U.S. Coast Guard Awards


Coast Guard Medal
Award Citations, A-C


ADDISON, Ronald Clarence, Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  31 December 1968  
Date of Award:  16 May 1969 

For heroism on the morning of 31 December 1968 as a copilot of a Coast Guard HH-52A helicopter engaged in the rescue of a stranded hunter from Sand Island, near Bridal Veil, Oregon.  Blowing snow, 65-knot winds, poor visibility, and air temperatures near zero prevented a rescue by vessel or helicopter on the first day. On the second day, despite continuously severe weather, the aircraft hovered between 10 and 50 feet above the Columbia River and air taxied to the island navigating by spotting surface aids.  On the second pass, one man was sighted leaning against a tree with the other hunter in a prone position.  Lacking a clear area for the hoist in the vicinity of the victims, the helicopter maneuvered approximately 60 yards upwind and hovered while Lieutenant ADDISON was lowered to the ground.  While the pilot searched for a clearing, Lieutenant ADDISON was guided by hand signals from the crewman to the location and although severely handicapped by the bitter cold, ascertained that one man had died and one was suffering from extreme exposure and frostbite in both legs.  He then persevered and reassured the hunter while simultaneously helping him to a nearby clearing where both men were hoisted to safety.  Lieutenant ADDISON demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and courage in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish action and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


  AKANA, Paul Howard, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  11 June 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968 

For heroism on the morning of 11 June 1967, while serving as a volunteer swimmer from the Coast Guard Loran Station, Hawaii, engaged in the rescue of three survivors from a downed Cessna 172 which had crashed in the ocean approximately 500 yards off Upolu Point, Hawaii. The victims, two men and two women, although injured, had managed to climb out of the plane which sank immediately in 80 feet of water. When advised of the ditching and location of the plane, Seaman AKANA and four teammates dived into the choppy, shark-infested waters and swam out to rescue the survivors.  When the four occupants of the plane were located, one was unconscious, one was bleeding profusely from a head wound, and two other persons were in apparent shock.  The rescuers then began assisting the survivors back to shore where they were treated by Coast Guard personnel.  Despite Seaman AKANA’s valiant efforts in immediately rendering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the unconscious victim, the man succumbed to his injuries.  Seaman AKANA demonstrated initiative, fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bennett, George G., Crisler, Lynn T., Olsen, Robert D. and Pearce, Robert E.)  


ALESSANDRINI, John H., Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  25 May 1982
Date of Award:  18 October 1982 

Petty Officer ALESSANDRINI is cited for heroism on 25 May 1982 when he secured a towing hawser to the 186-foot M/V WESTPRO and assisted in the tow of a disabled boat with four persons on board to safety.  The WESTPRO was burning out of control and grounded on the east break wall of the Seward, Alaska boat harbor.  Following numerous explosions of dangerous chemicals that caused the evacuation of the north side of the City of Seward, Petty Officer ALESSANDRINI volunteered as coxswain of the small boat from USCGC CAPE JELLISON [WPB-95317].  As he brought the small boat alongside WESTPRO, his crewman secured the towing hawser to the burning ship and cut its anchor cable.  As CAPE JELLISON took WESTPRO in tow, Petty Officer ALESSANDRINI observed a disabled boat with four persons on board that was in danger of colliding with WESTPRO. With complete disregard for his own safety, Petty Officer ALESSANDRINI positioned the small boat so that a tow-line could be secured and the boat was towed to safety.  Petty Officer ALESSANDRINI demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude and seamanship throughout this incident.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Ray, Thomas A.)


AMBROSE, Arthur Loyal, Fireman, USCG  

Date of Action:  13 August 1967
Date of Award:  02 November 1967

For heroism on the afternoon of August 13, 1967 while serving as boat engineer on the CG-40462, engaged in the perilous rescue of four persons, two of whom were trapped inside a capsized pleasure craft, in the vicinity of Clatsop Spit on the Columbia River, Ilwaco, Washington.  The CG-40462, on safety patrol outside the bar, arrived within minutes, maneuvered alongside the overturned boat, rescued the two persons clinging to the top, and learned that two others were trapped inside.  Fireman AMBROSE unhesitatingly entered the 55o water in six-foot breaking swells.  When all attempts to right the boat failed, Fireman AMBROSE and another Coast Guardsman made repeated dives under the pleasure craft and, although hampered by entangling fish lines and fouled life preserves, removed the victims.  A man, suffering from shock, was placed in the rescue basket of a helicopter on-scene.  Fireman AMBROSE and his companion then returned and extricated a woman who had lost consciousness.  While awaiting the helicopter basket, Fireman AMBROSE began administering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the survivor. Fireman AMBROSE demonstrated initiative, fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His un-selfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Brott, Lindley D.)  


AN, David, Petty Officer; USCG

Date of Action:   25 November 2000
Date of Award:  13 October 2001

Petty Officer AN is cited for extraordinary heroism on 25 November 2000 while assigned to USCGC STORIS (WMEC 38) during the rescue of nine Coast Guardsmen from the Bering Sea.  As a law enforcement team from STORIS was being launched over the side in the motor surfboat, the ship's aft davit arm snapped and all nine sailors were dropped into the freezing seas.  Without hesitation, Petty Officer AN dressed out in rescue swimmer gear and plunged into the turbulent waters where he quickly brought order to a chaotic scene.  The boarding crew was scattered the length of the ship and the three-ton small boat was slamming into the hull amidst a tangle of wire rope and broken metal.  Petty Officer AN calmed one crewman who was succumbing to hypothermia and towed the stunned man through six-foot swells to the ship's well deck, where he was hoisted aboard.  In order to get another man who was foundering near the stern, Petty Officer AN, with complete disregard for his own safety, unclipped his safety harness in order to safely navigate the perilous swim around the capsized small boat.  This left him at the mercy of the sea, with no possible assistance from those on deck.  He swam to the drowning man and, displaying herculean strength, pulled him from danger.  Only after seeing all hands safely aboard did Petty Officer AN climb out of the arctic waters, where he then collapsed due to the exhaustion and exposure.  Petty Officer AN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


ANDERSON, Peter James, Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action:  29 April to 2 May 1969
Date of Award:  08 December 1969

Chief Warrant Officer (CWO2) ANDERSON is cited for heroic conduct during the period 29 April to 2 May 1969 while serving as acting engineering officer of USCGC COURAGEOUS [WMEC-622] engaged in fire fighting operations for the gasoline and naphtha-laden tanker MOBIL APEX in Limetree Bay, St. Croix, Virgin Islands. With total disregard for his own safety, Chief Warrant Officer ANDERSON voluntarily boarded the burning vessel for initial evaluation of the fire.  Internal explosions were occurring in the stern section of the MOBIL APEX every ten minutes and towering flames were pouring from the after superstructure and one cargo tank of naphtha.  Determining that fire fighting would be impossible at this time, plans were made to attempt the operation the next morning when he again boarded the blazing MOBIL APEX and heroically directed the extremely hazardous mission. Through his dedicated efforts he contributed significantly to saving the stricken tanker.  Chief Warrant Officer ANDERSON’s exemplary courage and unwavering devotion to duty in spite of imminent personal danger reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Helmer, George P. and Sanders, Charles H.)


ANGELILLO, Paul R., Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:   ? October 1994
Date of Award:  25 January 1995 

Citation not on file. 

(The following Coast Guardsmen also received the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” device for this rescue: CDR Michael M. Ashdown, SN John J. Conwell; BM1 Matthew Varhaug; and BM3 Bradley W. Venendall)


AUGUSTUS, Kenneth W., Master Chief Machinery Technician, USCG

Date of Action:  05 April 1976
Date of Award:  20 May 1976 

Master Chief Petty Officer AUGUSTUS is cited for heroism on the morning of 5 April 1976 while enroute from Juneau, Alaska to Ketchikan aboard a commercial airliner.  During the landing at Ketchikan, the jetliner overran the end of the runway, plummeted into a ravine, broke into several pieces, ruptured her fuel tanks, and burst into flames.  Before attempting to exit from the burning wreck, Master Chief Petty Officer AUGUSTUS, a member of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District Staff Inspection Team, freed a trapped and injured stewardess and assisted her to the forward cabin door.  After the stewardess had been lifted from the aircraft and carried to safety, he descended to the muskeg below, braced himself against the fuselage and assisted the escaping passengers while acting as a “human ladder.”  With total disregard for his personal safety, Master Chief Petty Officer AUGUSTUS courageously returned to the cockpit area of the aircraft in an attempt to rescue the trapped pilot, co-pilot and flight engineer.  Constantly faced with the threat of a devastating explosion, he none-the-less remained at the scene of the conflagration and rescued an elderly woman who was precariously hanging by her foot from an open door.  Undaunted, Master Chief Petty Officer AUGUSTUS again returned to the cockpit area and was thwarted in his attempts to gain access on the left side of the fuselage.  Without hesitation, he traversed under the nose of the burning plane to the right side where entry was once again thwarted.  In search of the necessary access equipment, he then proceeded up a nearby hillside to an airport crash truck.  The hapless crewmembers were subsequently rescued as additional assistance arrived on scene.  Master Chief Petty Officer AUGUSTUS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of grave personal danger during this aircraft disaster.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Bickford, William J.)


