His unselfish action, and unwavering devotion to duty were instrumental in saving a life and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


DE MARCO, Robert James, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 July 1964
Date of Award:  30 September 1965

For heroism on July 25, 1964, while serving as coxswain of the CG-30460, when he assisted in the rescue of 15 survivors of the stranded fishing boat MARLIN, which was breaking up on the rocks of the Cape May Inlet West Jetty. DeMARCO, then a Seaman, was on Cape May Inlet Patrol when he observed the MARLIN drifting toward the rock jetty. After advising Cape May Station of the situation, he proceeded to the scene. Upon arrival, he found the MARLIN was stranded on the rocks and her occupants drifting helplessly in the rough waters. Despite high seas and strong winds DeMARCO skillfully maneuvered his boat close to the windward side of the jetty and, with the aid of crew member, rescued three persons who were in imminent danger of being thrown against the rocks. He then proceeded to the lee side of the jetty and rescued four more survivors. After all survivors had been recovered from the water and from the jetty, he followed another Coast Guard rescue boat to the dock with the survivors. DeMarco demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger, during the rescue. His courageous actions contributed to the saving of the lives of the survivors. DeMARCO’s unselfishness and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bucci, Phillip R., Evans, Russell R., and Talbot, John P.)  


DENHAM, Levi R., Boatswain's Mate Third Class, USCG  (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  24 November 2000
Date of Award:  20 February 2001

Petty Officer DENHAM is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 24 November 2000 during the daring rescue of a woman from her burning mobile home.  While on liberty on Thanksgiving night, Petty Officer DENHAM was in his yard when he noticed smoke and flames coming from his neighbor's home.  Without hesitation, Petty Officer DENHAM told his wife to call the fire department as he rushed to the scene.  He arrived within seconds and while assessing the situation, heard a dog whimpering from inside.  Not knowing what was inside, Petty Officer DENHAM proceeded to kick in the door allowing the dog to escape.  With the trailer engulfed in smoke, Petty Officer DENHAM disregarded his own safety to see if anyone was inside.  He courageously wrapped his shirt around his face and crawled inside the home to look for survivors.  As he made his way along the living room floor in almost zero visibility, he came across a woman on the couch.  He immediately pulled her out of the home and administered first aid to the breathing, but incoherent woman until emergency services personnel arrived.  Undaunted by his ordeal, Petty Officer DENHAM then began to fight the fire with a garden hose in a valiant effort to save the family's home.  Petty Officer DENHAM demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


DEWEY, Charles M., Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  27 March 1973
Date of Award:  08 July 1974 

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Geck, Jack E.)  


DINSMORE, Robertson P., Commander, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966 

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Barnes, Robert S., Buechler, Albert C., Davies, Ronald J., Johnson, John E., and O’Keefe, William)


DIXON, Richard D., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  03 July 1980
Date of Award:  02 February 1981

Official Citation PDF Icon

(Related Coast Guard Medal Citation: Langlois, George R.)  


DIXON, Russell Bernard, Jr., Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 March 1965
Date of Award:  26 October 1965

For heroism on March 25, 1965 while serving aboard the CG-44324 when he assisted in the rescue of two persons from peril on Bodega Rock in Bodega Bay, California. The CG-44324 was dispatched from Bodega Bay Station and upon arrival on the scene located two men, one injured, stranded on a the rock with 12 foot seas and 30 knot winds buffeting them. The men, who were the only survivors of a capsized outboard boat, had been washed onto the rock and were unable to help themselves due to shock and exposure. DIXON and another Coast Guardsman, dressed in wet suits, immediately jumped from the CG-44324 and swam 30 yards through heavy surf to Bodega Rock with lifejackets for the survivors. With the assistance of a civilian swimmer, DIXON then swam from Bodega Rock back to the CG-44324 towing the injured man on a rubber mattress. The man was then transferred to the USCGC CAPE HEDGE [WPB-95311]and subsequently to shore for medical treatment.  DIXON demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Note: Robert F. Lange, a civilian, was awarded the Silver Lifesaving Medal for his part in this rescue)


DOLLOFF, James O., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  13 March 1978
Date of Award:  31 July 1978

Petty Officer DOLLOFF is cited for heroism on the morning of 13 March 1978 while engaged in fire fighting activities on board USCGC RED WOOD [WLM-685] near Groton, Connecticut.  While performing his routine duties, Petty Officer DOLLOFF heard general quarters sounded and immediately proceeded to his billet as investigator for the fire fighting party.  After donning his oxygen-breathing-apparatus he hurried to the scene of the fire.  Upon arrival, he found that intense heat and blinding black smoke had forced the watchstanders out of the engine room before they were able to energize the ship’s fire pump.  Realizing that the fire could not be fought without charge hoses, Petty Officer DOLLOFF joined the engine room Chief Petty Officer, and, with complete disregard for his own safety, crawled into the engine room.  Unable to see because of the smoke, the two men used their sense of touch and memory of the engine room to locate the switch and energize the fire pump.  This action enabled the crew of RED WOOD to quickly extinguish the fire, thereby preventing further damage to the ship. Petty Officer DOLLOFF demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and daring in spite of the imminent personal danger during this ordeal.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Marshall, William C.)  