AZEVEDO, George Anthony, Chief Damage Controlman, USCG

Date of Action:  10 to 22 February 1972
Date of Award:  20 June 1972 

Chief Petty Officer AZEVEDO is cited for heroism in the performance of duty while serving aboard USCGC KLAMATH [WHEC-66] during the period 10 to 22 February 1972 engaged in rendering assistance to the Japanese freighter TENZAN MARU which was flooding and in danger of capsizing in the North Pacific Ocean, approximately 720 miles southwest of Kodiak, Alaska.  Disregarding his own safety, Chief Petty Officer AZEVEDO voluntarily boarded the distressed vessel and assisted in shoring and repairing the vessel throughout the 13-day period under hazardous conditions of flooding, shifting cargo, and the threat of complete structural failure.  His constant alertness was demonstrated when he observed a shipmate’s foot wedged between two timbers that were being scissored together by hull pressure.  With a tremendous display of strength, he lifted his shipmate free and prevented a severe injury or probable amputation.  On one occasion, Chief Petty Officer AZEVEDO entered the water in number two hold to patch holes and cracks resulting form shell plating separating from the frames.  Though Chief Petty Officer AZEVEDO was in constant personal danger, through his untiring efforts, perseverance, and outstanding professional abilities, critical repairs were accomplished in 15 to 20-foot seas and high winds, enabling the TENZAN MARU and her 34 crew members to reach San Francisco Bay without loss of life or further serious damage.  Chief Petty Officer AZEVEDO’s unselfish actions, remarkable courage, sound judgement, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Iness, Robert A. and Soland, James G.)


BAGBY, Marshall C.,  Machinery Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  28 July 1978
Date of Award:  28 March 1979 

Petty Officer BAGBY is cited for heroism on the night of 28 July 1978 when he rescued a woman from drowning in the pounding surf of Lake Erie at the Lorain, Ohio Harbor Outer Break wall.  Upon receipt of a distress call from a disabled pleasure craft, Petty Officer BAGBY was dispatched from Coast Guard Station Lorain as boat engineer of Coast Guard rescue boat CG-41391.  Arriving on scene, the pleasure craft was observed foundering on the break wall rocks.  Of the six persons on board, four had reached the relative safety of the break wall, one had disappeared in the breaking surf, and one woman remained in the water. Petty Officer BAGBY assisted in throwing a life ring to the woman, but the 20 to 30-mile per hour winds, darkness, and heavy seas prevented her form grasping it.  Realizing that the woman’s strength was waning, Petty Officer BAGBY, with complete disregard for his personal safety, immediately entered the water with a life ring and swam through the pounding 6 to 8-foot waves to her.  As he attempted to support the woman in the turbulent water, a large breaker tore the life ring from his grasp.  Successive waves drove Petty Officer BAGBY against the break wall rocks, as he maintained his hold on the woman until the boat was able to maneuver close enough to again pass a life ring to him.  After being pulled to safety, Petty Officer BAGBY, although near exhaustion, immediately commenced treating the woman for shock and later assisted in evacuating the remaining four survivors.  Petty Officer BAGBY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BAKER, Brian P., Port Securityman Third Class, USCGR

Date of Action:  30 August 1991
Date of Award:  ?? 

Petty Officer BAKER is cited for heroism on the night of 30 August 1991 while serving as a crewmember of Utility Boat CG-41439.  During this period, Petty Officer BAKER was engaged in maintaining a safety zone around a barge being used as a platform for a fireworks display at Northeast Harbor, Maine.  During the display, sparks from the launched fireworks ignited stockpiled pyrotechnics on the deck of the barge, resulting in a tremendous explosion.  The explosion forced three persons into the water; another person was apparently unconscious and was ablaze, and a fifth person, remained on the barge, sheltered behind a 55-gallon drum. Petty Officer BAKER immediately grabbed a heaving line to throw to the men in the water as CG-41439 maneuvered closer to the burning barge.  He successfully pulled one of the victims onto the small boat and then, without regard to his own safety, leaped onboard the still burning barge to assist in rescuing two persons and bringing them aboard CG-41439.  He then went to the bow of the boat and was manning the fire monitor when a second, more powerful explosion occurred.  Petty Officer BAKER was fully exposed to the blast and was thrown backwards onto the boat’s superstructure, sustaining burns and wounds to his legs and face, a laceration on his hand, and bruises to his body.  He remained alert and coherent as CG-41439 proceeded to Northeast Harbor where medical authorities were waiting.  Petty Officer BAKER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Bowen, Robert A., Dupuis, Paul J., James, Carol A., and Sherwood, Bruce E.)  


BARNES, Robert Stanley, Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966 

For heroic conduct on April 8, 1966, while serving on board the USCGC COOK INLET, [WHEC-384] when he boarded the burning and abandoned Norwegian passenger vessel VIKING PRINCESS to search for 40 missing survivors.  When advised of the disaster, the COOK INLET departed Guantanamo Bay to assist the Norwegian ship, afire in the vicinity of Windward Passage.  Upon arrival, finding the ship burning violently and apparently abandoned, BARNES promptly volunteered as a member of a boarding party to search the vessel for survivors.  Despite dense smoke and heat so intense that patches of paint on the outside were bursting into flame, he boarded and assisted in searching all accessible spaces above and below decks, including the infirmary areas and crew quarters.  The boarding party remained aboard the flaming hulk for more than 20 minutes, executing a vigorous search until ascertaining that there was practically no chance that any living survivor remained aboard the VIKING PRINCESS.  Thereafter, when warned that the fire was advancing under them along the lower decks, the boarding party withdrew. BARNES demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Buechler, Albert C. Davies, Ronald J., Dinsmore, Robertson P. , Johnson, John E.,  and O’Keefe, William)


BAUER, Wayne Marvin, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  20 January 1974
Date of Award:  08 July 1974 

Petty Officer BAUER is cited for heroism on the evening of 20 January 1974 while serving as coxswain of motor lifeboat CG-44331, assigned to Coast Guard Station Umpqua River at Winchester Bay, Oregon, engaged in the perilous rescue of three persons from the heavy-laden fishing vessel HOLMES which had attempted to cross the Umpqua Entrance Bar.  The HOLMES, one of five fishing vessels returning with a cargo of crabs, after waiting for a temporary calm, was entering the river when she was overtaken by a series of 10 to 12-foot breakers and rendered inoperative.  As the turbulent surf swung the fishing boat around to the south side of the South Jetty, she was slammed violently and repeatedly against the jetty and the cabin and steering gear were smashed.  The CG-44331 was on bar patrol because of the hazardous bar conditions when Petty Officer BAUER observed the HOLMES taking the large breaking sea and being veered sharply to starboard, ultimately crashing into the jetty.  Perceiving the imminent danger to the fishermen, he immediately proceeded through the breakers; skillfully maneuvered the 44-foot lifeboat through the jetty breakers alongside the crippled vessel; and returned to Umpqua Station with the survivors where they were treated for hypothermia and released without injuries.  Petty Officer BAUER’s initiative and courageous actions contributed to saving the lives of the three-man-crew.  His unselfishness and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BEACH, Eugene W.,

Date of Action:  05 December 1993
Date of Award:  01 April 1994 

Citation not on file.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Machovec, Kirk A., Montgomery, Tyrone M., and Rose, Christopher S. In addition, AE3 Thomas H. Parker, USCG, was awarded the Air Medal and BM2 Michael D. Warner, USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” device for their roles in this rescue).  


BEATTY, Lawrence, Seaman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  22 August 1994
Date of Award:  21 December 1994

Seaman BEATTY is cited for extraordinary heroism on the evening of 22 August 1994 while serving as a rescue swimmer aboard USCGC BAINBRIDGE ISLAND (WPB 1343), during the rescue of eight people from the sport fisher LYL SYN, which was sinking in a severe storm 30 miles east of the New Jersey shore.  Seven survivors were recovered clinging onto and in a small life raft.  Unfortunately, one person became separated from the raft after it was hit by a 15-foot breaking wave.  Seaman BEATTY voluntarily entered the mounting seas in pelting rain, darkness, and 50-knot winds to assist the victim in the water.  He swam 60 feet  to the imperiled victim and managed to bring him back alongside the cutter, when, without warning, the cutter had to back away to avoid a collision with an oncoming merchant ship, leaving the pair several hundred feet off the bow.  In the hazardous conditions, with no protection from the wind and seas, Seaman BEATTY displayed uncanny bravery and presence of mind to press on in spite of the elements, assisting the 270-pound victim by keeping his head above the water.  With BAINBRIDGE ISLAND rolling as much as 40 degrees in the breaking seas, Seaman BEATTY's attempts to get a line secured around the increasingly incapacitated victim proved unsuccessful.  When another large swell crashed into them, forcing both the rescuer and victim under the cutter, the two became separated.  In spite of the gallant efforts of Seaman BEATTY, the victim submerged for the final time, and was lost at sea.  Seaman BEATTY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Duffy, James and Merriam, Jamison)


BENNETT, George Gilbert, II, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  11 June 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968 

For heroism on the morning of June 11, 1967, while serving as a volunteer swimmer from the Coast Guard Loran Station, Hawaii, engaged in the rescue of three survivors from a downed Cessna 172 which had crashed in the ocean approximately 500 yards off Upolu Point, Hawaii. The victims, two men and two women, although injured, had managed to climb out of the plane which sank immediately in 80 feet of water. When advised of the ditching and location of the plane, Seaman BENNETT and four teammates dived into the choppy, shark-infested waters and swam out to rescue the survivors. When the four occupants of the plane were located, one was unconscious, one was bleeding profusely from a head wound, and two other persons were in apparent shock.  The rescuers then began assisting the survivors back to shore where they were treated by Coast Guard personnel.  Seaman BENNETT demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Akana, Paul H., Crisler, Lynn T., Olsen, Robert D., and Pearce, Robert E.)


BICKFORD, William J., Captain, USCG

Date of Action:  05 April 1976
Date of Award:  20 May 1976 

Captain BICKFORD is cited for heroism on the morning of 5 April 1976 while enroute from Juneau, Alaska to Ketchikan aboard a commercial airliner.  During the landing at Ketchikan, the jetliner overran the end of the runway, plummeted into a ravine, broke into several pieces, ruptured her fuel tanks and burst into flames. As a result of his extensive service as a Coast Guard aviator, Captain BICKFORD, serving as the Seventeenth Coast Guard District Staff Inspector, had the keen foresight to mentally pre-plan his escape. Thus, upon final impact and without hesitation, he began the exodus of passengers through the forward cabin door.  This effort was culminated by his assisting an injured stewardess from the burning aircraft and bodily carrying her across a stream of volatile jet fuel to a place of refuge.  After assuring himself of the safety of the others, Captain BICKFORD returned to the cockpit area of the burning wreck to aid another Coast Guardsman in an attempt to free the trapped flight deck crew.  Learning of possible survivors still remaining in the passenger cabin, Captain BICKFORD, his clothing soaked with fuel and with total disregard for his personal safety, courageously climbed back onto the wing and made a final search before leaving he aircraft.  He then proceeded up a nearby hillside and directed the awaiting airport firefighting crew into action.  This final decisive act undoubtedly retarded the spread of the conflagration sufficiently to permit others to successfully complete the rescue of the hapless flight deck drew prior to the aircraft becoming engulfed in flames.  Captain BICKFORD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of grave personal danger during this aircraft disaster.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Augustus, Kenneth W.)


BIRCHCREST, David Phillip, Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  19 February 1964
Date of Award:  12 March 1964

For Heroism on 19 February 1964, while serving as a volunteer swimmer aboard the USCGC COOS BAY [WHEC-376] engaged in the rescue of survivors from the foundering British merchant vessel AMBASSADOR, approximately 400 miles south southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Upon arrival of the COOS BAY at the scene, the Search and Rescue team was mustered.  BIRCHCREST immediately volunteered for swimmer duty as the COOS BAY was maneuvered in hazardous proximity to the AMBASSADOR.  The COOS BAY made approaches close aboard the stricken freighter, removing two men at a time, by hauling them on a line through the sea.  On one approach, a survivor was hauled to the embarkation net.  The man was completely exhausted from the ordeal and became hopelessly entangled in the net.  Three swimmers in the water at the net tried in vain to free him. BIRCHCREST, on deck, noticed the grave plight of the man and, without thought for his own safety, scrambled over the rail with a knife in his teeth.  Reaching the water, he cut the man free and secured a line to him.  The seaman was hauled aboard in an almost unconscious condition but resuscitative measures subsequently proved successful. BIRCHCREST demonstrated initiative, and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger during this rescue, and his actions most certainly saved the man’s life.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BITNER, Ira A., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCGR

Date of Action:  27 May 1974
Date of Award:  09 December 1974 

Petty Officer BITNER is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 27 May 1974 while serving at Coast Guard Station Execution Rocks in Long Island Sound, New York, engaged in the perilous rescue of two men from a small fishing boat which capsized, with three persons on board, on a shoal off the southwest end of Execution Rocks. Petty Officer BITNER, then a seaman, witnessed the accident; immediately alerted another watch stander of the catastrophe; launched the station small boat and skillfully proceeded to the scene through 25-knot winds and heavy 6-foot seas.  As he arrived on scene, he observed one of the three victims being washed away from the capsized vessel in the choppy seas.  Quickly throwing life preservers to the two men seen clinging to the overturned fishing boat, he maneuvered the station boat toward the third distressed man who disappeared beneath the water before he could reach him.  When his search of the immediate area proved futile, Petty Officer BITNER, cognizant of the debilitating effects of the elements on the other two victims, hastily returned to the capsized boat and single-handedly pulled the semiconscious men from the frigid water; transported them to shore, and then returned to the search area to continue his efforts.  Shortly thereafter other Coast Guard units and civilian units arrived on scene to join in the search for the missing victim.  Subsequently, Petty Officer BITNER was forced to return to the station, after an extended search, due to a dwindling fuel supply, an inoperative radio, and a cracked hull damaged by the force of the seas.  Petty Officer BITNER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue mission.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.


BOGGS, Roger Charles, Boatwain’s Mate Second Class, USGC (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  12 January 1966
Date of Award:  24 March 1966

For heroic conduct on January 12, 1966 while serving as coxswain of the motor surfboat of the USCGC ANDROSCOGGIN [ WHEC-68] engaged in rescuing 30 persons from the Greek Steamship LAMPSIS which flooded and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean. When the distressed ship radioed for help, the ANDROSCOGGIN immediately responded.  Upon arrival on the scene, communications with the LAMPSIS were established and the ANDRSCOGGIN stood by throughout the night.  At first light, a damage control party was placed aboard to assist in saving the ship.  All efforts were unavailing, however, and at dusk the damage control party returned to the ANDROSCOGGIN.  At 8 the next morning, the crew of the LAMPSIS signaled for assistance in abandoning ship.  BOGGS, designated coxswain of the motor surfboat, immediately made four trips to the LAMPSIS to remove survivors.  Although a heavy 20-foot swell and the darkness made boat handling and embarkation of the survivors a hazardous operation, and the language barrier and anxiety of the survivors added to the difficulties, BOGGS persevered in his duties and in 51 minutes successfully removed all 30 survivors without injury. BOGGS displayed outstanding courage, skill, and initiative during this rescue.  His unselfish actions, perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BOSLEY, David A., Boatswain’s Mate Second Class (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  12 February 1997
Date of Award:  18 February 1997

Petty Officer BOSLEY is cited for extraordinary heroism on 12 February 1997 while serving as a crew member aboard Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat 44363, attached to Coast Guard Station Quillayute River.  Shortly before 1 o’clock in the morning, responding to a distress call from the sailing vessel GALE RUNNER, Station Quillayute River launched two rescue boats.  The operator of GALE RUNNER reported that the vessel was dismasted, taking on water, and in danger of sinking, 2 miles south of the Quillayute River entrance.  Seas of up to 25 feet, combined with high winds and driving rain, created a situation of imminent danger for the two people aboard the GALE RUNNER.   Soon after crossing the treacherous bar in an attempt to reach the stricken sailboat, the motor lifeboat suddenly rolled over several times in the surf and confused seas.  As a result of the repeated roll-overs, Petty Officer BOSLEY was forcibly separated from his rescue craft and thrown into the churning ocean.  A Coast Guard HH-65 helicopter from Air Station Port Angeles was able to hoist to safety the two people from the GALE RUNNER as it crashed onto rocks. As a crew member of Coast Guard 44363, Petty Officer BOSLEY willingly entered extreme ocean storm conditions and sacrificed his life while attempting to save the lives of the two people from the GALE RUNNER.  Petty Officer BOSLEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Miniken, Clinton P., Schlimme, Matthew E., and Wingo, Benjamin F.  In addition, AM3 Neal W. Amos, USCG, was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his role in this rescue)


BOSS, Gerald Alexander, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  17 September 1967
Date of Award:  02 November 1967

For heroism on the afternoon of September 17, 1967 while serving as a crew member on board the CG-36495, engaged in the perilous rescue of four persons from a pleasure craft which capsized on the bar at Rogue River, Oregon.  Maintaining a safety patrol at the mouth of the river, CG-36495 arrived almost immediately and found two persons without life jackets clinging to the overturned boat.  Seaman BOSS unhesitatingly entered the 50o water, swam to the victims and assisted them to safety aboard the patrol vessel.  He then dived under the capsized boat which was being buffeted by a 4 to 8 foot breaking swells and rescued a man and a woman who were caught underneath the craft.  Seaman BOSS then supported the woman until all persons were retrieved by the crew of the CG-36495.  The survivors were then transported to medical facilities.  Seaman BOSS demonstrated initiative, fortitude and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United Sates Coast Guard.