D’ORNELLAS, John C., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  21 November 1980
Date of Award:  28 August 1981

Seaman D’ORNELLAS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 21 November 1980 while engaged in the rescue of the operator of a foundering fishing vessel during a serve storm, 10 miles west of the Umpqua River Bar, Oregon. Seaman D’ORNELLAS was a crewman on Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat 44303 dispatched from Coast Guard Station Umpqua River. The MLB arrived on scene after a punishing ride through a breaking bar, 20-foot seas and 50-knot winds. The operator and only occupant of the fishing vessel reported that his auto pilot had failed, his forward hatch cover had been displaced by seas breaking over the bow, and he was taking on water. He further stated that his vessel was listing due to a broken stabilizer pole, and that the listing had worsened due to flooding through the forward hatch. He stated that he was unable to leave the helm to receive a pump due to auto pilot failure. After numerous futile attempts by a Coast Guard helicopter to hoist a Coast Guardsman aboard, Seaman D’ORNELLAS volunteered to leap from the MLB to assist the hapless operator. Seaman D’ORNELLAS went forward to the bow of the MLB and maintained position there, enduring many breaking seas for nearly 30 minutes while the coxswain fought to reach a position form which a successful jump could be made. Following the dangerous leap to the violently pitching and rolling fishing vessel, Seaman D’ORNELLAS reassured the operator and went forward to secure the loose hatch cover. Once again he was engulfed by numerous breaking seas which, on several occasions, swept him completely off his feet and forced him to grasp any available object to remain aboard. The raging sea washed three pumps that were delivered by helicopter overboard before they could be secured. The forward hatch was again blown off and Seaman D’ORNELLAS endured the battering sea to secure it. After the vessel suffered several 90-degree rolls, breaking windows in the wheelhouse and the antenna which severed communication, Seaman D’ORNELLAS persuaded the operator of the fishing vessel to abandon ship with him into the turbulent ocean where they were picked up by the MLB. Seaman D’ORNELLAS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.  


DUDLEY, Morgan, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  22 July 1993
Date of Award:  26 August 1994

Official Citation PDF Icon


DUFFY, James, Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  22 August 1994
Date of Award:  21 December 1994 

Citation not on file. 

(Related citations: Beatty, Lawrence and Merriam, Jamison)


DUKE, Angus C., Hospital Corpsman First Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  17 March 1971
Date of Award:  29 June 1971

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Forster, Mark H., Grigsby, Danny L., and Rehberg, John C.  In addition, Gold Lifesaving Medals were awarded to Alton A. Edlund, Charles G. Mack, and Eston L. White, civilians, for their respective roles in this rescue.)  


DUNCAN, John E., Boatswain's Mate Third Class, USCG
(Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action: 25 February 2007
Date of Award: 12 June 2007

Official Citation PDF Icon


DUNNING, Michael, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  03 October 1994  
Date of Award:  21 December 1994 

Petty Officer DUNNING is cited for heroism on 3 October 1994 while serving as a crew member aboard the Coast Guard Utility Boat (UTB) CG41342, while engaged in the daring rescue of two victims from the pleasure craft DOORMAT which had capsized in four-foot seas near Montauk Point, Long Island, New York.  Displaying professionalism and superior judgment, Petty Officer DUNNING saved a struggling woman, trapped under the capsized vessel and her husband, who was clinging to the overturned hull.  Upon arriving at the scene, the crew of CG41342 approached the man in the water to assist him.  However, with his wife trapped in a small air pocket in the submerged cabin, he repeatedly refused to leave the water.  The UTB crew learned that in addition to being trapped, the victim was unable to swim and tangled in the lines and debris surrounding the pleasure craft.  The rescue efforts were severely affected by rapidly deteriorating weather and the victims' increasing vulnerability to hypothermia and shock.  Moreover, the air supply of the victim trapped in the hull was quickly diminishing.  Grasping the gravity of the situation, Petty Officer DUNNING acted quickly by donning on a rescue swimmer harness and plunging into the water to save the trapped victim.  After clearing the debris surrounding the hull and making several exploratory dives, he dove and swam down and up into the cabin.  Surfacing in the air pocket inside the hull, he calmed the trapped victim, removed the tangled lines, and led her out of the capsized boat to safety.  Petty Officer DUNNING demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


DUPUIS, Paul J., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  30 August 1991
Date of Award:  09 October 1991