BOSWELL, Richard Bruce, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1964
Date of Award:  20 May 1965

For heroism, on August 30, 1964, while serving as coxswain of the CG-38455 , engaged in the rescue of seven survivors of the charter boat DELUGA, which capsized on the Siuslaw River Bar, Florence, Oregon. BOSWELL, when advised of the accident, proceeded to the scene. He located all occupants of the DELUGA foundering in the raging surf, approximately one half mile form shore. The DELUGA had been completely demolished by a 30-foot breaker. BOSSWELL skillfully maneuvered the CG-38455, in breakers of 20 to 30 feet, into the immediate vicinity of the survivors.  However, after assisting one person aboard the CG-38455, he realized that the pitching and tossing boat was endangering the persons in the water. He immediately advised them to attempt to swim to the shore and directed his two crew members to assist them in the surf.  The exhausted persons in the water, aided by the Coast Guardsman, subsequently reached shore. BOSWELL demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Sates Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Filsinger, Gary D. and Hardin, Eldon C.)  


BOWEN, Robert A., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  30 August 1991
Date of Award:  09 October 1991

Seaman BOWEN is cited for heroism on the night of 30 August 1991 while serving as a crewmember of Utility Boat CG-41439.  During this period, Seaman Bowen was engaged in maintaining a security zone around a barge being used as a platform for a fireworks display at Northeast Harbor, Maine. During the display, sparks from the launched fireworks ignited stockpiled pyrotechnics o the deck of the barge, resulting in a tremendous explosion.  The explosion forced three persons into the water; another person was apparently knocked unconscious and set ablaze, and a fifth person remained on the barge, sheltered behind a 55-gallon drum.  Seaman BOWEN immediately manned the fire monitor at the boat’s bow as CG-41439 maneuvered closer to the burning barge. When within range of the barge, Seaman BOWEN applied water over the entire surface in an attempt to extinguish numerous deck fires, as well as the burning clothing of the unconscious man.  Once the flames subsided, he assisted another crewmember in retrieving the stokes litter and other medical equipment from the lower cabin.  Then, without regard to his own safety, he leaped onboard the still-burning barge to assist in rescuing two survivors and bringing them safely onto CG-41349.  When the Utility Boat arrived at Northeast Harbor, Seaman BOWEN assisted in transferring the survivors to medical authorities.  Seaman BOWEN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Baker, Bryan P., Dupuis, Paul J., James, Carol A., and Sherwood, Bruce E.)


BOYD, Lonnie J., Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  06 June 1993
Date of Award:  14 July 1995 

Citation not on file.

(Captain Max R. Miller, Jr., USCG, received the Meritorious Service Medal for his role in this rescue)


BOYD, Richard O., Fireman, USCG

Date of Action:  18 February 1978
Date of Award:  28 March 1979

Fireman BOYD is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 18 February 1978 when he rescued a man from drowning in the turbulent surf off Lone Ranch State Park, north of Brookings, Oregon.  Upon notification that a rubber Zodiac boat had been swept out to the breakers by a strong current and capsized, throwing the three occupants into the water, Fireman BOYD was dispatched from U.S. Coast Guard Station Chetco River as a member of beach party.  Arriving on scene, two of the men had reached shore with the help of bystanders.  The third victim was observed clinging to a rock in the breaking surf.  Realizing that the man was in a critical situation and could not hold out much longer, Fireman BOYD, with complete disregard for his personal safety, climbed out as far as possible on nearby rocks and then swam the last fifty-yards through the treacherous surf to the rock the man was holding on to.  Fireman BOYD then guided the man back through the surf to the beach even though the man was suffering from exposure and hypothermia and was unable to assist himself.  Fireman BOYD demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BRADLEY, Glenn A., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  24 August 1980
Date of Award:  14 January 1981 

Citation not on file.


BRERETON, Richard J., Jr., Chief Boatswain’s Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  12 November 1981
Date of Award:  11 March 1982

Chief Petty Officer BRERETON is cited for heroism on 12 November 1981 while serving as coxswain of the rigid-hull inflation boat (RHI) from USCGC ALERT [WMEC-630].  On 11 and 12 November 1981 ALERT steamed through an intense storm to reach the sailing vessel HALCYON.   The HALCYON had been beset by heavy seas and high winds while sailing 200 miles off the coast of North Carolina.   By the time ALERT arrived the wind was over 50 knots and the seas were breaking at 30 feet.   Despite these impossible conditions, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON volunteered to serve as coxswain of the small boat in an attempt to rescue the HALCYON’s sole occupant.  After the RHI was launched, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON skillfully maneuvered the boat away from the side of ALERT while the cutter pitched and rolled perilously close to the tiny craft.  Once clear of the cutter, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON exhibited exemplary seamanship in guiding the RHI to HALCYON.  As he was lining up for his approach to the foundering sailboat, a huge sea capsized and sank HALCYON, throwing the occupant into the sea and nearly capsizing the RHI.   Reacting immediately, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON maneuvered the RHI into position so that his two crewmen could pull the survivor to safety.  He then guided the RHI back to the wildly tossing ALERT and positioned it to be hoisted onto the cutter.  ALERT then proceeded to the scene of the sailing vessel OUR WAY.  Arriving on the night of 12 November, in worse conditions than experienced at the HALCYON, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON again volunteered to serve as coxswain of the RHI.  The RHI was again launched and Chief Petty Officer BRERETON maneuvered the boat away from ALERT to the side of the beset OUR WAY.  Upon arrival, the lone occupant was found to be fatigued to near incoherence.  Aside from the from the difficulties of operating in the heavy seas, Chief Petty Officer BRERETON and his crew had to convince the man to leave his boat.  Once convinced, the man had to be physically assisted into the RHI.  The RHI was returned to ALERT where it was hoisted to safety.  Chief Petty Officer BRERETON demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in the rescue.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal  citations: Davis, George T. and McDougal, Cameron E.)


BROCKMAN, Joseph Michael, Port Securityman Second Class, USCGR

Date of Action:  05 November 1972
Date of Award:  31 July 1973 

Petty Officer BROCKMAN is cited for heroism on the morning of 5 November 1972, while personally augmenting the United States Coast Guard Lifeboat Station located in Louisville, Kentucky, when he rescued a 32-year old woman from drowning in the swift waters of the Ohio River.  The woman had jumped from the 100-foot railing of the Clark Memorial Bridge and was in shock after submerging in the 38-degree water.  Petty Officer BROCKMAN, who was in the vicinity attending a Reserve meeting, heard the woman’s cries for help, investigated, and sighted her in the water.  Attempting to man a boat to go to her rescue and discovering that the boat was not operational, Petty Officer BROCKMAN immediately dived into the frigid waters of the rapid river current which was carrying the woman in the direction of the dam of the Ohio River.  Fighting the treacherous current, he skillfully proceeded toward the victim and, upon reaching her, effected a lifesaving carry as she was completely helpless.  By this time the swift current had carried Petty Officer BROCKMAN and the victim downstream to within 60 feet of the paddle wheel on the Belle of Louisville wharf boat.  As he struggled toward the boat, he was thrown a life ring and was assisted aboard with the nearly drowned woman.  The police arrived shortly thereafter and transported the victim to the hospital for medical treatment.  Petty Officer BROCKMAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue mission.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


BROTT, Lindley Dexter, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  13 August 1967
Date of Award:  02 November 1967

For heroism on the afternoon of August 13, 1967 while serving as crewman on board the CG-36554, engaged in the perilous rescue of two persons trapped inside a capsized pleasure craft, in the vicinity of Clatsop Spit on the Columbia River, Ilwaco, Washington. Immediately upon arrival on scene, Seaman BROTT was assigned to assist in the rescue and unhesitatingly entered the 55o water.  After all attempts to right the craft had proven unsuccessful, he and another Coast Guardsman made repeated dives under the craft and, despite entangling fish lines and fouled life preservers, removed the victims.  A man, suffering from shock, and a woman, who had lost consciousness, were then taken aboard a helicopter by rescue basket. Seaman BROTT demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Ambrose, Arthur L.)


BRUDNICKI, Lawrence, Commander, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


BRUNKE, Ralph J., Aviation Structural Mechanic Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  31 July 1974
Date of Award:  26 June 1975

Petty Officer BRUNKE is cited for heroism on 31 July 1974 while serving as turret operator aboard the crash truck of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, when he assisted in fire fighting operations following the crash of a Navy aircraft into a building inhabited by 23 employees.  The truck driver had the truck in motion when he observed the Navy aircraft leave the runway and swerve into the building. Petty Officer BRUNKE responded to the crash and, upon arrival on scene, despite difficulties with the equipment and inaccessibility of the fire source, delivered foam on the fire from close range.  Subsequently, when the foam supply was depleted, without regard for his own safety, he left the truck and entered the burning building to search for crew members of the aircraft.  He courageously walked through burning fuel and approached a hole in the fuselage to search for survivors before being driven out by flames, extreme heat, and noxious/toxic fumes.  Once outside, ignoring the very real threat of a catastrophic jet fuel explosion, Petty Officer BRUNKE took over as nozzleman on a 2-inch hose and led a crew into the burning structure in an attempt to reach the cockpit.  Shortly after entering the building, when the hosemen were overcome by smoke, Petty Officer BRUNKE was left alone on a wildly swinging hose, struck in the neck by the whipping nozzle, and knocked over an upholstery table into the edge of the fire.  He retreated from the area and was treated at the scene for a neck bruise, leg abrasions, and smoke inhalation.  Only when the hose was under control and being utilized by a new crew did he permit himself to be taken to an aid station for treatment.  Petty Officer BRUNKE’s remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and bravery, in spite of imminent personal danger throughout this rescue mission, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Burrus, Melvin D., Ellinwood, Fred G., and Farmer, Larry E. )


BRYAN, John Mac, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  17 August 1969
Date of Award:  24 December 1969

Seaman BRYAN is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 17 August 1969 while serving as crewman on the CG-36531, engaged in the perilous rescue of four men from a capsized pleasure craft on the Nehalem River Bar, Wheeler, Oregon.   After assisting in the rescue of two survivors, Seaman BRYAN, disregarding the dangerous turbulent surf, courageously attempted to save the two remaining survivors who were trapped beneath the boat.  Unable to free the men because of the heavy breakers, he remained with the capsized craft to reassure the trapped men while the current and seas carried them to the beach.   Although in constant danger of being crushed by the overturned boat in the pounding surf, Seaman BRYAN maintained his perilous vigil which resulted in the saving of two lives.  Seaman BRYAN demonstrated unusual initiative, exceptional fortitude, and heroic daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Hicks, Larry A.)


BUCCI, Philip Robert, Jr., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  25 July 1964
Date of Award:  30 September 1965

For heroism on July 25, 1964, while serving at the Cape May Station, when he assisted in the rescue of two survivors of the stranded fishing boat, MARLIN, which was breaking up on the rocks of the Cape May Inlet West Jetty.  BUCCI, when advised of the accident, assisted in getting the CG-40566 underway and then proceeded to the jetties to help.  Despite the fact that waves were continually breaking over the jetty and that the footing was treacherous because of the moss on the rocks, BUCCI and another seaman made their way along the entire length of the west jetty to reach two survivors who were clinging to the rocks. Disregarding his own safety, BUCCI assisted in bringing the woman survivor to a position of relative safety. Both seamen then entered the water and rescued the master of the MARLIN. Later, due to their perilous position on the rocks and the exhausted physical condition of the survivors, BUCCI and his companion each assisted a survivor in swimming a distance of approximately 100 yards through rough seas to the safety of a Coast Guard rescue boat, which was in the lee of the jetty. BUCCI demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: DeMarco, Robert J., Evans, Russell R., and Talbot, John P.)


BUECHLER, Albert Charles, Lieutenant, USCG

Date of Action:  08 April 1966
Date of Award:  09 June 1966

For heroic conduct on April 8, 1966 while serving on board the USCGC COOK INLET [WHEC-384], when he boarded the burning and abandoned Norwegian passenger vessel VIKING PRINCESS to search for 40 missing survivors.  When advised of the disaster, the COOK INLET departed Guantanamo Bay to assist the Norwegian ship, afire in the vicinity of Windward Passage.  Upon arrival, finding the ship burning violently and apparently abandoned, Lieutenant BUECHLER promptly volunteered as member of a boarding party to search the vessel for survivors. Despite dense smoke and head so intense that patches of paint on the outside were bursting into flame, he boarded and assisted in searching all accessible spaces above and below decks, including the infirmary area and crew quarters.  The boarding party remained aboard the hulk for more than 20 minutes, executing a vigorous search until ascertaining that there was practically no chance that any living survivor remained aboard the VIKING PRINCESS.  Thereafter, when warned that the fire was advancing under them on the lower decks, the boarding party withdrew.  Lieutenant BUECHLER demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire operation.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Barnes, Robert S., Dinsmore, Robertson P., Johnson, John E., and O’Keefe, William)


BURRUS, Melvin D., Aviation Machinist’s Mate Second Class

Date of Action:  31 July 1974
Date of Award:  26 June 1975

Petty Officer BURRUS is cited for heroism on 31 July 1974 while serving aboard the Aircraft Repair and Supply Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, when he assisted in the rescue of survivors and in the fire fighting operations following the crash of a Navy aircraft into a building inhabited by 23 employees.  Petty Officer BURRUS was working on a Coast Guard helicopter when he observed the Navy aircraft leave the runway and crash into the building approximately 100 yards away and burst into flames.  He immediately raced to the building and without hesitation entered the burning structure to search for survivors.  Despite the dense smoke, excessive heat, and the great possibility of an ensuring aircraft fuel explosion, Petty Officer BURRUS courageously searched the wreckage of the smoke-filled upholstery shop until he located one missing survivor.  He assisted in evacuating the seriously injured employee to a safe area and administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in a vain effort to revive him.  Upon arrival of medical personnel, Petty Officer BURRUS immediately returned to the blazing building to attempt to locate any other survivors, but his efforts to reenter the building were hindered by the tremendous heat and smoke of the raging fire. Undaunted, he took charge of a fire hose crew, moved to the front of the fire fighting activities, and aggressively directed a hose crew where fire-fighting efforts of his team contributed to controlling the blaze, thereby precluding a disastrous jet fuel explosion.  Although physically exhausted and suffering from smoke inhalation, Petty Officer BURRUS remained on scene and subsequently located and identified one of the victims.  Petty Officer BURRUS’ remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and bravery, in spite of imminent personal danger throughout this rescue mission, reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Brunke, Ralph J., Ellinwood, Fred G, and Farmer, Larry E.)


CADIGAN, John Joseph, Lieutenant Commander, USCG

Date of Action:  21 December 1964
Date of Award:  14 December 1965

For heroic conduct on December 21, 1964 while serving as boat officer of the pulling boat of the USCGC ROCKAWAY [WHEC-377] engaged in rescuing four persons from the SS SMITH VOYAGER, foundering in 20-foot seas, approximately 900 miles southeast of Bermuda.  When the distressed ship radioed for help, the ROCKAWAY immediately responded. Upon arrival on scene, shortly before sunset, a boat was launched by the crew of the ROCKAWAY with Lieutenant Commander CADIGAN (then Lieutenant) in charge of a volunteer boat crew.  With his expert skill, the boat was successfully maneuvered through 20 foot seas to a position approximately 25 feet from the derelict, whose main deck was now awash. The four survivors were then directed to jump into the water and, while grasping lines, were towed approximately 125 feet away from the ship, and assisted into the boat.  This method of recovery was necessary since the SS SMITH VOYAGER was constantly drifting down on the small boat.  After an hour and twenty minutes of continuous, extreme physical exertion, the boat was hoisted aboard the ROCKAWAY.  Lieutenant Commander CADIGAN displayed outstanding courage, skill, and initiative during this rescue operation.  His unselfish actions, perseverance, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


CAINES, James G., Aviation Survivalman Third Class (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  08 June 1997
Date of Award:  ??

Petty Officer CAINES is cited for heroism on the evening of 8 June 1997 while serving as rescue swimmer aboard Coast Guard HH-65-A helicopter, CGNR 6549.  The aircrew was engaged in the perilous rescue of five survivors from the Canadian-registered sailing vessel EZARA II which was disabled 57 miles west of Cape Mendocino, California. Two helicopters and the Coast Guard cutter USCGC EDISTO [WPB-1313] responded from Group/Air Station Humboldt Bay to a distress call from the sailboat.  A rudder casualty made the vessel difficult to control in turbulent conditions, which included 20-foot seas and winds of more than 45 knots.  With weather deteriorating and seas building to 25-feet and higher, the EZRA II was knocked down four or five times.  After the sailboat was hit broadside by a wave, knocking out cabin windows and causing injury to the crew, the master and crew of four abandoned their vessel and entered their life raft.  Helicopter 6549 arrived on scene with EDISTO and made preparations to approach the raft. During the helicopter's instrument-guided  approach to a hover, sight and communications were lost.  After immediate efforts to contact and locate the aircraft and its crew yielded no response, EDISTO maneuvered alongside the raft and was able to recover the crew of EZRA II.  As the rescue swimmer aboard the helicopter, Petty Officer CAINES willingly encountered extreme ocean storm conditions and sacrificed his life while attempting to save the lives of five persons from the disable sailing vessel.  Petty Officer CAINES demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Hughes, Richard L.)