Petty Officer DUPUIS is cited for heroism on the night of 30 August 1991 while serving as coxswain of Utility Boat CG-41439.  During this period Petty Officer DUPUIS was engaged in maintaining a safety zone around a barge being used as a platform for fireworks display at Northeast Harbor, Maine. During the display, sparks from the launched fireworks ignited stockpiled pyrotechnics on the deck of barge, resulting in a tremendous explosion. The explosion forced three persons into the water; another person was apparently unconscious and was ablaze, and a fifth person remained on the barge, sheltered behind a 55-gallong drum. Petty Officer DUPUIS quickly and skillfully maneuvered the Utility Boat alongside the barge so his crewmembers could begin applying water to numerous fires on the deck, recover the three persons in the water, and attend to the two persons who remained on the barge. With the survivors safely onboard, Petty Officer DUPUIS began backing the Utility Boat away from the barge when a second, more powerful explosion occurred, scattering burning debris and shrapnel in all directions.  The force of the explosion disabled the boat’s radar and cabin lights, dislodged the radio and clock from their mounting brackets, and filled the cabin’s interior with smoke.  Maintaining control of his damaged boat, Petty Officer DUPUIS successfully transported the five survivors to Northeast Harbor, where medical authorities were waiting.  Petty Officer DUPUIS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Baker, Brian P., Bowen, Robert A., James, Carol A., and Sherwood, Bruce E.)  


DUREN, David N., Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

FIRST AWARD

Date of Action:  01 February 1979
Date of Award:  12 October 1979 

Chief Petty Officer DUREN is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 1 February 1979 when he assisted in the rescue of two men from drowning in the treacherous surf off the Siletz River Bar, Oregon. Shortly after crossing the bar into the Pacific Ocean, the 24-foot dory the two men were in began to break up. After transmitting a Mayday, they were forced to abandon the vessel. Upon notification of the sinking, Chief Petty Officer DUREN, Officer-in-Charge of U.S. Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, Oregon, and one of his crew loaded the station’s rubber Zodiac on a trailer and hastily proceeded to the scene. Chief Petty Officer DUREN then assisted in launching the Zodiac into the shallow water of Siletz Bay. Following directions from the beach party on a portable radio, the Zodiac was skillfully maneuvered through three lines of breaking eight-foot surf to the debris from the battered dory. The cold and exhausted men were quickly located and recovered from the water. While the victims were being pulled on board, the Zodiac’s motor stopped. As the Zodiac drifted at the mercy of the relentless breakers, several attempts were made to start the motor. After several anxious moments, the motor was restarted and the little craft was maneuvered back through the pounding surf to the beach where the victims were transferred to an awaiting ambulance. Chief Petty Officer DUREN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: 1st award to Edwards, Dave)

SECOND AWARD

Date of Action:  26 November 1980
Date of Award: 
14 May 1981

Chief Petty Officer DUREN is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 26 November 1980. During this period he was engaged in the rescue of three boys from Fogarty Creek, Fogarty Creek State Park, Oregon. The boys had become stranded on an offshore rock by high tide in the creek. Upon notification that the boys were in danger, Chief Petty Officer DUREN, Officer-in-Charge of the Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, Oregon, organized a team of rescue swimmers to assist the boys. When the swimmers approached the rock with a rescue line, the oldest boy dived from the rock and Chief Petty Officer DUREN coaxed him through the foaming surf to the beach. He then directed the rescue of the other two boys and assisted in hauling them ashore as the surf conditions continued to worsen. As he was hauling the last boy ashore it was apparent that the rescue swimmers were tiring rapidly. Pulling the last boy to safety, Chief Petty Officer DUREN directed the nearest rescue swimmer to return to the rock to assist the other swimmer who was now exhausted from fighting the surf. However, the two swimmers were forced apart when a pounding breaker tore the swimmer from the rock and swept him toward open water. Without hesitation, Chief Petty Officer DUREN entered the frigid water, despite not having a wet suit, and swam through the treacherous surf to the now helpless swimmer. Reaching the man, Chief Petty Officer DUREN towed him back through the surf to the beach. Chief Petty Officer DUREN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


ECKROTH, Mark L., Machinery Technician Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  13 April 1979
Date of Award:  21 June 1979

Petty Officer ECKROTH is cited for extraordinary heroism on the night of 13 April 1979 when he assisted in the rescue of an unconscious fisherman from the surf at Bird Rock, Bodega Bay, California. The fishing vessel CAMMELEA had grounded in 8 to 10-foot seas with 25-knot winds pounding her hard against the rocks near Bird Rock. Earlier, Petty Officer ECKROTH, as boat coxswain, and a shipmate from Coast Guard Station Bodega Bay, had used a Sonoma County, California Sheriff’s Department 16-foot Boston Whaler to deliver an interpreter to Bird Rock in an effort to communicate with the fishermen on board CAMMELEA, and had then taken up a position offshore with a Coast Guard motor lifeboat. Upon notification by a Sheriff’s Department helicopter than one of the fishermen had been washed overboard and was afloat near the northern tip of Bird Rock, Petty Officer ECKROTH immediately, and with complete disregard for his own safety, maneuvered the Boston Whaler into the heavy surf to rescue the helpless man. When the helicopter was forced to land before reaching the man, Petty Officer ECKROTH, without hesitation, continued to maneuver among the rocks with only a flashlight to illuminate the area until the man was sighted. He then brought he Boston Whaler alongside so that his shipmate could pull the man aboard. With the unconscious man safely on board, Petty Officer ECKROTH guided the rescue craft back through the rocks toward open water. Once clear of the rocks, he turned the helm over to his shipmate and commenced cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the fisherman. While still in heavy seas, the engine of the Boston Whaler died, requiring the Coast Guard motor lifeboat to take it in tow. Due to the heavy seas, the victim could not be transferred to the motor lifeboat. Therefore, Petty Officer ECKROTH continued CPR for 45-minutes until the man was transferred to paramedics at Station Bodega Bay. Petty Officer ECKROTH demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Toavs, Ina J.)  


EDMONSON, Michael J., Aviation Electronics Technician Second Class, USGC

Date of Action:  04 September 1983
Date of Award:  29 November 1983

Petty Officer EDMONSON is cited for heroism on the morning of 4 September 1983 as radioman of Coast Guard helicopter HH-3F 1437. The helicopter departed form Air Station Kodiak with a medical team onboard and flew to Cape Ugat, Alaska to search for the fishing vessel PARKS 15 which was reported to be sinking with four persons onboard. Floating in rough, frigid water and wearing only light clothing and PFD’s, two of the vessel’s crew were found alive but incapacitated due to hypothermia while the remaining two crew members were floating face down. Exhibiting exceptional coordination and teamwork, three successful platform pickups were accomplished with Petty Officer EDMONSON and the flight mechanic pulling the people into the aircraft. A fourth platform pickup was impossible due to the close proximity of the victim to the distressed vessel, so Petty Officer EDMONSON volunteered to enter the water to free the entangled man and place him in the rescue basket. Donning a survival suit and securing a trail line around his waist, Petty Officer EDMONSON was towed by the helicopter to the lifeless victim. He cut the man free with great difficulty, and placed him in the rescue basket. After the victim was recovered, Petty Officer EDMONSON was hoisted aboard the helicopter. He then assisted the medical team with giving CPR to the two unconscious victims. One of these, a 3 year-old girl who had been floating face down, was revived just prior to the helicopter’ arrival at Kodiak. The 50 year-old operator who Petty Officer EDMONSON had risked his life to save could not be revived and was pronounced dead at the hospital. Petty Officer EDMONSON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and extreme daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United Sates Coast Guard.


EDWARDS, Dave, Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG  

FIRST AWARD

Date of Action:  01 February 1979
Date of Award:  12 October 1979

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: 1st award to Duren, David N.)

SECOND AWARD  

Date of Action:  11 July 1979
Date of Award:  18 February 1980

Petty Officer EDWARDS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 11 July 1979 when he rescued a young girl from drowning in the turbulent surf off Fogarty Creek State Park, Oregon. When notified that several persons were caught in the surf, Petty Officer EDWARDS, Officer of the Day at Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, Oregon, organized a beach rescue party consisting of two other Coast Guardsmen and himself. Upon arriving at the scene, they discovered that all of the persons were safely ashore except for one girl who was foundering approximately 100-yards offshore in the midst of dangerously sharp rocks and pounding breakers. Reacting immediately, Petty Officer EDWARDS and a fellow Coast Guardsman plunged into the violent surf and fought their way through the continuous rows of breakers against the heavy undertow. Upon reaching the now unconscious girl, Petty Officer EDWARDS initiated mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while struggling to keep himself and the girl afloat. As he started toward the beach, the other Coast Guardsman assisted him in fighting through the merciless breakers to a Zodiac that had been towed halfway from the beach by other persons. Petty Officer EDWARDS lifted the girl into the Zodiac and continued mouth-to-mouth resuscitation as the boat was towed to the beach. Reaching the beach, the helpless girl was turned over to an awaiting ambulance crew for treatment for hypothermia. Petty Officer EDWARDS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


EICHHORN, Charles Skylar, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  02 December 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968

For heroism on the morning of December 2, 1967 while serving at the Coast Guard Station, Neah Bay, Washington, when he assisted in the perilous rescue of a fellow Coastguardsman from the treacherous waters of Neah Bay. Seaman EICHHORN, advised that a fellow Coastguardsman had been washed off the pier by a large wave while attempting to reach an endangered boat, immediately donned a wet suit and a life preserver and, with another Coastguardsman, entered the frigid water to assist. Despite hazards of almost total darkness, 15 to 20-foot waves, and floating debris, the rescuers reached the distressed man and attempted to pull him to shore. Thwarted in this plan by the waves and treacherous currents, the rescuers remained with the victim until a fishing boat picked them up. Seaman EICHHORN demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Skarvold, Gary L.)