CALLAHAN, Richard Ronald, Boatswain’s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  30 April 1967
Date of Award:  17 August 1967

For heroism on the evening of April 30, 1967 while engaged in searching for two teen-age boys reportedly stranded at the Duluth Entry North Breakwater Light, Minnesota.  Twin 16-year old boys and a brother had been seen running along the jetty challenging the 10 to 15-foot waves when witnesses observed a huge wave sweep one boy into the water. When two boys were reported stranded at the light, Petty Officer CALLAHAN and two comrades volunteered to attempt the rescue.  Lashing themselves together, the three men proceeded, with hand lanterns as the only illumination, to the end of the breakwater.  Despite the high waves, winds gusting to 40 knots, driving rain, and 36 degree water, the rescue party diligently searched the breakwater and light but found no trace of the boys.  While returning to the beach a 20-foot wave swept the lead man off the jetty nearly causing the loss of all three men.  Petty Officer CALLAHAN in attempting to retrieve his fellow Coastguardsman suffered a broken wrist and severe body bruises.  In spite of excruciating pain, through sheer determination, Petty Officer CALLAHAN and his companion managed to pull their teammate onto the beach, where all efforts to revive him failed.  Petty Officer CALLAHAN’s courage, unselfish actions, perseverance and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Culberston, Edgar A. and Prei, Ronald C.)  


CAMPBELL, Michael S., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  18 November 1972
Date of Award:  29 June 1973 

Citation not on file.


CAPEHART, Dennis G., Chief Warrant Officer, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Citation not on file.


CARAWAN, Jacob, Petty Officer First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  10 May 2003
Date of Award:  15 August 2003

Petty Officer CARAWAN is cited for heroism during the rescue of an 80-year old woman from her completely submerged automobile in the Cape Fear River near Southport, NC, on the morning of 10 May 2003.  As the woman attempted to park her car by a wharf, the brakes failed, causing the vehicle to plunge over the edge and into the water.  The car immediately sank beneath the surface where she was trapped inside and unable to escape.  Petty Officer CARAWAN and two other crewmembers had just departed an adjacent pier for a Homeland Security patrol when they heard a loud crash behind them.  Just as they looked over their shoulders, a call came over the marine band radio notifying them of the incident.  They immediately turned around and moored the small boat.  Petty Officer CARAWAN and one other crewmember without the aid of additional rescue gear, quickly entered the water and created an ad hoc plan to extricate the woman from the vehicle.  They made repeated free dives, courageously attempting to remove her from the car.  After several unsuccessful attempts to open the car, they finally managed to force the driver's side door ajar.  With zero visibility in the murky water, it was decided that it was too dangerous to swim into the car to unlatch the seat belt.  Petty Officer CARAWAN then took a knife provided by an onlooker, dove back down, and cut the shoulder and lap belts freeing the woman who floated unconscious to the roof of the car.  After several more dives, they finally pulled her out of the vehicle and to the surface.  Petty Officer CARAWAN assisted his fellow crewmember as they towed her in a swimmers carry position to the pier where she was provided life saving first aid that eventually revived her.  Petty Officer CARA WAN demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Sink, Rusty).  


CARIGNAN, James L., Seaman, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  03 June 1972
Date of Award:  19 December 1972 

Citation not on file.

A Coast Guard photo caption, dated 12 April 1973 regarding the acceptance of the posthumous award of the Coast Guard Medal by SA Carignan's parents, stated:

"Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred R. Carignan of Olympia accept the Coast Guard Medal for heroism from Rear Admiral Joseph J. McClelland, Commander of the 13th Coast Guard District.  The award was presented posthumously to their son James during a ceremony held at 13th District Headquarters today.  Carignan, at that time was a crewman aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Modoc, homeported at Coos Bay, Ore., was cited for his courage in sacrificing his own life in an attempt to save the life of a 12-year-old girl who was in danger of drowning in the turbulent surf off Charleston, Oregon on June 3, 1972.  He swam out into the eight-foot surf in an attempt to reach the drowning girl.  However, he became physically exhausted in the strong surf and heavy undertow and was unable to assist the girl or save himself.  In the words of the citation which was presented to his parents, "Seaman Carignan's exemplary courage, fortitude and intrepidity while sacrificing his own life, reflect the highest credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard."

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Nelson, Michael B. In addition, a Gold Lifesaving Medal was posthumously awarded to Betty R. Manock, a civilian, for her part in this rescue).  


CAROLA, Michael, Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  06 May 2000
Date of Award:  04 January 2001 (?)

Citation not on file.  A Coast Guard Press Release dated 29 September 2000 stated:

"While serving as rescue swimmer May 6, 2000, aboard a 47-foot motor lifeboat, Seaman Michael CAROLA, disregarding his own safety, went into the cold and turbulent waters of Oregon Inlet and placed his body between bridge piles and an 82-year-old man suffering from hypothermia to prevent the man from being pulled beneath the water. CAROLA held the 250-pound man up, keeping his head above water despite the force of the current and the man's inability to assist in his own rescue. As the boat crew struggled to pull them to safety, the exhausted victim told CAROLA that he was not going to survive and to let him go.  CAROLA, desperately trying to encourage him not to give up, was able to force a life ring over the victim's head and under his arms. Under CAROLA'S direction, the MLB pulled both of them to safety.  CAROLA swam the then-unconscious victim to the MLB, where he was immediately treated for hypothermia and transferred to an ambulance."


CARR, William B., Electronics Technician Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  13 August 1976
Date of Award:  07 November 1977

Petty Officer CARR is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 13 August 1976 while engaged in the perilous rescue of two people from drowning in the Atlantic Ocean at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina.  While on a beach outing with his family near the Hatteras Inlet Coast Guard Station, Petty Officer CARR observed a man and a woman being swept beyond the breakers and into a strong rip-tide.  Petty Officer CARR immediately proceeded to the Coast Guard Station to report the incident and obtain assistance.  Returning to the beach, he took his surfboard, entered the water, and paddled out through the treacherous surf and current.  Reaching the woman, Petty Officer CARR helped her onto the surfboard, returned to shore, and began to administer first aid as the woman was suffering form exhaustion and shock.  As another Coast Guardsman brought the man safely to shore, Petty Officer CARR assisted in administering first aid to the hapless victim until the arrival of a Coast Guard Amphibian which took them to the Hatteras Inlet Medical Center. Petty Officer CARR demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Woodell, Warren E.)


CARROLL, John W., Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  12 February 1977
Date of Award:  02 March 1978

Petty Officer CARROLL is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 12 February 1977 while serving as a member of a rescue party dispatched from Coast Guard Station Chetco River, Oregon to search for three persons who were swept overboard when their 21-foot pleasure craft lost engine power, broached and grounded in turbulent surf south of Smith River, California.  While searching along the beach for the survivors, Petty Officer CARROLL observed two of the victims in the surf approximately 100-yards off-shore.  Recognizing the imminent danger to the two persons, Petty Officer CARROLL summoned help with his portable radio, and then dived into the frigid waters and began swimming towards the hapless victims.  Upon reaching the two persons, Petty Officer CARROLL determined that the man was wearing a life jacket and in much better condition than the woman, who was holding on to a seat cushion. Swimming to the woman, Petty Officer CARROLL attempted to assist her into the rescue basket of a helicopter that had arrived on scene.  During this unsuccessful attempt the woman lost her grip on the sea cushion. Immediately, Petty Officer CARROLL directed his efforts to keep the woman’s head above water, while simultaneously trying to maintain his own precarious position in the huge breakers.  After several more rescue attempts by the helicopter failed, Petty Officer CARROLL realized that the woman was unconscious and that this own endurance was nearly exhausted.  Releasing the woman, he was finally pulled aboard the helicopter and returned to shore.  Petty Officer CARROLL demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue attempt.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