ELLINWOOD, Fred G., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  31 July 1974
Date of Award:  26 June 1975

Petty Officer ELLINWOOD is cited for heroism on the morning of 31 July 1974 while serving aboard the Atlantic Strike Team, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, when he assisted in the rescue of survivors following the crash of a Navy aircraft into the upholstery shop, inhabited by 23 employees, on U.S. Coast Guard Air Base, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Petty Officer ELLINWOOD was present in the upholstery shop when the Navy aircraft sustained a mechanical malfunction during take-off and suddenly crashed into the side of the building, throwing all occupants to the floor. An explosion occurred, and a raging fire immediately engulfed the building, creating havoc in the almost totally demolished shop. After initially leaving the building, and despite the intensity of the raging fire, Petty Officer ELLINWOOD, without hesitation or regard for his own personal safety, reentered the building to offer needed assistance in the search for survivors. Although the room was filled with dense smoke and noxious and toxic fumes, and small explosions were occurring in the vicinity of the aircraft, he remained in the room and assisted in freeing a critically injured employee. The man, located underneath the left wing of the aircraft entangled in a sewing machine bench, was removed form the wreckage. During the evacuation procedure, Petty Officer ELLINWOOD recognized that the man had stopped breathing and immediately began administering cardiac massage while another Coast Guardsman administered  mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. He remained at the victim’s side until arrival of medical personnel.  Petty Officer ELLINWOOD’s remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and bravery, in spite of imminent personal danger through the mission, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Stated Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brunke, Ralph J., Burrus, Melvin D., and Farmer, Larry E.)  


ENDICOTT, Keith L., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  11 September 1989  
Date of Award:  26 July 1990

Petty Officer ENDICOTT is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 11 September 1989 while serving as coxswain of Coast Guard Surf Rescue Boat (SRB) 30612 during the rescue of seven survivors from the pleasure boat NONNIE’S PAPA. The vessel had capsized in 10 to 15-foot surf while entering Barnegat Inlet. Arriving on scene, Petty Officer ENDICOTT found several people in the water and others clinging to the vessel’s overturned hull. Unable to come alongside the hulk to rescue a man, woman, and child due to the surf crashing on a shoal, Petty Officer ENDICOTT relinquished the helm to his engineer and jumped into the water. Disregarding his own safety, he swam to the victims, pulled them through the surf to his boat, and began cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the unconscious woman. When she failed to respond, he rushed the victims to waiting medical help ashore, and despite his ordeal, returned to the accident scene. Skillfully maneuvering his boat in the raging surf, he then remained alongside NONNA’S PAPA to support and recover the rescue swimmers and divers searching the capsized boat for other survivors. Petty Officer ENDICOTT demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: McDonald, Daniel C.  In addition, a Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Robert J. Gilrain, a civilian; and a Silver Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Seaman Kevin S. Shurtleff, USCG, for their roles in this rescue. )  


EPPERT, Jack Louis, Electrician’s Mate Third Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  13 September 1971
Date of Award:  30 November 1971

Petty Officer EPPERT is cited for heroism on the night of 13 September 1971 as coxswain of Coast Guard skiff CG-121505 engaged in the perilous rescue of six victims of the Perkiomen Creek flood in Montgomery County near Lower Indian Head Road in Oaks, Pennsylvania. Petty Officer EPPERT immediately volunteered as coxswain and accompanied by another Coast Guardsman hurried to the scene where heavy rains had caused flash flooding of the creek to an estimated 15 to 18 feet above normal with currents of 10 to 15-knots. Upon arrival he launched a skiff from a truck and skillfully maneuvered through the flood waters, around trees and live power cables, to a house where four people were trapped on the rooftop and two more were stranded in trees. Despite darkness, with only a flashlight and candles held by the victims, Petty Officer EPPERT and his companion rescued three persons and took them to safety.  They quickly returned to remove the two remaining victims from the roof along with a man found in a tree behind the house. Enroute to shore the outboard motor failed and the boat broached in the rushing waters and was swept into a telephone pole. The five occupants were thrown into the cold water and struggled to remain with the boat for three hours.  During this time Petty Officer EPPERT aided and comforted the victims and kept signaling for assistance with a flashlight until help arrived.  Petty Officer EPPERT demonstrated unusual initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire mission.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Reynolds, James D.  A Silver Lifesaving Medal was also awarded to Lawrence M. Spedden, a civilian, for his role in this rescue)


EVANS, Russell Rexer, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG  

Date of Action:  25 July 1964
Date of Award:  30 September 1965

For heroism on July 25, 1964, while serving as coxswain of the CG-40566, when he assisted in the rescue of 15 survivors of the stranded fishing boat MARLIN, which was breaking up on the rocks of the Cape May Inlet West Jetty. EVANS, when advised of the accident, immediately proceeded to the scene, assumed control of the situation and organized the rescue efforts in a most efficient and professional manner. Despite extremely rough seas and strong winds, he skillfully maneuvered the boat close to the rock jetty and with the aid of his crew members rescued 15 survivors in a minimum of time. Through EVANS’ outstanding  seamanship and a highly coordinated rescue effort, not a single occupant of the MARLIN was lost. After all survivors had been recovered from the water and the jetty, first aid was rendered enroute to shore. EVANS demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger during his rescue. His courageous actions contributed to the saving of the lives of the survivors. EVANS’ unselfishness and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bucci, Phillip R., DeMarco, Robert J., and Talbot, John P.)


FARMER, Larry E., Aviation Survivalman First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  31 July 1974
Date of Award:  26 June 1975

Petty Officer FARMER is cited for heroism on 31 July 1974 while serving as the Survival Equipment Specialist aboard the Aircraft Repair and Supply Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, when he assisted in the rescue of survivors and in the fire fighting operations following the crash of a Navy aircraft into a building inhabited by 23 employees.  Petty Officer FARMER was working in the upholstery shop, on an aircraft overhaul problem, when the Navy aircraft sustained a mechanical malfunction during take-off and suddenly crashed into the side of the building, throwing the occupants to the floor.  An explosion occurred and a raging fire immediately engulfed the building, creating havoc in the almost totally demolished shop. Despite the hazardous threat of a disastrous jet fuel fire and numerous chemical explosions, Petty Officer FARMER heroically began searching through the dense smoke and wreckage for one man who was reported missing. Following a second explosion, and with complete disregard for the great personal danger of being trapped in the holocaust, Petty Officer FARMER courageously struggled through the dense smoke and fire and miraculously located the missing man, seriously injured and unable to move. He remained at the victim’s side until help arrived to assist in evacuating him to safety.  Although suffering from smoke inhalation and exhaustion, Petty Officer FARMER unhesitatingly returned to the blazing scene to search for other survivors, and when advised that all personnel from his shop were safe, quickly directed his efforts to fighting the fire. He remained in the center of activity until the holocaust was finally contained. Petty Officer FARMER’s remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring, in spite of imminent personal danger throughout this rescue mission, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brunke, Ralph J., Burrus, Melvin D., and Ellinwood, Fred G.)


FESKE, Robin, Aviation Survivalman First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 January 2000
Date of Award:  12 June 2000 

Citation not on file.


FILSINGER, Gary Dene, Engineman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1964
Date of Award:  20 May 1965

For heroism, on August 30, 1964, while serving a crew member of the CG-36455, when he unhesitatingly entered the surging surf, with breakers 20 to 30 feet high, to rescue seven survivors of the charter boat BELUGA, which had capsized on Siuslaw River Bar, Florence, Oregon. When advised of the accident, FILSINGER manned the lifeboat and proceeded to the scene where all occupants of the demolished BELUGA were located foundering in the surf, approximately one-half mile from shore. The CC-36455 was skillfully maneuvered into the immediate vicinity of the survivors and one man was pulled aboard safely. However, when the coxswain of the CG-36455 saw that the boat was endangering the lives of the persons in the surf, FILSINGER volunteered to enter the water. He immediately jumped into the 30-foot breakers and assisted six struggling survivors in their efforts to reach the safety of the shore. FILSINGER demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger, during this rescue. His courageous actions most certainly contributed to the saving of the lives of the survivors. FILSINGERS’s unselfishness and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Boswell, Richard B. and Hardin, Eldon C.)


FISCH, Kenneth L., Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  25 May 1987
Date of Award:  05 August 1987

Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH is cited for heroism while serving as Officer-in-Charge, USCGC POINT CARREW (WPB 82374) during two successive rescues in the Pacific Ocean off the California Coast on 25 May 1987. Responding to a distress signal from a sailing vessel with a broken rudder, Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH placed one of his crewmembers aboard the foundering vessel to take it in tow. Although the rescue was complicated by 15- to 20-foot following seas and wind gusts of more than 50 knots, Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH skillfully navigated a hazardous harbor entrance in heavy traffic and safely moored the sailing vessel. An hour later, despite extreme fatigue, he recalled his crews to assist a 22-foot vessel foundering in 20- to 25-foot seas. Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH skillfully coordinated the launch and subsequent retrieval of POINT CARREW’s smallboat, even as whitewater broke over the POINT CARREW’s mast. As darkness fell, the distressed vessel began to take on water and break up. Undaunted, Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH initiated a rendezvous with a nearby tug and barge and brought the endangered vessel alongside for a risky transfer of it s crew. As the rescue progressed, the vessels surged apart, causing a boy to fall into the turbulent water. Instantaneously, the POINT CARREW rolled severely, enabling a crewman to lean into the water, grab the boy, and pull him to the rail. The boy was brought aboard seconds before the vessels slammed together in the heavy seas. Although several injuries were sustained, everyone was safely rescued. Master Chief Petty Officer FISCH’s courage, professionalism, superb shiphandling, and his extraordinary leadership resulted in the successful handing of these two daring rescues under extremely hazardous weather conditions. He demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent danger. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Hohl, Clifford F. and MacLennan, Craig E.)