CASSIMUS, Ernest Spiro, Fireman, USCG

Date of Action:  13 April 1969
Date of Award:  16 May 1969

For heroism on the morning of 13 April 1969 while serving as a crew member of CG-44387 engaged in the rescue of five persons from a capsized pleasure craft in the surging surf off Clatsop Spit, Columbia River, Ilwaco, Washington.  The CG-44387 had warned the crew of the pleasure craft of the approaching ebb tide, escorted her to mid-channel, and departed.  Approximately 30 minutes later the pleasure craft was caught in the dangerous breakers and capsized in the 15-foot seas.  CG-44387 immediately returned to the scene and located three survivors clinging to the stern of the overturned boat and two persons holding onto a gas can. Fireman CASSIMUS assisted in pulling three victims to safety as the CG-44387 was maneuvered in the breaking surf.  When one man was observed floating away unconscious and face-down after being slammed against the CG-44387 by the breakers, Fireman CASSIMUS, without hesitation, jumped into the heavy seas, assisted the severely injured man, supported him until arrival of a helicopter, and then placed him in the helicopter rescue basket for evacuation.  The CG-44387 subsequently rescued the last survivor and departed for shore as the helicopter hoisted Fireman CASSIMUS aboard.  Fireman CASSIMUS demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of extreme personal danger, during this rescue. His courage, unselfish actions, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


CAWLEY, John L., Aviation Electrician’s Mate Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  16 December 1976
Date of Award:  19 May 1977 

Petty Officer CAWLEY is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 16 December 1976 while serving as SAR aircrewman of Coast Guard HH-52A 1420 helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of sixteen crew members and passengers from a small commercial aircraft which had ditched two miles south of Victory, British Columbia, Canada.  Departing Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles, Washington, the helicopter encountered a dense fog bank covering the entire water area enroute to the ditch site which required flying at altitudes as low as 10 feet and at very slow speeds.  During this demanding flight, Petty Officer CAWLEY concentrated on both searching and on readying the after cabin by rigging the sea rescue platform and several rafts.  After locating the wreckage, the helicopter was landed in the water and the rescue operation commenced.  Realizing that, because of the distance, he would not be able to throw a line or a raft to the hapless victims, Petty Officer CAWLEY, without hesitation or regard for his personal safety, plunged into the frigid water and towed a raft to the partially submerged aircraft.  As he was directing the first survivor into the raft, the wreckage settled further and capsized, striking the rotating blades of the helicopter and throwing the remaining survivors into the water. Petty Officer CAWLEY swam back to the helicopter, shouting instructions to restore calm. and helped the people onto the rescue platform.  When all were apparently on board the helicopter, he then swam around the wreckage a last time to ensure that everyone had been rescued.  This task completed, he returned to the helicopter and remained outside to allow the survivors the shelter and relative comfort of the cabin.  The helicopter was then water taxied clear of the fog area and the people transferred to arriving surface craft for evacuation to safety.  Petty Officer CAWLEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue and contributed to the saving of sixteen lives.  His unselfish action, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


CHAMPION, Jack Warren, Jr., Electronics Technician Second Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12 February 1962
Date of Award:  21 June 1962

For heroism, on the afternoon of February 12, 1962, when he attempted to rescue a man from drowning off the West Coast of Molokai Island, Hawaiian Islands.  The victim was one of a party of three Coast Guardsmen engaged in recreational swimming. When CHAMPION, who was on duty at the Coast Guard Loran Transmitting Station, Molokai, was informed that one of them was in difficulty, he immediately ran to the scene.  Disregarding his own safety, he jumped into the turbulent water and swam out to assist one of the other swimmers struggling to keep the unconscious man afloat. While progressing toward shore, a large wave separated them and CHAMPION was left alone to handle the helpless man.  However, further water turbulence caused him to lose his grip on the man who then sank beneath the surface of the water.  Although he dived repeatedly in an attempt to find him, his efforts were unsuccessful, and he had to abandon his attempts and swim for his own safety to some nearby rocks which were being pounded by heavy surf and clung there precariously for approximately twenty-five minutes until rescued by a helicopter.  CHAMPION demonstrated initiative and fortitude, in spite of constant and imminent personal danger during this attempted rescue.  His unselfish actions and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.


CLENDENIN, Frank S., Chief Boatswain's Mate, USCG

Date of Action:  15 April 1993
Date of Award:  07 February 1994

Citation not on file.

(Note: A Gold Lifesaving Medal was awarded to Sgt Joseph J. Kroto, USMC for his part in this rescue; and BM1 Steven M. True, USCG, was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal with “O” device for his role in this rescue)


CLUKEY, Wayne D. Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  19 December 1982  
Date of Award:  16 May 1983

Petty Officer CLUKEY is cited for heroism on the evening of 1 December 1982 when he assisted in the rescue of an unconscious man from a burning vehicle moments before it exploded.  Petty Officer CLUKEY and another Coast Guardsman, both assigned to Marine Safety Office St. Louis, were enroute to a Mississippi River cargo dock when they observed a late model sports car leave the roadway, strike a nearby highway sign, and burst into flames.  Petty Officer CLUKEY, without hesitation, turned his vehicle around and headed for the wrecked car while his partner radioed for assistance. Upon arrival at the scene almost half of the vehicle was aflame.  Petty Officer CLUKEY grabbed the fire extinguisher from his vehicle and attempted unsuccessfully to arrest the flames, while his partner concentrated on freeing the car’s lone occupant.  The driver’s door was jammed shut by the crash and the passenger side was in flames. Undaunted, his partner tore off the car’s T-top and began lifting the driver through the roof; however, the steering wheel had pinned the man in his seat and no amount of effort could free him.  Immediately, and with complete disregard for their own safety, using bare hands, the two Coast Guardsmen forced the door open. Working quickly, Petty Officer CLUKEY held the steering wheel clear of the injured driver while his partner pulled him form the burning wreckage.  As they carried the victim away from the vehicle it exploded and was completely engulfed in flames.  They then administered first aid to the driver, who had sustained cuts on the head, until the arrival of the fire department.  Petty Officer CLUKEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Ross, Aaron M.)


COKER, William W., Machinery Technician First Class, USCG

Date of Action:  20 March 1992
Date of Award:  11 June 1992 

Petty Officer COKER is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 20 March 1992 when he rescued two Bolivian Air Force Officers from the smoldering wreckage of a downed aircraft in which he was a passenger.  As a Coast Guard advisor to Bolivia's Waterways Law Enforcement Program, Petty Officer COKER was traveling in the Bolivian Air Force fixed-wing aircraft to a remote jungle base camp in preparation for an upcoming maritime law enforcement mission.  The aircraft crashed into the jungle after an aborted landing attempt.  Dazed, suffering from multiple injuries, and drenched in aviation fuel, Petty Officer COKER crawled from the overturned aircraft wreckage and immediately returned to attempt to rescue the pilot and flight engineer from the smoldering wreckage.  Although an explosion or fire was highly probable, Petty Officer COKER successfully extracted the semiconscious and severely bleeding flight engineer.  Then, with the assistance of a fellow Coast Guardsman, he moved the unconscious and severely bleeding pilot a safe distance from the explosion danger of the wreckage.  An emergency medical technician, Petty Officer COKER was able to stabilize the injured pilot for transport to a medical facility.  Petty Officer COKER demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Holmes, Rick L.)


COPPENS, Evan, Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  27 March 2002
Date of Award:  2 May 2002

Seaman Apprentice COPPENS is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 27 March 2002 during the rescue of a man attempting suicide by drowniug in the freezing waters of the Illinois River.  While pushing a crane barge to service buoys in the river just north of Peoria, Illinois, crewmembers of Coast Guard Cutter SANGAMON spotted a man in the water in obvious trouble. As the cutter maneuvered to rescue him, a towboat with fifteen barges swiftly approached from upstream, unable to stop in the 44-knot river current, posing a great risk of collision with the SANGAMON and certain death for the person in the water. The man did not respond to shouts and verbal commands from the crew and he could not grasp a life ring thrown to him. He did manage to grab the end of a long pole but the swift current quickly turned him face down in the river. Recognizing the gravity and immediacy of the situation, with no time to don cold water protective clothing and survival equipment, Seaman Apprentice COPPENS took immediate and decisive action. Displaying heroic daring at the risk to his own life, he dove into the river and fought the heavy current to swim out to the man, turn him face up out of the water and drag him back to the cutter's barge. While the crew struggled to recover the man from the water, Seaman Apprentice COPPENS lost his grip and was pulled under the SANGAMON's barge, pummeled against the bottom and swept under water another 50 feet down river before surfacing. A small boat from the cutter picked up Seaman Apprentice COPPENS, who was suffering from a concussion and the onset of hypothermia from exposure, to the freezing water. Seaman Apprentice COPPENS demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


CORIELL, Floyd Thomas, Jr., Boatswain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  16 June 1966
Date of Award:  25 January 1967

For heroism on the afternoon of June 16, 1966 while serving as Officer in Charge of CG-40394, engaged in rescue operations following the collision between the British tanker ALVA CAPE and the American tanker TEXACO MASSACHUSETTS off Bergen Point, New Jersey.  Naphtha escaping from the ALVA CAPE exploded and ignited, engulfing both vessels in flames and blinding smoke.  Crew members from both ships jumped into the water. Although the possibility of additional explosions was acute and flames were on the water, Petty Officer CORIELL backed his boat into the holocaust, located and rescued a severely burned unconscious man floating in the water between the vessels which were only 25 feet apart.  After the survivor was removed by helicopter, Petty Officer CORIELL resumed search operations alongside the burning vessels and further assisted in fighting the fire.  Petty Officer CORIELL demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the Untied States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citation: Youngblood, Robert J.  In addition, Silver Lifesaving Medals were awarded to William B. Thorup, Jr., and Joseph B. Snyder, both of whom were civilians, for their respective roles in this rescue).  


CORTEZ, Richard E. II, Boatwain’s Mate Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  12 January 1987
Date of Award:   01 May 1987

Petty Officer CORTEZ is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 12 January 1987 while serving with a rescue party at the entrance to Humboldt Bay near Eureka, California.  On that day, two persons who were viewing the bay from the North Jetty were suddenly washed over the side and onto a concrete breakwater module. One victim sustained two broken legs as he was thrashed about by the raging surf.  His companion, who also suffered a broken leg, was unable to help his friend.  Somehow, though, he managed to escape and seek help. After receiving a report of the incident, Petty Officer CORTEZ and the rescue party proceeded immediately to the scene.  They soon located the victim, trapped in a 42-ton interlocking module that protects the jetty from erosion.  Without hesitation or regard for his own safety, Petty Officer CORTEZ entered a 5-foot wide opening and climbed 20 feet down to reach the trapped victim, who was in danger of being crushed by the heavy surf. Petty Officer CORTEZ immediately removed his swimmer’s harness and placed it on the victim, who was rapidly weakening from a serous loss of blood.  For 30 minutes, Petty Officer CORTEZ used his body to shield the victim from the surging seas and kept him comfortable, refusing to leave, even when the victim told him to save his own life.  When a helicopter finally arrived, Petty Officer CORTEZ attached the hoisting line, and only when he was certain that the victim was hoisted to safety, did he leave his perilous position.  Petty Officer CORTEZ demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue. His courage and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.


CORY, John R. Seaman Apprentice, USCG

Date of Action:  30 October 1991
Date of Award:  09 September 2002

Award Citation [pdf].


CRAVEY, Adam D., Fireman, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  19 January 1996
Date of Award:  09 February 1996

Fireman CRAVEY is cited for extraordinary heroism on the afternoon of 19 January 1996 while serving as Boat Crewman on board Coast Guard motor lifeboat 44352 during the perilous rescue of six crewmen from the tug SCANDIA during a fierce winter storm.  The Coast Guard received a distress call from the SCANDIA reporting they were on fire 4 miles south of Point Judith, Rhode Island.  The motor lifeboat [was] dispatched from Station Point Judith and arrived on scene to find the six victims on the bow off the burning tug trying to escape the fire which was raging out of control.  After successfully removing one victim and maneuvering to rescue the remaining five, an explosion rocked the tug, blowing out the pilothouse windows and forcing the remaining crewmen into the freezing waters of Block Island Sound.  Without hesitation, Fireman CRAVEY, the designated rescue swimmer, determined that his risk of hypothermia was overshadowed by the risk to the crewmen in the water.  Wearing only his anti-exposure coveralls, Fireman CRAVEY successfully assisted the tug's crewmen into the motor lifeboat and was the last one out of the water.  Fireman CRAVEY demonstrated remarkable initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger in this rescue.  His courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Underwood, Michael L.)  


CRISLER, Lynn Terry, Damage Controlman Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  11 June 1967
Date of Award:  28 March 1968 

For heroism on the morning of June 11, 1967 while serving as a volunteer swimmer from the Coast Guard Loran Station Hawaii, engaged in the rescue of three survivors from a downed Cessna 172 which had crashed in the ocean approximately 500 yards Upolu Point, Hawaii.  The victims, two men and two women, although injured, had managed to climb out of the plane which sank immediately in 80 feet of water.  When advised of the ditching and location of the plane, Petty Office CRISLER and four teammates dived into the choppy, shark-infested waters and swam out to rescue the survivors.  When the four occupants of the plane were located, one was unconscious; one was bleeding profusely from a head wound, and two other persons were in apparent shock.  The rescuers then began assisting the survivors back to shore where they were treated by Coast Guard personnel.  Despite Petty Officer CRISLER’s valiant efforts in immediately rendering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the unconscious victim, the man succumbed to his injuries.  Petty Officer CRISLER demonstrated initiative, fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger during the entire rescue mission.  His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United Stated Coast Guard.

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Akana, Paul A., Bennett, George G., Olsen, Robert D., and Pearce, Robert E.)  


CROSBY, Kenneth E., Dental Technician Third Class, USCG

Date of Action:  ??
Date of Award:  18 July 1969 

Citation not on file.


Cruz, Astrubal J., Storekeeper Second Class, USCG (Extraordinary Heroism)

Date of Action:  09 May 1999
Date of Award:  3 July 2000

Award Citation [pdf].  

Coast Guard Press Release (D-14) Number 103-00: 

"Petty Officer Second Class Astubal J. Cruz. . .received the Coast Guard Medal August 28 for his heroic rescue efforts following a landslide at Sacred Falls State Park, O'ahu, Hawaii, which occurred May 9, 1999.  At the time, Cruz was stationed as a seaman on the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, homeported in Honolulu.  He and three other Jarvis crewmembers were hiking in the park when the landslide occurred, dumping tons of rocks on dozens of hikers and campers.  The catastrophic event killed eight people and injured many others.  The four Jarvis crew members demonstrated a total disregard for their own personal safety by re-entering the landslide area to offer assistance.  Cruz assisted a woman whose leg had been crushed by a falling rock.  He tried to keep here blood loss to a minimum by wrapping it with a towel and then made a crude splint so he and one of his companions could carry her to safety.  He also provided encouragement and guidance to other rescuers for three and a half hours as they assisted the injured.  Cruz was honored with the Coast Guard Medal, one of the highest medals awarded during peacetime, as a result of his extraordinary heroism and courage."

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Culnon, William R.; Jackson, Angela; Williams, Jolyn)


CULBERTSON, Edgar Allen, Boatswain’s Mate First Class, USCG (Posthumous Award)

Date of Action:  30 April 1967
Date of Award:  17 August 1967

For heroism on the evening of April 30, 1967 while engaged in searching for two teen-age boys reportedly stranded at the Duluth Entry North Breakwater Light, Minnesota.  Twin 16-year old boys and a 17-year old brother had been seen running along the jetty challenging the 10 to 15-foot waves when witnesses observed a huge wave sweep one boy into the water. When two boys were reported stranded at the light, Petty Officer CULBERTSON and two comrades volunteered to attempt the rescue.  Lashing themselves together, the three men proceeded, with hand lanterns as the only illumination, to the end of the breakwater.  Despite the high waves, winds gusting to 40 knots, driving rain and 36 degree water, the rescue party diligently searched the breakwater and light but found no trace of the boys. While returning to the beach a 20-foot wave swept Petty Officer CULBERTSON off his feet and hurled him up to and over the breakwater parapet into the sea.  Despite the strenuous efforts of his teammates, Petty Officer CULBERTSON perished in this gallant rescue attempt.  His outstanding courage, intrepidity, initiative, and unselfish actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United State Coast Guard. 

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Callahan, Richard R., and Prei, Ronald C.)

Click here for more information and photography.


Culnon, William R., Seaman, USCG

Date of Action:  09 May 1999
Date of Award:  28 August 2000 

Citation not on file.  Coast Guard Press Release (D-14) Number 101-00 stated:

"Petty Officer 3rd Class William R. Culnon. . .received the Coast Guard Medal August 28 for his heroic efforts following a landslide at Sacred Falls State Park, O'ahu, Hawaii, which occurred May 9, 1999.  At the time, Culnon was stationed as a seaman on the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, homeported in Honolulu.  He and three other Jarvis crewmembers were hiking in the park when the landslide occurred, dumping tons of rocks on dozens of hikers and campers.  The catastrophic event killed eight people and injured many others.  The four Jarvis crew members demonstrated a total disregard for their own personal safety by re-entering the landslide area to offer assistance.  Culnon lifted a man from the water who had a compound fracture of the lower leg and was struggling to stay afloat.  He safely carried this man more than two miles to assistance.  In addition he rendered first aid and offered comfort to others who were injured.  Culnon was honored with the Coast Guard Medal, one of the highest medals awarded during peacetime, as a result of extraordinary heroism and courage."

(Related Coast Guard Medal citations: Cruz, Astrubal J.; Jackson, Angela; Williams, Jolyn)


 

Download Plug-Ins
Download Plug-Ins: Some of the links on this page require a plug-in to view them. Links to the plug-ins are available below.
Click Here to Download Adobe Acrobat Reader Adobe Acrobat Reader (PDF)
Last Modified 1/26/2012