FLORES, William R., Seaman Apprentice, USCG (Posthumous award)

Date of Action:  28 January 1980
Date of Award:  16 September 2000

Seaman Apprentice FLORES is cited for heroism on the evening of 28 January 1980 while serving onboard U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BLACKTHORN.  Immediately after the collision between SS CAPRICORN and USCGC BLACKTHORN near the entrance to Tampa Bay, Florida, BLACKTHORN rolled to port and capsized before the ship's personnel could prepare for an orderly abandon ship.  Exhibiting composure beyond his shipboard experience, Seaman Apprentice FLORES joined another BLACKTHORN crewmember in making their way to the starboard lifejacket locker and commenced throwing lifejackets over the side to fellow crewmembers in the water.  Later, as the BLACKTHORN began to submerge and his companion abandoned ship, Seaman Apprentice FLORES remained behind to strap the lifejacket locker door open with his own belt thereby contributing to the survival of struggling shipmates who retrieved lifejackets as they floated to the surface.  Even after most of the crewmembers abandoned ship, Seaman Apprentice FLORES, with complete disregard for his own safety, remained on the inverted hull to assist trapped shipmates and provide aid and comfort to injured and disoriented shipmates.  His exceptional fortitude, remarkable initiative and courage throughout this tragic incident were instrumental in saving many lives and resulted in the sacrifice of his own life.  Seaman Apprentice FLORES' courage, selflessness and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


FOREMAN, William D., Aviation Survival Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  28 February 2004
Date of Award: 
13 September 2004

Petty Officer FOREMAN is cited for heroism while serving as a rescue swimmer on Coast Guard HH60J helicopter 6026 on 28 February 2004.  The aircrew was engaged in the night rescue of six persons from the M/V BOW MARINER that sank following an explosion of its 11,000 metric ton cargo of ethanol 50 miles east of Chincoteague, VA.  The horrific explosion cast the ship's 27 crewmembers into frigid 43-degree water covered with a lethal combination of ethanol and diesel fuel.  Understanding the ramifications of entering into the explosive environment, Petty Officer FOREMAN bravely volunteered to be hoisted down into the toxic water to affect the rescue of an unknown number of survivors in a damaged life raft.  Once inside the raft, Petty Officer FOREMAN with disciplined composure in this toxic environment, conducted a comprehensive survey of the scene and triaged the victims.  Realizing that the original plan to instruct the survivors on rescue basket operations would not work, Petty Officer FOREMAN made the courageous decision to remain on the raft to assist each survivor.  His confident, unhurried manner overcame the multiple obstacles of language, aircraft noise, and chemical contamination while he lifted the survivors from the raft into the cold water for further transfer into the rescue basket.  Disregarding his own personal welfare and experiencing extreme physical illness from the effects of prolonged exposure to the deadly chemicals and cold water, Petty Officer FOREMAN was able to execute the litter hoist of the last survivor.  Once back in the helicopter Petty Officer FOREMAN's focus remained on the mission.  At the hospital, before being admitted overnight for exposure, he was able to pass vital patient information to emergency room personnel in spite of his weakened state.  Petty Officer FOREMAN saved six lives.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Lee, Zee O.)


FORSTER, Mark Henry, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12 September 1971
Date of Award:  29 December 1971

Petty Officer FORSTER is cited for heroic conduct on the morning of 12 September 1971 while serving as Officer-in-Charge of the CG-253302, engaged in the perilous attempted rescue of seven persons from the waters of Coos Bay Entrance, Charleston, Oregon.  Petty Officer FORSTER skillfully maneuvered the CG-25302 into the heavy breaking surf to rescue the seven persons from two pleasure craft which had capsized in the 10- to 12-foot breaking seas along the Coos Bay South Jetty, but even with this gallant effort his boat was finally capsized by a 12-foot breaking swell. Upon surfacing alongside the CG-253302, Petty Officer FORSTER struggled to the keel and from this position, though pounded by the turbulent surf, maintained visual contact with the victims and direct approaching rescue boats to the survivors. When his capsized craft was being carried towards the rocks, Petty Officer FORSTER and his crewman swam to the Jetty and continued assisting the rescue boats in their efforts. Petty Officer FORSTER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in the spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue operation. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Duke, Angus C., Forster, Mark H., Grigsby, Danny L, and Rehberg, John C.  In addition, Gold Lifesaving Medals were awarded to Alton A. Edlund, Charles G. Mack, and Eston L. White, civilians, for their respective roles in this rescue)


FOSHAUG, Kenneth Martin, Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  31 August 1973
Date of Award:  08 April 1974

Petty Officer FOSHAUG is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 31 August 1973.  From Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay, engaged in the rescue of five persons form the surf when their pleasure craft capsized at the entrance of the Nehalem River, Oregon. While on routine bar patrol, Petty Officer FOSHAUG and the boat coxswain observed a pleasure craft founder and capsize on the bar and proceeded at once to assist. Arriving on scene one minute later, four persons were located in the frigid water, clinging desperately to their overturned craft. After determining that a small girl remained unaccounted for, the rescuers began scanning the area to see if the girl had been thrown clear of the boat. When their attention was diverted by cries for help which seemed to be coming from beneath the boat, Petty Officer FOSHAUG immediately entered the six-foot breaking surf and dived beneath the craft in search of the victim. Unsuccessful in his first attempt, he returned to the surface for air and then once again submerged to continue his quest. On this second attempt, Petty Officer FOSHAUG located the girl in an air pocket and after reassuring her, pulled her out from underneath the boat and brought her to the surface. The coxswain, who had been preoccupied by helping the other survivors to safety, then assisted the girl and Petty Officer FOSHAUG aboard the boat. Subsequently a line was put on the pleasure craft and it was towed clear of the surf until the tow was assumed by another Coast Guard boat. Petty Officer FOSHAUG demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger throughout this rescue mission. His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


FRANKS, Thomas J., Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


FRIDAY, Robert Garlon, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  26 May 1968
Date of Award: 
15 Aug 1968

For heroism on the morning of 26 May, 1968 while serving as crew member of the CG-44303, engaged in the perilous rescue of one survivor and the subsequent search for three other persons from the capsized pleasure craft YUM-YUM at Umpqua River Entrance, Winchester Bay, Oregon. Despite 35-knot winds and rough seas with 12- to 15-foot breakers which broke up the pleasure craft YUM-YUM. The CG-44303 proceeded to the scene and upon arrival sighted the bow section in the surf and a survivor about 75 feet away repeatedly going under the surface. As the CG-44303 was maneuvered alongside, surf broke over the decks and the victim disappeared under the port side. Seaman FRIDAY leaned far over the side of the boat on the down roll and, although at times completely submerged, helped to hold the survivor until he could be pulled to safety. Learning that three other persons had been aboard the demolished craft, the CG-44303 then commenced a search for the missing men while maneuvering in breaking swells for approximately 30 minutes, grounding once, frequently rolling broadside and repeatedly being engulfed by the surf. Seaman FRIDAY was constantly on the alert for the survivors and skillfully assisted in the recovery of two victims, one of whom he held with his legs while completely submerged by the breakers. Seaman FRIDAY demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: McAdams, Thomas D. and Rector, James H.)


FRYE, Steven R., Aviation Survivalman First Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  1 April 1991
Date of Award:
10 January 1992

Petty Office FRYE is cited for extraordinary heroism while serving as rescue swimmer aboard Coast Guard helicopter HH-3F CGNR 1484 on the evening of 1 April 1991. The aircrew was engaged in the perilous rescue of two men trapped at the base of jagged rock cliffs along the San Francisco coast. With no escape route and a rapidly rising tide, the survivors were swept into a rocky crevasse where they were being battered by eight to 10-foot breaking waves. In approaching darkness, Petty Officer FRYE was deployed from the helicopter into the dangerous seas. Immediately upon entering the water, he was swept into a rock crevasse near the survivors. He swam through the rocky coastline waters in heavy surf to reach the survivors, and despite sustaining injuries to himself while being driven into the rocks and under water numerous times, he continued to persevere. Upon reaching the victims, he quickly assessed their condition and prepared to transport one nearly lifeless survivor back through the surf to a position where he could be hoisted to safety. Fully aware of the risk involved and nearing physical exhaustion, Petty Office FRYE went on to complete the rescue of the second survivor. Petty Officer FRYE demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


FURTNEY, Kristopher G., Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Lieutenant FURTNEY is cited for heroism on 30 October 1991 while serving as a member of the rescue team on board CGC TAMAROA during the rescue of three people from the S/V SATORI and four survivors from an Air National Guard (ANG) H-60 helicopter in what became known as "The Perfect Storm.”  The ANG H-60 was forced to ditch because it could not refuel from a C-130 tanker due to the violent turbulence caused by the worst weather in more than 100 years. When a USCG H-3F helicopter could not hoist the ANG crew because the force of the wind was so strong the basket did not go down to the water, but went almost straight back into the tail rotor, the TAMAROA became their only hope.  As the seas towered above the bridge of the TAMAROA and weather buoys reported wave heights of 100 feet, Lieutenant FURTNEY was exposed to great personal risk as he demonstrated exceptional ship handling expertise for two hours by completing a shipboard pickup of four of the crewmembers of the ANG H-60.  By turning beam to the seas and using their power, the TAMAROA was able to approach the ANG crew, but at a cost of taking 55-degree rolls.  For the next 36 hours Lieutenant FURTNEY coordinated the Search and Rescue effort to locate the final crewmember of the ANG H-60.  Assuming tactical control of ten aircrafts, he masterfully planned and directed their effort to complete an extensive search and rescue operation, which covered more than 60,000 square miles of ocean.  The survivors of the ANG H-60 would certainly have died if Lieutenant FURTNEY had not demonstrated exceptional devotion to duty, supervised the personnel in his department who were stretched to limits of human endurance, and operated with little rest for a 72-hour period during the worst storm of the century.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brudnick, Lawrence; Capehart, Dennis G.; Cory, John R.; Franks, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Mark P.; Haddock, Martin T.; Huelle, James M.; Jackson, Robert D.; McGarigal, Sean; Merrell, Timothy M.; Moeller, William F.; Raras, Manuel R.; Scoggins, Joseph T.; Swanson, Shane W.; Sullivan, Shawn D.; Watson, Sean K.; and Woodell, David E. )


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